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Panther Creek Inspiration Ranch

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 05/01/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  MG Tindall

Employees:   Full-Time:  9  Part-Time:  7  Volunteers:  150

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. All volunteers and staff go through our Volunteer Orientation and Training process. Instructors are certified through the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH). Horse leaders attend an additional 3 week training for handling our horses as well as regular refresher courses. We have an employee handbook, safety manual, volunteer orientation manual, horse leader manual, release forms, job descriptions, annual dialogue (evaluations)

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  9

Number of Board Members:  22  Number of Voting Board Members:  15

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     THERAPEUTIC RIDING
Participants with a wide array of physical and cognitive disabilities are welcome to join this exceptional program. Therapeutic riding lessons are planned with the individual’s physical, social, educational, cognitive, and recreational goals in mind.

An integrated team that includes a PATH-certified instructor and dedicated volunteers work with the rider to promote the success, the freedom, and the dignity that can be experienced through therapeutic horsemanship. It is our passion to expand our clients’ abilities and help them to reach their greatest levels of independence.

Benefits of Therapeutic Riding:
Improvement in cognitive skills
Improvement in social skills
Improvement in behavioral skills
Increased emotional well-being
Reduction of sensory disorders
Increased self-esteem
Increased balance, motor control, and coordination
Increased focus and learning capacity
Increased physical strength
Lessons are designed with the individual rider's goals and needs in mind. Classes are 30-45 minutes in length and clients attend once a week. All potential participants undergo a comprehensive in-take process that involves completion of registration forms, which includes a physician's release form and an evaluation. Horses and students are matched to complement personality, ability and developmental needs of the client.

Therapeutic Riding serves people with, but are not limited to: Autism, Attention Deficit Disorder, Cerebral Palsy, Developmental Delay, Downs Syndrome, Hearing and Vision Impairment, Learning Disabilities, Multiple Sclerosis, Muscular Dystrophy, and Speech Delay.

EQUINE FACILITATED LEARNING
Participants engage in hands on learning that utilizes the horse as a partner in exploring positive development of communication, self-respect, confidence, trust, accountability, and conflict resolution. Sessions incorporate a variety of ground work and general horsemanship activities such as grooming, leading, and herd observation.
Participants include families of our riders, people struggling with depression and anxiety and women who were previously involved in human trafficking, to name a few.
Classes are led by PATH Intl. Certified Equine Instructors who collaborate with mental health, learning professionals, and community volunteers.

A SPECIAL PROGRAM OFFERED AT THE RANCH:
H.E.A.R.T
Hands on Equine Assisted Ranch Therapy is an innovative program for young teens that are living in a temporary group home. The H.E.A.R.T program strives to create: positive youth engagement, foster social integration, build life skills, and help to create a sense of belonging. The goal is for these special teens to incorporate program elements in their daily lives so they can be healthy, happy and ultimately productive members of society.

In addition to the above programs, we offer summer camps for our riders and their siblings. These are 4 day programs that run for 3 weeks.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. N/A

