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Windridge Therapeutic Equestrian Center

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 01/12/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Dawn Martin

Employees:   Full-Time:  9  Part-Time:  0  Volunteers:  42

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Windridge's employees and volunteers receive on the job training for handling horses and performing job duties. Documentation is kept of annual evaluations performed on each employee and a job description is on file for each employee position. Windridge also maintains a policy, procedure, and reference manual and employee manual for all employee related information such as vacation, dress code, protocol for dismissal, etc. A volunteer manual is also on hand and received by each volunteer their first to layout the guidelines for volunteering at Windridge.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  10

Number of Board Members:  11  Number of Voting Board Members:  11

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  Yes

If yes, provide the name, title and responsiblility of each VOTING Board member who is compensated: A board member is indirectly compensated because they are the parent of the development director/certified instructor employed by the organization. Brenda Buck is the mother of a staff member and is named the Interim Executive Director in Windridge's Emergency Succession Plan. Is responsible to advise the board in areas of human services, research and suggest evaluation tools to assess the executive director and evaluates Windridge's by-laws periodically. Casie Buck is the Development Director and a PATH,Intl. certified instructor, is a board member's daughter, who's responsibilities are grant writing and taking care of the Windridge herd and teaching classes. Brenda Buck does not vote on staff issues, due to a conflict of interest, and steps out of the room when decisions of this nature are being made by the board.

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member. A board member is the parent of the development director/ certified instructor employed by the organization. Brenda Buck is the mother of a staff member and is named the Interim Executive Director in Windridge's Emergency Succession Plan. Is responsible to advise the board in areas of human services, research and suggest evaluation tools to assess the executive director and evaluates Windridge's by-laws periodically. Casie Buck is the Development Director and a PATH, Intl. Certified instructor, is a board member's daughter, who's responsibilities are grant writing and taking care of the Windridge herd and teaching classes. Brenda Buck does not vote on staff issues, due to a conflict of interest, and steps out of the room when decisions of this nature are being made by the board.

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Our Therapeutic Riding Program provides an innovative and highly beneficial form of therapy incorporating education and exercise utilizing the beneficial movement of the horse while teaching riding skills. The horse's movement manipulates a rider's body to the finest degree as if they are walking. This movement produces weight bearing through limbs and joints, rotation of the pelvis, sensory stimulation, and strengthening and stretching of muscles. All are vital to a person with a disability as their exposure to physical exercise is often limited. Clients enjoy learning to care for their horse and interact with peers, volunteers, and instructors as they focus on an activity that is therapeutic and educational, broadening their attention span while promoting cooperation, teamwork, and social interaction, fostering self sufficiency and independence, and developing life skills; while the child or adult is gaining equestrian skills.

The Therapeutic Driving Program is designed for individuals who have a desire to learn how to drive a horse drawn vehicle. Windridge has several horse drawn vehicles, one being a wheelchair accessible driving vehicle, allowing participants to receive many of the same benefits of therapeutic riding; such as joint compression, coordination, word association, socialization and the development of new skills. Windridge was the first center in Texas to offer therapeutic driving to individuals with disabilities.

Hippotherapy Program "Hippo" is Greek for horse. Hippotherapy is therapy with the help of the horse and a licensed physical, occupational, or speech therapist or therapist assistant is involved in the direct treatment of each client. The horse is used as a therapy tool and position changes and exercises are utilized to promote therapy progress. Horsemanship skills are not focused on in the Hippotherapy program like they are in Therapeutic Riding. Instead position changes and exercises are used to influence client progress. It is proven through research that the horse takes approximately 3,000 steps in 30 minutes. This is 3,000 repetitions of therapeutic movement a client receives which cannot be duplicated in any other traditional therapy settings. Windridge has aligned with Kidz First Therapy to provide hippotherapy. Kidz First Therapy therapists in conjunction with Windridge certified instructors provide hippotherapy to children. Windridge was the first center in Texas to offer hippotherapy.

Equines in Service for Heroes Program is in its grass root stages. Even though Windridge has severed our veterans throughout the years (men who served in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and Desert Storm) today, Windridge is rallying behind the Professional Association for Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH, Intl.) efforts for PATH, Intl. centers to include the veteran program Horses for Heroes at their centers.

Our Adult Volunteer Program involves adults who wish to give back to the community and they receive 40 initial hours of training. As each adult volunteer works with our instructors, they are progressed through 3 levels of volunteering with each level representing a skill and knowledge base that ensures their ability to assist therapeutic riding and driving instructors in conducting safe, effective, and therapeutic programs for each client.

