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High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc.

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/26/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Kitty Stalsburg

Employees:   Full-Time:  12  Part-Time:  12  Volunteers:  637

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. All employees are given a Procedures and Policies manual and orientation at the start of their employment and this covers all emergency and risk management procedures for the facility, herd, staff, participants and visitors. Employees are required to read and sign the risk management binder once a year to be kept up to date on changes in policies and procedures. Every staff position has a comprehensive job description and are evaluating on job performance on a quarterly basis during the fiscal year. A year end review is given both orally and in writing and upcoming goals for the next fiscal year are established at that time. All volunteers are required to attend a 4 hour training session prior to their active volunteer service. Volunteers are then given additional training specific to the areas they will be assisting in - horse leading, barn help, sidewalking. During the quieter winter months a volunteer enrichment program of lectures and demonstration are provided at no cost. These sessions can include information on horse handling and education for working with individuals with specific disabilities. All volunteers are given a handbook that contains High Hopes policies and procedures.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  5

Number of Board Members:  22  Number of Voting Board Members:  18

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     High Hopes programs and services include therapeutic riding lessons, unmounted equine learning programs, carriage driving, summer camps, instructor training certification courses, on-site workshops and other educational opportunities.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 2

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. n/a

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Every horse under High Hopes care receives constant evaluations to determine to on-going suitability within the program. When a horse shows signs of physical or mental fatigue we take steps to correct the problem. Physical issues are addressed after consultation with our veterinary provider and the horse will not be returned to the program until the physical condition is resolved. Horses that show signs of being unhappy with their work are first evaluated to see if there is an underlying physical problem that needs to be addressed. If that is not the case then we look to see how the horse is being handled and if changes can be made to make the horse more comfortable. If after all these steps have been taken and the horse is still not able to work then steps will be taken to retire the horse and its placement will maximize the future humane care and protection of the horse. In the case of a free lease the horse will be returned to its owners care, if feasible. In the case of donated and purchased horses High Hopes will seek to place the horse in the appropriate care of a new party and ownership is transferred to that party. In some cases once a horse retires from High Hopes program its ownership cannot be transferred and its on-going care will be borne by High Hopes either at its own facility or if possible at Mitchell Farms, an equine retirement facility in Salem, CT. To ensure that our retired horses receive the best possible care High Hopes has established an Equine Care Fund and actively raises money to support this program. Money from the Equine Care Fund ensures that High Hopes can provide the best possible care for our horses until their last days, without impacting our on-going programs costs.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Our horses are acquired primarily via donation from private donors, although occasionally we free lease horses from private owners or purchase horses to fill a need that cannot be met by horses offered for donation or free lease.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Horses are slated for retirement after assessment by equine and riding program staff and our veterinarian who deem the horse no longer suitable for participation on our programs, whether for health, soundness or behavioral concerns. Horses are then either returned to their original owner (who have asked for right of first refusal in the case of donation or who have maintained ownership in the the case of free lease) or are placed in appropriate retirement homes (such as Mitchell Farm Equine Retirement, Inc in Salem CT or in private homes (often with staff or volunteers). Horses who we have purchased that still have potential for careers in other disciplines may be resold, donated horses are never sold.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     All prospective horses undergo an extensive screening process that begins with training and health questionnaires completed by the owner, followed by a staff visit to the location where the horse lives that includes both mounted and unmounted evaluations of the horse’s soundness and behavioral appropriateness. If the horse meets expectations in these initial screenings, he/she will come to High Hopes for a trial evaluation period of up to 90 days where the horse undergoes screening that includes all areas from soundness, ground manners, ground schooling training (lungeing, round pen), mounted behavior and training, trail behavior, behavior in mock therapeutic riding session with staff, etc.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Our horses receive routine veterinary care (annual physical exams and vaccines, supplemented with veterinary care to address chronic or acute health care concerns as needed), dental care (at least annual floating/dental exams supplemented as needed to address chronic or acute dental issues), parasite control ( fecal flotation exams 6 times per year, deworming based on fecal flotation results and once yearly deworming for the whole herd to manage any tape worm infestation) and hoof care (every 6 weeks). Vaccines are administered at the recommendation of our veterinarian taking into consideration risk potential for our area and based on the health concerns of our herd. The horses are evaluated for illness multiple times per day by visual and behavioral evaluation by staff. Horses with chronic illness issues (lameness, PPID, etc) or who are in at-risk populations (geriatric, etc) are under the ongoing care of our veterinarian and are monitored by farm staff daily. Special consideration (fans/cool hosing, blankets) is given in extreme weather conditions (heat, cold) to ensure all horses are tolerating them.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Horses are only euthanized in the circumstances of acute health issues (severe colic or other health concern that is causing unmanageable pain and suffering) or where quality of life has deteriorated due to age or health concerns, always under the advisement of our veterinarian. Horses are never euthanized to make space or as a resolution for training or behavioral challenges.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     High Hopes does not breed horses. We are not permitted to house stallions on our property per PATH International guidelines.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training? 
     n/a

