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Girl Scouts of Middle Tennessee

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 03/08/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Agenia Clark

Employees:   Full-Time:  46  Part-Time:  2  Volunteers:  7000

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. New employees received a “New Employee Handbook” and walk-through orientation by our Chief Operating Officer. The handbook contains our Mission, Vision, and Values, 3-year Plan of Work and other human resource documents and forms (i.e. signed job description, employee frequently asked questions, communication guidelines, and details regarding benefits and leave). Training is led by direct supervisor and is tailored to each position, but all positions include a Performance Goal Worksheet in which the employee and supervisor create 3-5 measurable goals for the 6-month orientation period.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  4

Number of Board Members:  31  Number of Voting Board Members:  30

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 20

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Summary: The equestrian program of Girl Scouts of Middle Tennessee includes year round programming for troops and individuals, summer camp equestrian programs offered as part of resident camp, and an older girl volunteer program called Vaqueras. Approximately 4,450 girls participated in horse programs, including summer camp, from January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2016 . Girls are racially, economically, and regionally diverse. A Horses and STEM field trip program designed to provide science and math experiences for schools is now included in our offerings. We served over 300 school children with this program in 2016.

Specifics for year round program: Approximately 3850 girls participated in year-round horse programs during the school year from January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2016. This number includes girls participating in grooming programs, ring rides, troop lessons, trail rides, workshops, weekday lessons, and the Vaqueras program.

Horseback riding lessons include both western and English.

Loving and Grooming includes a tour of the barn, learning general safety around horses and ponies, and hands on experience with grooming.

Pony Ready participants advance their grooming skills and learn to lead a horse or pony.

Ponies and Pals provides both introductory hands-on ground experiences with horses and a lead line ride. This program promotes participation of both the young rider and the parent.

Horse Day Camps include riding lessons, games on horseback and around the barn and learning how to get a horse ready to ride.

Ring Ride/Troop Lessons provide riding instruction based on the experience level of the group.

Trail Rides are offered for groups who are 4th grade and older.

Horsemanship workshops provide hands-on experience with the horses, including grooming, horse care, saddling and riding.
Participants also learn about careers with horses and explore many aspects of horses and horsemanship.

Horse Smarts team building incorporates social awareness and a unique approach to enhancing leadership and communication skills by observing and interacting with horses. All activities are non-riding and do not require any experience with horses.

Horse Cents was developed to incorporate financial literacy in horse programming. Participants learn about needs of horses and associated costs as they explore responsible horse ownership in this non-riding program.

Digital Horses is a non-riding program that integrates horses, technology, and art. Experienced photographers assist participants in using digital cameras and laptops to create unique photographs of horses at Camp Sycamore Hills.

Dancing with Horses is an introduction to the sport of vaulting. Participants learn the basic moves both on a practice barrel and on a horse.

Drawing with Horses is a non-riding program which provides drawing instruction with the horse as the subject.

Horses and STEM is a program designed for schools and other educational interests to provide an educational field trip destination which integrates math and science concepts into hands on horse activities.

Specifics for summer camp: 618 girls participated specifically in horse programs during summer resident camp in June and July of 2016. This represents almost 7,000 girl hours at the equestrian center. Horses are also integrated into other parts of the camp culture which allow campers not in horse programs to experience horses. All campers had the opportunity to be a part of unique, often impromptu, horse encounters through fun experiences such as pony spas for the Brownies, all camp equine mysteries, horse appearances at campfire, barn visits, and horse pasture wagon rides. Horse programs are designed to be age appropriate progressive instruction as described below:

Sampler programs give participants introductory ground and riding lessons. Programs are designed for kindergarten and up.

Beginning instructional programs for entering 3rd graders and older have a daily riding lesson and barn time including grooming and other hands on horse experiences. Programs focus on English disciplines or Western disciplines.

More advanced programs have two riding lessons and two barn lessons daily. Programs focus on either Western or English. Participants have hands on experience grooming, tacking, and leading horses safely, as well as learn about careers with horses, horse anatomy, and health care. Our most advanced programs focus on jumping.