Teenage Volunteer/Mentoring Program Quest for Success - focuses on the youth of our community (ages 10-19) to encourage teen voluntarism. This unique program focuses on disability awareness, effective communication, how to interact with authoritative figures, and mentors teens developing leadership and job skills.
Educational Program Therapeutic and Equine Mastery: This multi-faceted program is unique in several ways, including:
1. Volunteer to work program. As Windridge needed a certified instructor it looked at its volunteers offering the opportunity for a volunteer to become a certified instructor employed with Windridge.
2. Education for Windridge's teaching personnel and equine staff.
3. Opportunities for college student rotations and internships.
4. Educational materials are written and produced to include PATH, Intl. centers and universities that provide equine assisted activities and therapies as well as the equine industry.
Research: The benefit a child with a disability receives from a horse is recognized by neurologists, pediatricians, therapists, and special educators however; the horse has yet to be authenticated scientifically. Windridge steps forward to conduct the necessary research to validate the horse's three-dimensional movement.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. N/A

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Windridge's equine management philosophies and practices;
a. We accept horses that meet our client and program needs: equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT).
b. We accept, maintain and provide the schooling for up to 24 horses.
c. We accept horses that have various backgrounds such as abuse or abandonment, have performed in the various equestrian disciplines as well as recreation or trail.
d. We accept horses of all breed types.
e. We accept horses in accordance to our knowledge and ability to rehabilitate and/or school the horse for equine-assisted activities and therapy programs.
f. Once accepted into our program, the horses remain with us for life.
g. We believe our horses should be pastured, have ample room to move, graze and socialize as a herd.
i. Each field has fresh water.
ii. There are woods and numerous shelters for the horse’s protection from weather, biting insects and relief from the sun.
iii. The horses are maintained in a herd environment, both mares and geldings.
iv. Roughage is provided free choice; East Texas native pasture grasses and grass hay (Coastal Bermuda).
h. When necessary horses are removed from the herd for medical reasons and age. In the event a horse is removed, the horse is paired with a companion.
i. Normally, we accept horses that range in age from 5 to 8 that pass our pre-acquisition evaluation and a veterinarian pre-purchase exam. Since our policy is to keep the horses their entire life, we accept horses that are younger, healthy and sound. This enables the horse to grow older with us with less chance of disorders such as arthritis becoming an issue. From time to time, we accept horses that are older and as stated earlier, abused or abandoned.
j. The horses are brought up into their stalls on a daily basis for the following reasons;
i. Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapy Programs
1. Thirty-eight weeks of the year, six days a week the horses are brought up into the stalls twice a day for Windridge's programs. The horses come up for morning classes, turned out for an hour lunch period and brought back up for afternoon classes. Upon which they are turned back out for the evening. Day seven, the horses are brought up only once for grain and evaluation of health and soundness, then turned back out into the fields until the following morning. Afternoon checks are conducted to evaluate health and soundness on the seventh day.
2. Thirteen weeks of the year, which include holidays, in-service weeks and summer break the horses are brought up into their stalls once a day, seven days a week, for grain, care, evaluation of health and training sessions when schooling is on the schedule. Afternoon checks are conducted to evaluate health and soundness during these weeks.
ii. Grain
iii. Evaluation of health and care
iv. Schooling
v. Medical reasons
vi. Shelter in severe weather such as ice storms
k. Training and Conditioning Program:
i. Once the horse is accepted into our programs, an evaluation is conducted to assess the horse's knowledge and skill level. A rehabilitation and/or training program is developed to provide the necessary schooling the horse needs to begin their involvement in Windridge's EAAT program(s).
ii. Horses are conditioned for the work required which includes under saddle or in harness sessions, lunging, long-lining and in-hand walk/trot sessions.
iii. Horses are evaluated daily for soundness and burn-out. Indicators of burn-out are noticed when staff or volunteers enter the stall, while being groomed or tacked, while being handled or ridden for conditioning purposes and class participation. Equine manager is notified immediately if there are any indicators of burn-out. Evaluation and intervention is implemented.
iv. Each horse's behavior, skills and work schedule is evaluated on an on-going basis.
v. Each horse receives continuing education. This includes work in the arena, fields and trails.