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. 
     n/a

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     n/a

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: $501 to $750

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  All equines have one set fee or donation amount.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: n/a



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 2

.

Location 1 of 2
High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

36 Town Woods Road Old Lyme CT 06371

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Holly Sundmacker

2. Contact's Phone: 860-434-1974

3. Contact's Email: hsundmacker@highhopestr.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 16.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 40

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. 12 paddocks and pastures varying in size from 1/2 acre to 5 acres, fenced with 3 rail split-rail wood fencing topped with one strand of electric rope fencing. Each enclosure has access to a three sided run-in shed. The run-in sheds vary in size from 12’x12’ to 36’x12’ depending on the number of horses that live in each enclosure and the size of each enclosure. The stall barn contains 21 10’x11’ stalls. Note that the horses live in turn out 24/7 and only come into the stall barn/stalls to prepare for work in our programs. Both the run-in sheds and stalls are lined with rubber stall mats and are bedded with wood shavings.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Our horses live in turn out 24/7. The horses are grouped by size, sex, social preferences and behavior, based on nutritional needs (ie: horses who can tolerate grazing on grass pasture and those that cannot), and are then assigned to paddocks/pastures based on the size of each paddock/pasture. Our enclosure vary in size and may accommodate 1 horse up to 6 horses depending on the size of the enclosure and the size of the run-in shed in each enclosure. The turf areas in each enclosure are cleaned of manure four times per week, the run-in sheds are cleaned at least as often but typically 5 times per week. The pastures/paddocks are mowed as needed and muddy areas are addressed with the use of processed stone products.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 22