Specifics for volunteer program: A unique element of the equestrian program at Camp Sycamore Hills is the Vaqueras program which was started in August, 2005. This program provides middle school and high school age girls opportunities not only to learn and improve horsemanship skills, but to develop leadership and teaching skills while volunteering in the equestrian program. Vaqueras contributed approximately 1500 volunteer hours to the equestrian program from January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2016.
Several recently graduated Vaqueras are participating on college equestrian teams. The Vaqueras program was their primary source of equine instruction before attending college.

Several Vaqueras who have graduated from high school have qualified to be equestrian summer camp staff, lesson instructors, and equestrian facilitators. Many of their leadership skills as well as horsemanship skills have been nurtured in the Vaqueras program. We also have a summer camp internship program for experienced Vaqueras. This paid internship provides opportunities for honing instruction skills and understanding barn management.

Participants in the Vaqueras program, once trained, sign up to work on days when equestrian activities are offered to troops. Vaqueras assist getting horses ready, teach ground skills to younger Girl Scouts, and help riders with basic skills. At some time during the days they volunteer, Vaqueras also have a riding lesson or other horseback experience. These dedicated young volunteers have had a significant impact on the quality of the equestrian program. Although staff and adult volunteers always supervise the delivery of the equestrian program, having Vaqueras assisting means troop participants generally have one-on-one assistance when needed. Troop leaders have also expressed appreciation for the positive role models Vaqueras provide for their younger Girl Scouts.

The five-level upgrade process for Vaqueras provides motivation for girls to continually strive for excellence in all aspects of their participation, including safety, teaching, leadership, and horsemanship. Although the primary focus for Vaqueras is on weekend program, they also have opportunities to participate in special activities such as horse shows and workshops organized specifically for them.

Specifics for the Horses and STEM field trip program:
Field trips can be tailored to the age and interest of the groups. Below is a list of topics currently offered.
CLASSIFICATION using horse colors, size, and/or markings
GENETICS using horse coat colors (a really fun topic for middle school and up!)
MATH AND MEASUREMENT- predictions
Height - conversions: inches, hands, cm, feet
Height versus; length of stride
Weight - weight tape versus formula versus scale weight- how we use to determine food and medicine
Heart rates can indicate pain, level of fitness. Observe impact of exercise, breed, size
Respiration - observe impact of exercise, breed, size
Temperature - observe impact of exercise and environment
Fencing - estimating materials, cost, etc.
Acreage (how many acres/horse)
Measuring feed
Calories
Water
Budgeting and cost analysis centered around horse ownership
Leadership/team building using horses -
USING TECHNOLOGY
Digital horses - photography, photo manipulation on the computer- limited group size unless they have their own cameras and laptops
Infrared mapping of the horse
OBSERVATION
Characteristics
Condition scoring
Behavior
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT of horses
FORCE AND MOTION - predict what forces are involved in horse and rider movement
MEDICINE AND ANATOMY
Vision of horse compare to human
Vital signs - see measurement

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. Girl Scouts aims to empower girls and to help teach values such as honesty, fairness, courage, compassion, character, sisterhood, confidence and citizenship through activities including camping, community service, learning first aid, and earning badges by acquiring other practical skills. From our willingness to tackle important societal issues, to our commitment to diversity and inclusiveness, Girl Scouts is dedicated to every girl, everywhere.

Programs are varied, but support areas of leadership, STEM, financial literacy, healthy living, and the arts. Girl Scouts of Middle Tennessee has approximately 13,000 girls and 7,000 adults. In addition, outreach programs greatly impact communities in 39 counties of Middle Tennessee and beyond.

Other than horses and two barn cats, no other animals are owned by Girl Scouts, but many programs promote animal welfare. Numerous programs also educate girls and communities about environmental issues that impact domestic animals and wildlife. Many Girl Scouts, either individually or as a group, are actively engaged in making their communities a better place for animals.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  Yes



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     As a CHA accredited site, Camp Sycamore Hills, owned by Girl Scouts of Middle Tennessee, follows management practices consistent with CHA standards. Herd management and program planning are supervised by full-time equine professionals who are certified through CHA. Horses go through a careful selection process and are assessed through every step of acclimation to the environment and program. Facilities are maintained to high standards of safety and cleanliness. Feeds, supplements, health care and farrier care are individualized for each horse. Work loads of horses are monitored to be consistent with CHA standards and adjusted based on the condition of the horse. Horses are schooled and/or exercised by trained individuals, either staff or volunteers.