vi. In accordance to a staff members' knowledge and ability, each horse is ridden by staff in educational classes to further the horses' knowledge and skills and to help maintain the horses' conditioning.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Windridge accepts horses as a donation. Under unusual circumstances Windridge will rescue a horse. Horses may be purchased if necessary.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     In 25 years Windridge has been able to stand by its policy that once a horse is accepted by Windridge that horse remains with us for its entire life-span. As Windridge's horses grow older the horse's care and work schedule are adjusted to meet the horse's present needs. These adjustments may include restrictions in the way the horse is involved in Windridge's EAAT programs, nutrition, living arrangements, shoeing and types of medications for the horse's comfort. When a horse reaches a time in their lives when specific measures must be taken for the health and well-being of the horse, Windridge requires three professionals to agree and sign a plan of use and care. These professionals are Windridge's Program Director, Veterinarian and Farrier.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     If Windridge is interested in a horse, after the initial contact by the horse owner to offer their horse as a donation for Windridge's EAAT programs, the following steps are taken by Windridge personnel. Contingent on the individual fulfilling the respective staff position Windridge personnel may refer to the Program Director, Equine Manager, or Trainer. The term, personnel will be used for the following remarks in regards to the individual employed with Windridge.
a. Windridge personnel will explain to the horse owner our policies include a two-part evaluation process:
i. Initial evaluation conducted by personnel
ii. Pre-purchase examination conducted by Windridge's veterinarian
b. Personnel schedules a visit to evaluate the horse at the horse owner's home or stable in which the horse is boarded.
c. Personnel travel to the horse owner's stable to evaluate the horse. An evaluation includes;
i. Evaluation of conformation, health, soundness and behavior
ii. The horse owner is requested to demonstrate the knowledge and skills the horse possesses which include;
1. Ground manners in hand and while tied
2. Groomed and tacked
3. Shown under saddle and/or in harness
4. Clipped and/or bathed when requested by Windridge personnel
5. Lounged and/or long-lined when requested by Windridge personnel
iii. In the event the horse owner is unable to demonstrate the horse’s knowledge and skills, the horse owner may choose a family member, friend or professional horse trainer to demonstrate the horse's knowledge and skills. Personnel are to refrain from conducting the initial demonstration to exhibit the horse's knowledge and skills. In the event a horse is abused or abandoned and Windridge chooses to bring this horse to the center for rehabilitation the horse will be assessed under the present conditions, care for by a veterinarian, brought to the center and quarantined. At that time a plan of care and training will be established.
iv. After the horse owner has represented the horse's behavior, knowledge and skills personnel will make a decision whether to continue with the evaluation. If personnel choose to continue with the evaluation they may elect to handle, ride or drive the horse. They may also decide to show the horse a few props such as a rain slicker, pom-pom, cloth toy or wheelchair to assess the horse's response.
v. Once the initial evaluation of the horse is conducted Windridge personnel will decide whether the horse is accepted or denied.
If the horse is accepted, personnel will set up an appointment with Windridge’s veterinarian for a pre-purchase exam. The veterinarian pre-purchase exam includes but is not limited to;
1. General health, conformation and gait analysis
2. Fore and hind limb flexion tests
3. Blood work
4. Neurological test
5. Radiographs will be taken to eliminate navicular disease, ring bone or other forms of arthritis. Which radiographs will be taken will be determined by Windridge's veterinarian and personnel.
Personnel and the horse owner will decide prior to the pre-purchase exam which party will haul the horse. It is advised for the horse owner to haul the horse to the clinic.
vi. Personnel will take Windridge's truck and horse trailer with them. If the horse passes the veterinarian pre-purchase exam, the appropriate documents will be signed which may include but not limited to the following documents by the horse owner and designated personnel:
1. Donation form
2. Breed association owner transfer form
3. Proof of Ownership Sales Receipt
vii. The horse's records are to be given to personnel which include but not limited to:
1. Annual vaccinations
2. De-worming schedule
3. Farrier schedule
4. Training schedule
5. Proof of negative Coggins test
The horse becomes a member of Windridge's equine staff, contingent to the blood work, and is taken to Windridge. If Windridge insists on blood work being drawn prior to the pre-purchase examination, the work-up is to be conducted by the horse owner's veterinarian and the pre-purchase exam will not be conducted until the results are available. Even so, Windridge's veterinarian is to run a blood test.
viii. Once the horse arrives at Windridge, the horse is either quarantined of graduated into the herd. The only reason the horse is allowed to enter the herd without being quarantine is because the horse was in an environment where horses were not transported, all vaccinations and Coggins tests were conducted and none of the horses had been sick for six weeks.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Windridge's health care plan includes but not limited to the following:
a. Annual veterinarian evaluation.
i. Assessment of general health; vitals, lungs, body condition, etc.
ii. Gait analysis
iii. Dental work
iv. Vaccinations
v. Blood work as needed
vi. Radiographs as needed
b. Deworming every six to eight weeks according to veterinarian recommendations
c. Farrier work every five weeks
d. Daily assessment includes general health, soundness and burn-out