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     We have two enclosed riding arenas. The indoor arena is 80’x200’ and contains a rubber and sand riding surface, exhaust fans, multiple doors that can be opened to allow fresh air in and natural light in. The outdoor riding arena is 100’x225’ and contains a rubber and sand riding surface. The footing choice for both arenas has served us well. It provides enough cushion and traction for the horses working on it, while still being easy for our volunteers (who are on foot beside the rider and horse) to travel on. The arenas only contain the equipment (ground poles, barrels, cones, etc) that is being used for the class being taught in the arena each day, mounting ramps are located outside of the riding area, the arenas are inspected for hazards daily and the footing is graded and maintained multiple times per week.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     High Hopes has Premier accreditation from the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, Internatinal (PATH Intl) and is fully compliant with all standards for facility and equine care/selection required for this accreditation. High Hopes is also certified by the Connecticut Horse Association. We have been recognized by the State of Connecticut for the past four years as a Farm of Environmental Distinction.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     We own our truck (2006 Chevy 2500 HD pick up truck) and trailer (2000 Hawk 2 horse bumper pull trailer) that are available for emergency horse transportation at any time.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Each horse has its own labeled bridle of a type appropriate for each horse (some in snaffle bridles, some in hackamore bridles). Saddles are numbered and each horse has multiple saddles that are fit to them by our Veterinary Chiropractor and Certified Saddler at least twice per year. Each day's saddle assignments are documented on our class assignment sheet (that also spells out rider, volunteer and instructor assignments each day). Tack and equipment are checked for fit and safety before each use by instructors and once per year by a Certified Saddler.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Each horse is identified through picture and physical description in several documents available to everyone, including a board showing each horse’s assigned turnout that is labeled with photos of each horse and stall cards for each horse that contains photographs and physical descriptions.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     The horses live in turnout 24/7 in groups (or in some cases individual turnout) based on each horse’s gender, dietary needs and social needs.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     All horses are fed second cut timothy mix grass hay fed free choice. All horses are supplemented with a multiple vitamin/mineral forage diet supplement. Some of the more senior horses are fed a complete senior feed to address their dentition and digestion needs. Horses are fed supplements only as directed by our veterinarian to address specific health concerns.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Horses are rated using the Henneke Body Condition Scoring system twice per year by our veterinarian to evaluate weight loss, gain or maintenance goals. The assigned scores are used to guide changes to feeding and exercising plans for each horse.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     To address the potential of the spread of disease within our herd, we ask that all volunteers and staff attending activities at High Hopes to change their shoes and clothes to ones that they have not worn to other farms. Prospective/trial horses are kept in isolation for 21 days. This isolation includes limiting access to staff only practicing hand washing techniques after contact, keeping the horse at a suitable distance from resident horses and using tools specifically for the trials horses that are kept separate from all other tools. Horses are checked for internal parasite infestation through fecal flotation exams and subsequent deworming at the advisement of our veterinarian. Manure is removed from the areas where horses live on a multiple time per week basis and is either piled for composting, removed from the grounds in dumpsters or is spread on non-grazed fields for fertilization. Carcass disposal is done by burial by a contractor using equipment suitable for reaching an appropriate burial depth and within legal limits of our county and state.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Accreditation through PATH International and CHA requires us to maintain extensive emergency preparedness plans that are updated routinely under the advisement of our fire marshal, state veterinary office, CT Department of Agriculture, and CT State emergency planning departments and that are reinforces with personnel via regular drills and review of the procedures. Our emergency planning includes plans to ensure the safety and care for people, horses and structures in situations ranging from natural disaster (tropical storms, hurricanes, brush fire, flood, Nor'easter and Blizzard) to hazards of our site (electric fence, pond, insects and dangerous animals inherent in our area) as well as man made hazards in our area (nuclear power plant, dangerous persons) and fire.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     High Hopes has a live in caretaker who provides security for the farm and horses during non-business hours. Our driveway is gated to limit access during non-business hours and there is prolific signage to discourage unauthorized access.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Animal Control Division, CT Department of Agriculture 165 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06106 Phone: (860) 713-2506 Fax: (860) 713-2515 Raymond Connors, Supervisor

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, International 7475 Dakin Street, suite 600 Denver, CO 80221 www.pathintl.org 800-369-7433


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 01/26/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Lara Gardner, DVM

Clinic Name: Gardner Equine    Street: P.O. Box 852    City: Killingworth  State: CT    Zip: 06419

Phone: 860-707-6744    Email: gardnerequine@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Anne Peterson

     2. Instructor: Barbara Abrams

     3. Instructor: Carolyn Jagielski

     4. Instructor: Carrie Wind

     5. Instructor: Courtney Bernard

     6. Instructor: Donna Latella

     7. Instructor: Holly Ridgway

     8. Instructor: Holly Sundmacker

     9. Instructor: Imanol Echeverria

     10. Instructor: Jonnie Edwards

     11. Instructor: Kate McCormick

     12. Instructor: Kerry Burke

     13. Instructor: Kitty Stalsburg

     14. Instructor: Lauren Fitzgerals

     15. Instructor: Megan Ellis

     16. Instructor: Sarah Carlson


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 25.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 25

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 30

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

25 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 0 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

25 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

0 = Total of 2d-2f

25 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            24 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            1 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$45000     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$4000     Bedding.

$20000     Veterinarian.

$13000     Farrier.

$2000     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$6000     Medications & Supplements.