Our herd has between 40 and 42 horses. This number is based on being a sustainable number for the combination of our pastures and hay fields, as well as taking into account our 42 stall barn. Except in years of drought, we are able to grow all of our hay.

We have occasionally accepted horses who may have been poorly maintained so long as there are not behavioral issues associated with physical abuse that would make them unsafe to be around children. These horses are put on carefully planned diets and exercise plans. Once they are adequately conditioned, they are worked into our program.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Most of the horses in our program are donated, though we do occasionally purchase a horse with special skills that will enhance our program. We have also adopted a few rescue horses. Horses are donated for a variety of reasons, including that the horse has finished a previous career such as fox hunting, barrel racing or showing; a youth rider has gone to college; or a family can no longer take care of the horse. We have accepted horses with minor physical impairments which prevent the previous owner from participating in extremely athletic or competitive pursuits but the horse can still provide positive basic horse experiences in our program.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     We find qualified homes for horses who can no longer be used in our program for health or behavioral issues. Horses over the age of 26 are seriously considered for retirement regardless of apparent health. Other reasons for retirement include ongoing physical impairments that cause the horse discomfort for basic riding activities, unhappiness with the work not resolved by extended periods of rest or change of job, and injuries or conditions that seriously impair vision. All potential homes are screened for suitability. We work with potential adopters to be sure they understand the needs of the horse.

Because most horses leaving our facility have had extensive experience as child-friendly horses, they often go to Girl Scout or non-Girl Scout families with young children. Especially in cases of a horse going to an inexperienced owner, we provide coaching and assistance as needed. If a horse leaves for behavioral reasons, we find a home where the horse will have an experienced owner knowledgeable in dealing with the horse’s issues.

Horses continue to be cared for, regardless of usability, until a home is found.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     We screen horses first by phone, asking questions related to health and suitability for our program. We ask about age, vaccination history including Coggins testing, known health issues, dental history, whether the horse has been shod and/or barefoot, if he/she is pasture kept or stalled, how many horses he/she has been kept with, the place in the current herd, etc. We also ask about the horse’s experiences with people, including trail riding, arena work, English and/or Western, showing, being around children, and the kind of bit accustomed to.

If the phone screening indicates the horse might be adaptable to our environment and safe for our program, we generally make an on-site visit which will include an assessment of ground manners, health and temperament. If the horse is potentially suitable, one of the staff will do a test ride to assess behavior under saddle. If thought to be a good fit, we will take the horse on a trial basis. After a pre-determined period, usually two weeks to 30 days, the horse would be returned if he does not adapt or seem suitable. On rare occasions, if it appears to be in the best interest of the horse, we may work out with the donor that we will find a good home for the horse should he not work out for our program.

Though we do not usually do a veterinary check, we do require a current Coggins and request any health records available. If there is a health issue of concern that has been disclosed or observed during the initial assessment, we may request a consultation with the owner’s vet or take the horse to our own vet before accepting a horse. Depending on where the horse came from, new horses are kept isolated for two days to three weeks. They are gradually introduced to the herd by being turned out with a few of our calmest horses and then with other small groups of horses.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Our horses are brought in most days for feed and a visual assessment of health, including looking for lameness, unusual stance, swellings, open cuts, weeping eyes, and nasal discharge. On rare days when they are not brought into the barn, a staff member goes to the pasture and does the visual check in the pasture.

Horses are weight taped monthly with weights recorded and compared to previous weights. Henneke body condition score is observed. Feed amounts and supplements are adjusted accordingly. We use a basic Nutrena feed to which we add a rice bran based fat supplement and/or beet pulp when needed for specific horses. Most of our older horses receive supplements such as MSM or others helpful for maintenance of comfort and joint health. Our gray horses receive a chaste berry supplement which has been very effective in eliminating or reducing melanoma related to grays. Older horses with ongoing digestive issues receive a pro-biotic supplement. Horses prone to metabolic related issues receive appropriate supplements and are kept on dry lot in lush grass seasons.

Horses whose breed or history pre-disposes them to uveitis wear eye protection or are kept in during the day. All horses prone to sunburn are sun screened daily during appropriate seasons.