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Inspiration Ranch promotes the use of natural horsemanship. Our horses are not shoed, receive the best of vet and chiropractic care and live in a natural environment similar to life in the wild. They live as a herd on an infinity track with hay and clean water available 24/7. Horses are checked regularly and assessed for their ability to partner with clients each day. Records are kept on each individual horse that include papers, vet records, chiropractic records, any medical needs, vaccines, Coggins, etc.
We use the Parelli training method and have regular times of play and schooling. Monday and Tuesday mornings are set aside (no lessons) for schooling.
Horses are carefully matched with the clients they partner with. Each horse does a maximum of 2-3 lessons per day, no longer than 3 hours per day, 4 days a week. We realize that the therapeutic horses are prone to stress, so we make sure that they are given time to be with the herd and to play with their barn buddies and trainers. We have designated horse people for morning and afternoons of each session, a full time equine manager and a part time assistant. Horses are groomed, placed on the TheraPlates and ridden by our riding team on a regular basis.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Our horses are acquired through donations, purchases and rescues. We will only take a horse if we are able to have a minimum of 90 days for trial. Each horse is evaluated before they are brought onto the property and then are left in quarantine area our vet and equine manager have cleared them. We assess each equine for its ability to do the job of a therapy horse during this time. Once a decision has been made to accept a horse into the program, the final donation or sale papers are completed.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     If it becomes apparent that a horse can not longer do the job of being a therapeutic lesson horse, we carefully screen to find a new home. Our first choice is to find a home with someone that we know, either a volunteer or staff member, or someone affiliated with the ranch that we have seen handle horses. The potential new owners would be screened and interviewed along with providing information on the new facility the horse would be taken to. We keep in touch with any horse that has been retired and ask that they give us the opportunity to take the horse back if they decide to re-home the horse for any reason.
We currently have two older horses who are retired from the program and our hope is to keep them with us now that their job is done. These horses, along with any of our therapy horses have served our clients well and we want to respect them in their retirement.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     It is our policy to look at horses who are in current and regular work, are arena savvy, are located within 100 miles of our facility, have current vet records, including current Coggins test available and the owner is willing to do a minimum of a 90 day trial. Once these are established an initial assessment that includes the following is made.

Introductory Screening Process for Prospective Equines is as follows:

All potential therapy horses will be evaluated according to the standards below. If the horses pass the initial evaluation, they will be placed on a 90 day trial period. They will be evaluated after 30 days, and again at the end of the 90 days. Throughout the 90 day trial period, the horses will begin to be used in the sessions, progressing up to a full work load. After the horses pass all three of these evaluations they will be accepted for donation.

1. Sound and in good health
2. Between 14 and 16 hands
3. No more than 20 years old
4. Has a strong work ethic and has been in consistent work
5. Demonstrates a good temperament towards people and other horses
6. Has a calm, willing, and pleasant personality
7. No behavioral vices, including kicking, biting, and aggression towards people
8. High level of tolerance to external influences (wind, sudden movements, loud noises)
9. Accept: loud noises from rider, erratic/unbalanced rider movement, balls/rings/cones
10. Minimal flight response with and without leader
11. Willing to accept side walkers and horse leaders
12. Well-trained for beginner riders
a. Able to be independently ridden by beginner rider
b. Stands quietly when tied
c. Stands quietly during mounting and dismounting from ground, steps, and platform
d. Smooth transitions at walk, trot, and canter
13. Lunges in both directions
14. Obeys voice commands
15. Able to be led from both sides

Once a horse is brought onto the property, they are quarantined until the vet and the equine manager agree that they are healthy and safe to introduce to the herd

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Inspiration Ranch Therapy Horses are monitored and evaluated daily for any wounds, lameness or ailments by the Equine Manager. Our horses receive annual shots in the Spring (Flu-Rhino, West Nile, Rabies) and Fall (Strangles, VEWT-4 way and take Coggins Tests in November).

Horses are checked bi-yearly for dentals and receive dental floats once a year or as needed. We preform random fecal tests quarterly and treat accordingly. We do not do a blanket deworming on the rotation, we only deworm when needed which ends up being about 3 times a year or as the individual needs deworming according to fecal tests. Sheaths are cleaned as needed.

Chiropractic care is provided Quarterly for the horses in our programs. Horses who have arthritis or need increased circulation/muscular stimulation spend time several times a week on our TheraPlates. Our horses are trimmed by a barefoot trimmer every 4 weeks and as needed if before the set schedule.

Our Senior (geriatric) horses receive specialized senior diets and eat 3 times a day while having forage available 24/7. Horses with individual health issues are monitored and treated as needed for superior care. For example, we have a horse with Moon Blindness and he is kept with a sunscreen fly mask to protect his eyes. Another example of individual care would be the special diets needed for the few horses that have Anhidrosis.