$6000     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$36000     Horse Care Staff.

$34000     Horse Training.

$2500     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$168500     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

9013     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $19
Question 3 ($168,500 ) divided by Question 4 (9013).

Average length of stay for an equine: 361 days
Question 4 (9013) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (25).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-All of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 260

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 50

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 40

4. What is the average wait list time? 8 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 2.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 3

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 95%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.



Location 2 of 2
Camp Harkness

301 Great Neck Road Waterford CT 06385

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Meagan Ellis

2. Contact's Phone: 860-442-9608

3. Contact's Email: mellis@highhopestr.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Use

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Depatment of Developmental Services
State of CT
Vicki Severin, Camp Director
301 Great Neck Road
Waterford, CT 06385
860-443-7818

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     The written agreement is for six months of the year, June to November. This is a seasonal program. There will be no services this year after November. Services are expected to resume in 2017 with a new written agreement for six months.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     The facilities are owned and maintained by the state. We are contracted by the state to provide equine assisted services to campers who come to the facility through one of several programs run by outside agencies.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 2.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 5

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Three paddocks/pastures Wood post+board fencing Each enclosure has access to a three-sided shelter Stall barn contains 4 10x10 stalls Stall mats and wood shavings.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     PM turnout only due to insect activity at this site. Turned out within groups based on size, sex, social preferences and behavior, based on nutritional needs and are then assigned to paddock/pastures based on the size of each paddock/pasture.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 14

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Enclosed outdoor riding arena, with turf footing. The arenas only contain the equipment (ground poles, barrels, cones, etc) that is being used for the class being taught in the arena each day, mounting ramps are located outside of the riding area, the arenas are inspected for hazards daily and the footing is graded and maintained multiple times per week.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     High Hopes has Premier accreditation from the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, International (PATH Intl) and is fully compliant with all standards for facility and equine care/selection required for this accreditation. High Hopes is also certified by the Connecticut Horse Association. We have been recognized by the State of Connecticut for the past four years as a Farm of Environmental Distinction.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     We own our truck (2006 Chevy 2500 HD pick up truck) and trailer (2000 Hawk 2 horse bumper pull trailer) that are available for emergency horse transportation at any time.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Each horse has its own labeled bridle of a type appropriate for each horse (some in snaffle bridles, some in hackamore bridles). Saddles are numbered and each horse has multiple saddles that are fit to them by our Veterinary Chiropractor and Certified Saddler at least twice per year. Each day's saddle assignments are documented on our class assignment sheet (that also spells out rider, volunteer and instructor assignments each day). Tack and equipment are checked for fit and safety before each use by instructors and once per year by a Certified Saddler.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Each horse is identified through picture and physical description in several documents available to everyone, including a board showing each horse’s assigned turnout that is labeled with photos of each horse and stall cards for each horse that contains photographs and physical descriptions.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     The horses live in turnout 24/7 in groups (or in some cases individual turnout) based on each horse’s gender, dietary needs and social needs.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     All horses are fed second cut timothy mix grass hay fed free choice. All horses are supplemented with a multiple vitamin/mineral forage diet supplement. Some of the more senior horses are fed a complete senior feed to address their dentition and digestion needs. Horses are fed supplements only as directed by our veterinarian to address specific health concerns.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Horses are rated using the Henneke Body Condition Scoring system twice per year by our veterinarian to evaluate weight loss, gain or maintenance goals. The assigned scores are used to guide changes to feeding and exercising plans for each horse.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     To address the potential of the spread of disease within our herd, we ask that all volunteers and staff attending activities at High Hopes to change their shoes and clothes to ones that they have not worn to other farms. Prospective/trial horses are kept in isolation for 21 days. This isolation includes limiting access to staff only practicing hand washing techniques after contact, keeping the horse at a suitable distance from resident horses and using tools specifically for the trials horses that are kept separate from all other tools. Horses are checked for internal parasite infestation through fecal flotation exams and subsequent deworming at the advisement of our veterinarian. Manure is collected in a pile in a concrete bin with roof for retrieval in a dumpster at the end of the summer session. Carcass disposal is done by burial by a contractor using equipment suitable for reaching an appropriate burial depth and within legal limits of our county and state