All horses are Coggins tested and vaccinated annually. Because we are a closed facility with no outside horses coming and going, we do only the following vaccinations: Eastern/Western equine encephalomyelitis, tetanus, West Nile, and Rabies. Horses are dewormed two to four times per year, depending on climate factors and fecal testing. Teeth are floated annually.

Our farrier comes every two weeks year round and trims a quarter of the horses. This allows horses to be on a six week, eight week, or 10 week schedule, depending on the needs of the individual horse. Most are on an eight week schedule, though some require a shorter schedule, especially in warmer months. All horses are kept barefoot unless there is a special need for shoes, either temporarily or on an ongoing basis, for medical reasons.

Our vet reviews any issues during the onsite visit when Coggins and vaccinations are done. In addition, our vet does phone consultations when needed for specific issues. We also transport injury and illness cases, if necessary, to the vet. If a horse cannot be transported, our vet does make farm calls.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Euthanasia is only considered in the case of medical need and at the advice of our veterinarian. A healthy horse would not be considered for euthanasia. We recently had a horse that had gone blind. It took over a year to find a home for her, but were eventually able to find a situation for her where she is well cared for and contributing to a program that provides equestrian experiences for disabled children.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     We only accept geldings and mares into our program. We do not breed horses, nor do we intentionally accept mares that are pregnant into our care. We currently have two horses who were born at our facility because the pregnancy of the mares was not known or disclosed when the mares were accepted. Both of the offspring have been trained and are now part of our program. If they had not been suitable for our program after training, they would have been re-homed to appropriate owners.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
*Missing

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Camp Sycamore Hills

2020 Girl Scout Road Ashland City TN 37015

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Carol Coats

2. Contact's Phone: 615-947-3214

3. Contact's Email: ccoats@gsmidtn.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 8.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 100

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Camp Sycamore Hills has two large pastures and two paddocks. The pastures are each approximately 24 acres of grassland with additional wooded acreage. The paddocks serve as areas for separating particular horses from the herd when needed and dry lot in rich grass times. Fencing in the paddocks and pastures is high tensile with an additional electric wire in some areas. The barn is open air, but covered, and is used for feeding and program preparation. Each horse has an 8ft x 12ft stall constructed of 2" x 8"s. Because horses only stay in the barn for a few hours at a time and are then turned back to pasture, horses rarely lay down in the stalls. Water is provided in every stall at all times. If a horse must be kept up for injury or illness, we use a large 20ft x 20ft stall or a 10ft™ x 15ft stall, both isolated from the main barn but well protected from the elements. Some programs, such as horse care workshops, utilize the barn as program space. The open air barn eliminates ventilation issues while providing shade for horses waiting to work. We have a large covered area on the back of our original barn, approximately 80' x 16' that is available to horses when in the paddocks. It can also be made available when horses are out to pasture by opening that paddock. This provides pasture shelter in addition to trees. In times of severe weather such as freezing rain, we can also make our covered arena which is 160' x 80' available to horses. In addition to pastures, we have two fescue/timothy hay fields with a combined acreage of 41 acres. Using an outside contractor with whom we split the hay crop, we cut 2 to 3 times in the growing season. In normal years, we are able to grow all of our own hay.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Our herd is rotated between the two main pastures. During times of good grass, several ponies and horses are isolated to paddocks and fed hay for weight control and to reduce risk of grass founder. Our hay fields and pastures are fertilized and limed based on soil testing. Except in unusual weather conditions, pastures remain viable through our normal growing season. During the winter, pasture is supplemented with hay grown at our facility. In a year of severe drought, we have had to buy hay from out-of-state sources. When we reseed pastures, horses are temporarily kept in the paddocks with hay until the new grass has taken hold. We also restrict horses to the paddocks when we fertilize pastures. In the case of severe weather such as freezing rain, the herd can be divided into compatible groups that can seek cover in our covered arena, the shelter on the back of old barn, and in the open area of our old barn.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 20