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Under NO circumstance will Windridge euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space. In 25 years of operation Windridge can attest to its euthanasia policy as it has been put to the test. When a decision to euthanize a horse is apparent, two individuals, Windridge's Program Director and Veterinarian must agree this is the best decision for the horse under the circumstance. If both professionals cannot agree this is the time to euthanize a horse, a plan of care must be decided and the horse is cared for by Windridge in accordance to the veterinarian's plan of care. The conditions in which a decision will be made to euthanize a horse includes but not limited to the following;
a. Colic in which the situation is incurable without surgery. Windridge does not have the funds for this type of surgery. If the funds were donated for the horses to receive colic surgery and after care, the horse would then receive the surgery.
b. Arthritic conditions in which the horse has significant difficulties moving and laying down comfortably. Again, Windridge's Program Director and Veterinarian must agree about medications and plan of care. When both professionals agree the horse's condition has decreased beyond the agreed plan of care then a decision is made to euthanize a horse.
c. Fractured limbs, neck or jaw are other conditions in which a decision to euthanize a horse would be made.
d. Toxicity or other type of health condition or illness where the horse's condition is terminal, even when care has been provided, then Windridge would make the decision to euthanize a horse.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     Windridge does not purposefully breed any of our mares. If a mare is donated and happens to be pregnant, the foal remains with Windridge for its lifetime. Windridge will raise the foal to maturity and provide the necessary training for it to be a part of our EAAT programs.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     Yes

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training? 
     Several horses at Windridge are involved in Windridge's research program. Windridge's research efforts include collaborations with universities to conduct research. Even so, Windridge has strict research policies that outline the use of our horses. Only Windridge personnel are allowed to handle the horses when research projects are conducted. Windridge does not lease, loan, or allow other facilities or institutions to use our horses for research or medial training.

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. 
     N/A

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     N/A

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
*Missing

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
*Missing

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Windridge Therapeutic Equestrian Center

593 Windridge Rd Gilmer TX 75645

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Dawn Martin

2. Contact's Phone: 903-797-2414

3. Contact's Email: windridgetx@aol.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 6.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 28

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Windridge has three pastures. Each pasture is fenced with two types of fencing. Pipe posts, top rail and either three strands of smooth horse wire or three pipe rails or t-posts with three strands of slick horse wire. Windridge practices pasture rotation. When the horses are in the pastures they have access to run-in sheds and woods for protection from weather, biting insects and the summer sun. The horses come up into their stalls during operating hours. Windridge's stable area has 24 stalls. The stalls are manufactured horse stalls. Windridge has one paddock with shelter for horses that need to be in a dry lot for medical reasons. The fencing of the paddock is constructed out of pre-made horse panels. Fresh water is offered in each field, paddock and stall.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Windridge's pastures are a mixture of Coastal Bermuda, native grasses and Bahia. Pasture management includes rotation, dragging and aerating fields, erosion control and terracing. Windridge uses a manure spreader to spread the horse manure from the stalls back onto the fields. Besides using the hay to feed the horses, Windridge uses the hay to re-seed the fields, erosion control and a way to add back organic materials. Windridge takes soil samples once a year and follows the county agent's recommendations when to fertilize and lime.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 17