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Accreditation through PATH International and CHA requires us to maintain extensive emergency preparedness plans that are updated routinely under the advisement of our fire marshal, state veterinary office, CT Department of Agriculture, and CT State emergency planning departments and that are reinforces with personnel via regular drills and review of the procedures. Our emergency planning includes plans to ensure the safety and care for people, horses and structures in situations ranging from natural disaster (tropical storms, hurricanes, brush fire, flood, Nor'easter and Blizzard) to hazards of our site (electric fence, pond, insects and dangerous animals inherent in our area) as well as man made hazards in our area (nuclear power plant, dangerous persons) and fire.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     An onsite security company monitors unauthorized access to the equestrian center at Camp Harkness after hours and weekends. There is no caretaker. There is prolific signage to discourage unauthorized access.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Animal Control Division, CT Department of Agriculture 165 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06106 Phone: (860) 713-2506 Fax: (860) 713-2515 Raymond Connors, Supervisor

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International 7475 Dakin Street, suite 600 Denver, CO 80221 800-369-7433 www.pathintl.org


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 06/01/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Lara Gardner, DVM

Clinic Name: Gardner Equine    Street: P.O. Box 852    City: Killingworth  State: CT    Zip: 06419

Phone: 860-707-6744    Email: gardnerequine@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Carrie Wind

     2. Instructor: Megan Ellis


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 2.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 2

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 5

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:The cost for horse care at the different sites is not differentiated. Therefore all costs are reflected in the High Hopes facility budget

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 0 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

2 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

0 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            2 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$1     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$0     Veterinarian.

$0     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$0     Medications & Supplements.

$0     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$1     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

112     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $0
Question 3 ($1 ) divided by Question 4 (112).

Average length of stay for an equine: 56 days
Question 4 (112) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (2).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-All of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 80

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 16

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 8

4. What is the average wait list time? 0 (Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 2.00  Un-Mounted: 2.00  Total: 4

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 75%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed. Assumes mounted includes carriage driving.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Anne Peterson

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH certified Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.ST of CT, Dept Public Health

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Licensed Professional Counselor

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Art Therapy Credentials Board, Inc.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.certified art therapist


     2. *Instructor: Barbara Abrams

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1997

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Advanced Level Instructor.

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Barbara Abrams also holds a PHD in Social Services and is a Licensed Professional Counselor.


     3. *Instructor: Carolyn Jagielski

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1995

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.American Hippotherapy Association

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1999

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Hippotherapy Clinical Specialist


     4. *Instructor: Carrie Wind

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

         Camp Harkness

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered instructor


     5. *Instructor: Courtney Bernard

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Instructor


     6. *Instructor: Donna Latella

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2006

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.4. Advance Level Instructor


     7. *Instructor: Holly Ridgway

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1992

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Advanced Instructor


     8. *Instructor: Holly Sundmacker

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Post University

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2003

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Bachelor of Science, Equine Studies & Management


     9. *Instructor: Imanol Echeverria

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Advanced Instructor


     10. *Instructor: Jonnie Edwards

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1992

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Advanced Instructor


     11. *Instructor: Kate McCormick

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH certified instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH ESMHL certified instructor

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Kate is also a certified Special Education Teacher (ages birth thru High School), Certified elementary school teacher, grades K-6 (since 2009), Therpeutic Crisis Intervention certified (August 2008) and Crisis Prevention Intervention Certified (August 2010)


     12. *Instructor: Kerry Burke

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Int'l Registered Instrutor


     13. *Instructor: Kitty Stalsburg

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1997

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Master Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning


     14. *Instructor: Lauren Fitzgerals

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2005

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Advanced Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Driving Level 1 Instructor


     15. *Instructor: Megan Ellis

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

         Camp Harkness

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2005

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH certified Advanced Instructor


     16. *Instructor: Sarah Carlson

         *Facility Participation:

         High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Advanced Instructor