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Camp Sycamore Hills has one covered (not enclosed) arena which is 160' x 80', one outdoor arena which is 200' x 75', and a large round pen. The covered arena has a sand footing and is suitable for any of our equine activities. The outdoor arena is sand over fine screenings and provides secure footing for equine activities, even after rains. The round pen is grass and dirt. In very wet conditions, it is closed to equine activities due to insecure footing. We use a harrow and/or TR3 for maintenance of the surfaces of arenas. We also have a sprinkler system for the sand surface of the covered arena to minimize dust. Trails are on bottom lands with very little rock. Most trails have shaded options through wooded areas. In very wet times, trail rides are replaced with arena rides. Ground activities occur in our barn, indoor classroom, and available arenas. Stalls have cross-ties that allow horses to be cross-tied in the stall when preparing to ride or in the barn aisle when conducting hands-on ground activities with horses and children. We also have hitching rails in our old barn that provides additional shade and/or wind protection for ground activities.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Camp Sycamore Hills is accredited by, and adheres to the standards of, Certified Horsemanship Association. We also follow the standards of the American Camp Association and the Safety Checkpoints of the Girl Scouts of the USA. Camp Sycamore Hills is inspected at least twice annually by the Cheatham County Health Department.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     We have a 4 horse trailer and truck which is designated for use by the equestrian program. All horses, including our draft horses, can be transported in this trailer.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Saddles are fitted to horses when entering the program. Regular assessments are made as condition changes. All horses have a western and English saddle assigned to them. If an instructor or student chooses another saddle, fit is checked either by trained personnel or in accordance with a chart of acceptable choices provided by full-time staff who have checked saddle fit for that saddle and horse. Saddle pads, girths, and cinches are washed regularly. All equipment is checked for wear prior to each use. Saddles are cleaned as needed.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Every horse's stall is labeled with the horse's name, amount of feed, supplements, and other instructions. Each horse has labeled pictures displayed in our classroom area. Seasonal staff are provided a horse skills and temperament summary sheet. Training includes hands-on experiences with as many horses as possible, along with collaboration with experienced staff to build an adequate knowledge base about individual horses.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Our horses are normally in the pasture except when working, waiting to work, or in for feed and health checks. Horses are brought in every morning for feed. Each horse knows where their stall is and will generally go directly to their stall during the morning procedures. Once horses have finished eating and any health matters have been addressed, horses not working are turned out to pasture. During the winter, horses needing extra meals or medications are kept in a paddock with hay to be brought in as needed. Horses needing stall rest or limited turn out due to injury or illness are kept in a smaller barn that has an isolation stall and can have round pen access. This area has also been used in extreme weather for horses that need extra protection from the elements.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Horses are weight taped monthly with estimated weights recorded and compared to previous weights. The Henneke body condition score is observed. Feed amounts and supplements are adjusted accordingly. We use a basic Nutrena feed to which we add a rice bran based fat supplement and/or beet pulp when needed for specific horses. Most of our older horses receive supplements such as MSM or others helpful for maintenance of comfort and joint health. Our gray horses receive a chaste berry supplement which has been effective in eliminating or reducing melanoma related to grays. Older horses with ongoing digestive issues receive a pro-biotic supplement. Horses prone to metabolic related issues receive appropriate supplements. Feed and supplements are kept in a closed room inaccessible to horses or other animals. Medications are kept in a climate controlled, lockable room.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Full-time equestrian staff are familiar and use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score system to assess the needs of horses. Most of our horses maintain a condition score of 5 to 5 ½. Diet and exercise for horses above or below is adjusted appropriately.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     The stalls and arenas are mucked 1 to 3 times per day when horses are kept up for program. Manure is removed to a site away from the barn. Horses are dewormed 2- 4 times a year to control normal internal parasites. Because pinworms are prevalent in our area and have a different life cycle than most other internal parasites, we have effectively used diatomaceous earth powdered around the anus daily to break their life cycle between normal deworming. Our veterinarian provides information on any known outbreaks of diseases locally. Volunteers and staff understand to take precautions if coming from other equine facilities. Besides manure disposal, fly control measures have included natural fly sprays and feed through control. We currently use predator wasps as a primary part of our fly control. Carcasses of dead wildlife are removed from pastures and other areas where horses have access. Should a horse die on property, it is buried away from human and horse access.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     One of our pastures is prone to flooding in severe wet weather. Staff stays up-to-date on conditions that could lead to flooding, or other severe weather. Horses are turned out to higher ground when flooding is a possibility. In severe cold, horses are still turned out, but extra measures are taken to see that they are dry and clean. All pastures, paddocks, arenas, and the barn have at least two exits in the case of fire. An extinguisher is located near each arena and in the barn. The full-time equestrian manager lives on the property and therefore can immediately address emergency issues. The site manager is also available to assist.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The facility is isolated from neighbors and public roads by topography which allows easy monitoring of vehicle traffic by both the full-time equestrian manager and the full-time site manager who live on the property. We have a gate which can be closed when site personnel are away.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Cheatham County Animal Control 2797 Sams Creek Rd. Pegram, TN 37143 ccactn@gmail.com (615) 792-3647