All horses receive individualized diets according to personal needs. Organic Vitamins and Minerals, Grass/Alfalfa pellets and access to forage 24/7 for optimum natural digestion. The Equine Manager monitors horses who are at risk for ulcers for behavior and physical changes on a daily basis. None of our horses have serious or life-threatening issues at this time.

All horses have their own personal Health and Exercise Binder that houses all of the vet visits, routine maintenance and details for that individual horse. Special care is taken to assess the horses "Horsenality" and their physical and psychological needs are matched according to personality.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     We would never euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space. Euthanizing a horse would be one of the most difficult decisions to make, but we would consider what was best for the horse.
Some reasons might include:
Incurable, progressive disease
Incurable, transmissible disease
Chronic lameness
Inoperable colic
Debilitation in old age
Severe traumatic injury
Undue suffering for any reason
Every case is unique and every horse is considered individually according to their psychological makeup and pain tolerance.

Other considerations are:
What is the likelihood of recovery or at least an acceptable return to usefulness?
Is the horse suffering?
Has the horse become depressed or despondent, or does it continue to show an interest and desire to live?
What are the alternatives?

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     N/A
Inspiration does not have a breeding program

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Panther Creek Inspiration Ranch

25902 Glen Loch Dr Spring TX 77380

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: MG Tindall

2. Contact's Phone: 281-719-9322

3. Contact's Email: mg@inspirationranch.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 5.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 20

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. 1 mile infinity track 200x100 open arena 200x110 covered arena 2 paddocks that are 1 acre each 2 paddock that is .5 acre 4 12x14 stalls Parelli play area 3 run in sheds several grazing areas 1 .5 acre quarantine area 5 acres of trails and turn out

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Our horses live as a herd on the infinity track. The paddocks are used when horses are brought up for lessons or for grazing. Horses are provided with fresh water in all areas as well as fresh forage 24/7

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 19

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     We have a 200 x 110 covered arena with a tacking area, tack room, seating area for parents and guests, loading dock and 4 stalls. 90% of the riding is done in this area. When horses are being trained, they may be taken off site for trail rides in the neighborhood or ridden on the trails on our property.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Inspiration Ranch is a Premier Accredited Center for PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship)

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     We have a 2017 5 horse trailer a 2 horse trail a 3 horse trailer trucks to pull each trailer

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Tack is assessed daily by both the designated horse person and the certified instructor at the time of use. Quarterly we do a complete examination of all tack as well as re-fit tack for each of the horses

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Our horses are all given a "horsinality" test. This information is posted and taught to volunteers an staff as they train with the horses. Each grooming bucket has a photo of the horse along with some of it personality traits. Feeding stalls are named. There are photos on the bulletin boards under the arena that identify each of the horses.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     We do not have any horses that are stall bounded unless they are under medical care. Our horses live on our infinity track. If a horse is in quarantine for any reason, the horse is grazed several times a day as well as supplied with 24/7 forage and fresh water.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Our Senior (geriatric) horses receive specialized senior diets and eat 3 times a day while having forage available 24/7. Horses with individual health issues are monitored and treated as needed for superior care. For example, we have a horse with Moon Blindness and he is kept with a sunscreen fly mask to protect his eyes. Another example of individual care would be the special diets needed for the few horses who have Anhidrosis. All horses receive individualized diets according to personal needs. Organic Vitamins and Minerals, Grass/Alfalfa pellets and access to forage 24/7 for optimum natural digestion. The Equine Manager monitors horses who are at risk for ulcers for behavior and physical changes on a daily basis.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     If a horse is showing excess weight, the horse will be taken off the track and placed in a small paddock adjacent to the track an placed on a lower calorie forage. They are exercised accordingly. Our senior horses are fed a high quality senior feed in order to maintain weight. All of our horses are exercised regularly and are monitored for healthy weight.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     The following is our Manure Maintenance Policy: • Prevent surface water contamination • Parasite control • Fly breeding • Stave off spread of disease • Odor control • Protect hoof worm from decomposition & bacteria SOLUTIONS: Use it/Give it/Haul it • Landscapers, nurseries, gardeners, parks • Compost it and use it to fertilize our own pastures as we grow and rotate for grass growth. Provides Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Potassium. COLLECTION: 2 Options • Remove daily and compost • Remove daily and spread on land-not a good choice for our size of acreage and climate. WHERE: Manure needs to be stored 150 ft. away from water source. (i.e.: well, creek, pond) TIMING: Daily collection of manure in paddocks, stalls, and arena – disposed of and dumped in a bin designed specifically for manure. 3 steps: 1. Daily collection from paddocks into nearby “holding pile” 2. 2x weekly-put in bins 3. 1-2x weekly-turning of pile with tractor Ideally, will be picked up and hauled in wheel barrows to location designated for immediate and quick dumping. Then a couple of times/week picked up with tractor and moved to recycling bins. The days it is hauled to bins, the tractor can turn the pile for correct fermentation and cover the pile with a tarp. IDEAL: 3 Bins! • 3 month-6 month if we keep the manure that long assuming a gardener or landscaper does not pick it up. • Long term goal: To have manure “cooking” and ready for pick up in bin that has a sweet smell to it and no offensive odor!!