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Windridge is equipped with a covered arena, two sets of sensory trails, and 5 acres of pasture land that we utilize for our equine-assisted activities and therapies. The arena has mounting ramps at one end. The ramps are made of concrete and have a dirt floor where the horses are lead through to allow the rider to mount. The ground in the arena is dirt which has been treated with arena RX to reduce the amount of dust produced when people and horses are walking in the arena. The sensory trails and 5 acres of pasture land both have an all-natural ground. These areas have been specifically pick for equine activities based on the safety of the location and access to these areas from the main facility. All areas are checked weekly for any structural changes such as a down fence or tree.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Windridge is a premier accredited facility with the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International or PATH.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Windridge performs a tack check each month to insure the available tack is still in working condition for the horses and riders. Also, tack is cleaned and oiled weekly to insure the tack is also seen on a weekly basis and cleaned for the next horse which the tack will be used on.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Windridge horses have specific bridle, halter, and breast collar (if needed) assignments. Saddles, girths, and pads are communal among the horses and riders. Each horse has been assessed with the different saddles available to see which saddles fit the horses appropriately and can be used for a rider when riding that particular horse. The same has been done with the different pads available to see what is appropriate for each horse.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Windridge personnel and volunteers are taught to identify the horses with several methods. They are taught equine colors, markings and distinguishing marks such as scars, brands, and hair colics and whirls. Breed types are taught and personnel and volunteers learn to identify the horses by breed types. All personnel are responsible for learning to identify each horse out in the fields by counting head, naming off each horse and being able to identify them by their color and markings. Also, when each horse comes into the stable area to enter their stalls personnel is charged with looking at the horse's overall mannerisms, gait, both eyes and all four legs which in turn causes the individual to view both sides of the horse's body for injuries.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     At Windridge, the horses are stalled for class times or for medical reasons. Otherwise, the horses are turned out to pasture for the night, lunch, and for the entire weekend after Saturday classes are completed.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Windridge personnel has worked closely with our Purina dealer in the type of feed the horses should receive in accordance to the overall health, body condition and the type of activity or work schedule for each horse. In fact, our Purina dealer visits Windridge to evaluate our horses and pastures. The dealer also tests our hay. Roughage, concentrates and supplements are in accordance to our veterinarian and Purina dealer's suggestions. Our feeds and supplements are stored in a dry wooden feed box, constructed to eliminate rodents and located in our tackroom that is managed for humidity. We do not store sacks of grain. Our hay is stored on pallets in a well-ventilated, clean area.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Windridge's horses are evaluated annually by our veterinarian for general health, body conditioning and soundness. The Henneke Body Conditioning Score is used by our veterinarian, who is well-versed in this practice especially since the Henneke Body Conditioning Score was developed at Texas A&M and our veterinarian is a graduate of this institution. In fact, each of Windridge's previous veterinarians is graduates of Texas A&M. In fact, Windridge's previous veterinarians taught Windridge personnel how to use this method. Windridge personnel evaluate the horses body conditioning on an on-going basis and make adjustments to forage intake, amount of concentrates provided as well as level of conditioning for the desired work expected.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Windridge's disease control plan includes medical professionals and the veterinarian. On an annual basis policies and procedures are discussed, evaluated and adjusted as needed or as situations arise. The following highlight our policies and procedures for the following. a. All Windridge personnel attend First Aid and CPR training once a year. Personnel are informed and taught the correct procedures to follow in the event of human air-borne diseases and how to eliminate possible blood or parasite transference. b. Blood transference and disposal of items. Human items are placed in a bio secure container and taken to the hospital for disposal. Items used with the horses such as syringes and needles are placed in a bio secure marked container and taken to the veterinarian clinic for disposal. c. Animal carcasses are buried ten to twelve feet. Burial locations are away from the facility. The veterinarian is notified in the event of a wild animal carcass is found. d. Parasites are controlled with agents that are not harmful to humans, horses, dogs and cats. Water troughs are cleaned and filled with fresh water approximately twice a week. Windridge's grounds do not encourage water to stand and become a breeding ground for insects. Standing water is eliminated as soon as possible. e. All manure from the stalls or paddocks is immediately dumped into a manure spreader positioned several hundred feet from the facility. The manure is spread in our outer lying fields twice a week. Fields are dragged twice a year or as needed and aerated once a year.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Windridge has established emergency policies and procedures that address several areas that constitute an emergency such as, unruly visitors, participants or family members, volunteers or personnel, neighbor dogs and/or wild animals, injury, fire and weather that is encountered in East Texas. These emergency procedures might include: a. Notifying local law enforcement, fire department, ambulance service, veterinarian and/or animal control. b. Emergency numbers are posted by phones in each office area. c. Windridge has designated locations for all individuals to go in the event of a fire, tornado or severe weather such as a lightning storm. Windridge has a storm shelter which all individuals can get into no matter the day of operations. d. Depending on the emergency, Windridge has written policies and procedures that are to be implemented for the well-being of the horses. e. All personnel, volunteers, program participants and horses practice emergency drills twice a year. Emergency drills are documented. f. Two portable human first-aid kits and one equine first-aid kit, with emergency numbers included, are located in marked areas for easy access. g. Six fire extinguishers are located throughout the facility and with equipment such as the welding machine. Fire extinguishers are serviced annually. Windridge has water hydrants strategically placed throughout the facility. h. Windridge's policies include three alternate routes off of the property in the event of a fire in the facility, its grounds or the woods and/or fields. i. Policies also include evacuation for the horses to one of three local rodeo grounds. j. First responders visit Windridge periodically to reacquaint themselves with our location and environment.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     Windridge has built in the following measures to help with the security of the horses and property. The following highlight the security Windridge has put in place: a. Windridge's entrance is accessed from a dead-end road. The physical location of our entrance assists Windridge personnel to monitor abnormal movement. b. One Windridge staff member lives on the opposite side of the property, which enables the horses to be viewed on the farthest end of the property. c. The road frontage, perimeter fencing is built out of pipe posts and rails and all gates around the perimeter of the facility have pad locks on them. d. All perimeter gates are locked when Windridge is closed for operations.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Upshur County Sheriff's Department Sheriff Anthony Betterton 405 N. Titus St. Gilmer, TX 75644 (903) 843-2541