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Cheatham County Sheriff 200 Court Sq, Ashland City, TN 37015 mac.judkins@cheathamcountytn.gov (615) 792-4341


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 02/14/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Darrell Holt, Dr. Cory Goodlett, Dr. Johnson

Clinic Name: Animal House Veterinary Clinic    Street: 410 Dover Road    City: Clarksville  State: TN    Zip: 37042

Phone: 931-645-7757    Email: vetcaregroup@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Ashley Myers

     2. Instructor: Carol Coats

     3. Instructor: Jen Vaughn

     4. Instructor: Kathryn Poindexter

     5. Instructor: Marianne England

     6. Instructor: Marissa Brockette

     7. Instructor: Ruth Coats

     8. Instructor: Shaniqua Berry


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 40.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 40

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 42

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Horse/Barn Supplies includes $1600 of new Drinking Post waterers that are a one time expense.

42 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 4 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

46 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 6 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

6 = Total of 2d-2f

40 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            40 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$8000     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$60     Bedding.

$3300     Veterinarian.

$6825     Farrier.

$3040     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$1000     Medications & Supplements.

$2100     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$19000     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$1000     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$44325     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

14965     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $3
Question 3 ($44,325 ) divided by Question 4 (14965).

Average length of stay for an equine: 325 days
Question 4 (14965) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (46).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? Most of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? Most of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? Most of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Less often than weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 999

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 40

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 52

4. What is the average wait list time? 0 Weeks(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 0.00  Un-Mounted: 0.00  Total: 0 *Missing/Error

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 4

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 60%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed. Our facility serves many clients who come for a one-time experience such as a trail ride. Other clients come for weekly activities such as lessons. We also have resident camp experiences where clients spend the week and have multiple activities per day. We provide over 4500 horse experiences annually.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Ashley Myers

         *Facility Participation:

         Camp Sycamore Hills

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Girl Scouts

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equestrian instructor training

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Middle Tennessee State Univeristy

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.B.S. Horse Science


     2. *Instructor: Carol Coats

         *Facility Participation:

         Camp Sycamore Hills

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Certified Horsemanship Association

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2003

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Level 3 western instructor Level 2 English instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Tennessee Department of Agriculture

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Disaster Animal Response Team credentialed responder ID# C2652

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Carol has been the Equestrian Manager for Girl Scouts of Middle Tennessee since 2005.


     3. *Instructor: Jen Vaughn

         *Facility Participation:

         Camp Sycamore Hills

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Girl Scouts

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equestrian instructor training


     4. *Instructor: Kathryn Poindexter

         *Facility Participation:

         Camp Sycamore Hills

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Girl Scouts

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equestrian Instructor training


     5. *Instructor: Marianne England

         *Facility Participation:

         Camp Sycamore Hills

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Certified Horsemanship Association

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Level 3 English Level 2 Western

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. BA in Equine Studies - Equitation Instruction BA in Equine Studies - Equine Management MEd in Higher Education - focus on Collegiate Riding-- Marianne is the Assistant Equestrian Manager for the Girl Scouts of Middle Tennessee.


     6. *Instructor: Marissa Brockette

         *Facility Participation:

         Camp Sycamore Hills

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Girl Scouts

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equestrian instructor training


     7. *Instructor: Ruth Coats

         *Facility Participation:

         Camp Sycamore Hills

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Girl Scouts

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2006

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equestrian instructor training


     8. *Instructor: Shaniqua Berry

         *Facility Participation:

         Camp Sycamore Hills

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Girl Scouts

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equestrian instructor training