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     The following is our evacuation policy: Inspiration Ranch Equine Emergency Evacuation Procedures When severe weather occurs and there is threat of flooding to the property here at Panther Creek Inspiration Ranch, evacuation must take place. President, MG Tindall and Tommy Middleton monitor the rising creek to the north of the property via live camera on her computer, on and from off site gages. The Equine Manager, Krista, lives ¼ mile from the ranch and can physically monitor the rising of water also. Should the water in the north creek begins to rise to the top of the bridge, an emergency evacuation will be called into action. Tommy and Laura will be notified of the situation. Krista will notify Lynne and Perry Waymire, the owner of the property the ranch horses will evacuate to; permission for transport to this property has already been discussed and agreed upon verbally by the two parties. There are currently 15 horses to move off property during an Emergency Evacuation. A phone call tree will begin with Krista calling Jenifer Drake and she will call the next staff member on the list. If someone does not answer on the list, please call the next person until you get an answer. Text messages are acceptable also. The Evacuation Team will meet at the Ranch ASAP and begin bringing up the horses into the arena for safe keeping until they are ready to be removed from the property. Designated Staff (see below) will collect 15 buckets, a minimum of 30 hay bags, 16 bales of hay, extra lead ropes, halters and Emergency First Aid Kits from the BarnWah area. Facility Ranch Hands and other staff will load all of the supplies, hay, feed and necessities into the trucks and trailers. Wheelbarrow, 2 Picks, shovel, Water troughs will all be put into the trucks and secured. Hay must be in dry safe location: Put hay inside the “tack rooms” of the horse trailers. Once every thing has been loaded into the trucks or trailers and Jen and Krista are present, Krista and Jen will be loading the horses then the hauling will begin. It is planned ahead that only Krista, Jen and one other appointed person will load the horses on to the trailer. Training for this process is required for the loading of the horses. (If one of the designated loaders of horses is not present, MG or Tommy will stand in on the loading process) It will take 2 trips with 3 trailers to get all horses to property. Approximate time to go through this process is 1-3 hours, depending on weather and how circumstances present themselves. When horses are secured at Evacuation Site, inventory will be taken to see if any other supplies are needed for the safety and security of the horses. Phone Tree is as follows: Phone Numbers of Evacuation Team: NOTE-phone numbers and addresses of evacuation sites have been eliminated from this application. In addition, Saint Simon and Jude church, one block from the ranch is a designated evacuation site for any staff, volunteers, clients or visitors that might be on the property.Saint Simon and Jude is a Red Cross facility. Horses can also be moved there and placed in the outdoor sports area if needed. Emergency drills are practiced once a quarter with clients, volunteers and staff. These include emergency dismounts, shelter in place and how to contact police, fire and ambulance from our emergency phone system. The Fire Department is located less than 2 miles from Inspiration Ranch and annually helps us with risk assessment. All of our staff is certified in first aid and use of AED defibrillators.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The entire property is fenced and there is a 10 foot electric gate on the drive. In addition to the fencing, there is a 25 foot tree line between the property and the road.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Montgomery County Animal Control Authority Animal Cruelty Investigator 8535 Hwy. 242 Conroe, Texas 77385 Dispatch: 936-442-7738 (Press 2) Fax: 936-442-7739