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Safe Haven Equine Rescue 4994 FM 2088 Gilmer, TX 75644 (903) 762-1432 safehavenrescue@etex.net


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 01/09/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Clint Owens

Clinic Name: Owens Mobile Veterinary Services    Street: P.O. Box 192    City: Diana  State: TX    Zip: 75640

Phone: 903-402-9440    Email: ceowens09@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Casie Buck

     2. Instructor: Charlynn Bradford

     3. Instructor: Chris Stow

     4. Instructor: Dawn Martin

     5. Instructor: Debbie Dewkett

     6. Instructor: Sarah Rollish


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 19.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 19

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 24

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:All the horses that participate in Windridge's equine-assisted activities and therapy programs have been donated and remain with Windridge for the rest of their lives. Each horse participates in one or more of Windridge's programs and is schooled by Windridge's staff of therapeutic riding instructors. Manure is removed from stalls on a 6 day a week basis, on the seventh day the horses come in for grain and receive any medical care needed and then return to the fields for a day of rest. Windridge is equipped with a manure spreader, which is filled throughout the week and emptied when full by a trained staff member and spread in Windridge's fields. This keeps the cost of manure removal down, as well as, provides pasture maintenance for Windridge's fields. The training and schooling of Windridge's herd of horses is performed by Windridge's certified therapeutic riding instructors.

21 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 2 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

23 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 2 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

2 = Total of 2d-2f

21 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            21 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$15648     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$81     Bedding.

$3145     Veterinarian.

$7785     Farrier.

$1468     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$2032     Medications & Supplements.

$2589     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$33084     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$65832     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

7741     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $9
Question 3 ($65,832 ) divided by Question 4 (7741).

Average length of stay for an equine: 337 days
Question 4 (7741) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (23).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 72

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 54

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 49

4. What is the average wait list time? 13 Weeks(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 2.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 3

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 4

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 99%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed. Program participants are charged $65 per class time, a small portion of the actual cost of $75 per class time. Even so, no one is turned away due to an inability to pay for our services. 72% of the children, adults and veterans that participate in our programs cannot afford the weekly fee. Windridge awards them a full or partial scholarship without reservation.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Casie Buck

         *Facility Participation:

         Windridge Therapeutic Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Casie has her registered level certification in Therapeutic Riding from PATH, Intl.


     2. *Instructor: Charlynn Bradford

         *Facility Participation:

         Windridge Therapeutic Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1993

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Charlynn is certified at the Advanced level of PATH Intl. certification.


     3. *Instructor: Chris Stow

         *Facility Participation:

         Windridge Therapeutic Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2003

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Chris has his Registered Level Certification in Therapeutic Riding from PATH Intl. and is currently an Advanced Certification candidate.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2003

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Chris has his Level II Certification in Therapeutic Driving from PATH Intl.


     4. *Instructor: Dawn Martin

         *Facility Participation:

         Windridge Therapeutic Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1994

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Dawn has her Advanced Level Certification in Therapeutic Riding from PATH Intl.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2003

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Dawn has her Level II Certification in Therapeutic Driving from PATH Intl.


     5. *Instructor: Debbie Dewkett

         *Facility Participation:

         Windridge Therapeutic Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2004

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Debbie is certified at the registered level with PATH Intl. and is an advanced instructor candidate.


     6. *Instructor: Sarah Rollish

         *Facility Participation:

         Windridge Therapeutic Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Sarah has her Registered Level Certification in Therapeutic Riding from PATH Intl.