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     PATH PO Box 33150 Denver, CO 80233 Voice: (800) 369-7433 or (303) 452-1212 Fax: (303) 252-4610 Parelli 7 Parelli Way, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147 PO Box 3729, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147 970-731-9400


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/27/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Christianson

Clinic Name: Equine Veterinary Association    Street: 14920 FM 2854    City: Magnollia  State: TX    Zip: 77316

Phone: 936-273-1410    Email: nfo@evaconroe.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Amy Nelson

     2. Instructor: Greg Sokoloski

     3. Instructor: Jen Drake

     4. Instructor: Krista Carroll

     5. Instructor: Laura Dorcas


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 15.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 15

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 18

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Dental cost is at $0 because it is donated by one of our board members who is a vet. Bedding cost is included in horse/barn supplies - it is not a line item we keep separate. Equine Manager and Trainer are the same person. Our Instructors are also level 2 Parelli and train our horses, but I did not include their salary as instructed above.

15 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 0 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

15 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

0 = Total of 2d-2f

15 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            15 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$27376     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$21485     Veterinarian.

$4575     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$1300     Manure Removal.

$17728     Medications & Supplements.

$6492     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$47500     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$3813     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$130269     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

5475     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $24
Question 3 ($130,269 ) divided by Question 4 (5475).

Average length of stay for an equine: 365 days
Question 4 (5475) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (15).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? No

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 85

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 40

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 42

4. What is the average wait list time? 7 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 2.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 3

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 4

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 80%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Amy Nelson

         *Facility Participation:

         Panther Creek Inspiration Ranch

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Certified Instructor to teach riding to those with special needs

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Amy became involved at the ranch at the age of 15 when she began to volunteer. Her sister was and still is riding with us. She became a certified instructor as soon as she was eligible. She is a full time instructor for the ranch since this past January.


     2. *Instructor: Greg Sokoloski

         *Facility Participation:

         Panther Creek Inspiration Ranch

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Parelli

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.method of horse training

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Natural Hoof Care

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.barefoot trimming


     3. *Instructor: Jen Drake

         *Facility Participation:

         Panther Creek Inspiration Ranch

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Certified to teach ridding lessons to people with special needs

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Jen has been volunteering for Inspiration Ranch for 5 years. She started the process of certification 2.5 years ago and completed her certification in the summer of 2016. Jen has been working full time for the ranch since January


     4. *Instructor: Krista Carroll

         *Facility Participation:

         Panther Creek Inspiration Ranch

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Certified Instructor to teach riding to people with special needs

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Specialist - certified for ground programs

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Krista has 37 years of experience with horses and has been teaching for 21 years. She has served as our Equine Manager and a Certified Instructor for the past 6 years. Krista will begin the role of Equine Assisted Learning Program Director this month as we begin to grow our ground and mental health programs for families and the community.


     5. *Instructor: Laura Dorcas

         *Facility Participation:

         Panther Creek Inspiration Ranch

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Certified Instructor to teach riding lessons to those with special needs

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Laura was a certified instructor with PATH for several years. She left instructing to teach in the school system for several years and recently made the decision to come back to teaching riding. She re-certified with PATH as currently serves as our Program Director