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Forward Stride

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 05/04/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Jason Burdge

Employees:   Full-Time:  12  Part-Time:  19  Volunteers:  150

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. All employees receive 90 days of training by their supervisor and other related staff. All volunteers attend a two-hour training session, and then receive feedback and follow up training as needed.

Job Descriptions as follows:

Executive Director:
Lead team of 30 individuals ranging from licensed clinical rehabilitation therapists, certified PATH instructors, and program staff; oversee capital campaign project; create unique, participant-focused model of practice centered on inclusivity and prgram retention; manage $750,000 and growing operating budget; work with Board of Directors to create strategic plan and proper board governance standards

Associate Executive Director:
Train and manage riding instructors; train and manage equines; schedule classes and therapy sessions; manage facility; ensure compliance with industry and organizational standards; coach equestrians on- and off-site in regional and state qualifications; create and implement vaulting program; lunge vaulting horse for local, regional and national events, including multiple national championships

Director of Rehabilitation Services:
Conduct physical therapy sessions in a HIPPA-compliant environment; manage Rehab Services staff schedules and professional development

Manager of Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy (EFP) Program:
Administer psychotherapy sessions in HIPPA-compliant environment; manage EFP program staff schedules and professional development

Programs Manager:
Develop and oversee all programs and program coordinators; work with program staff to ensure highest-quality implementation; maintain organization accreditation

Development Coordinator:
Collaborate with Executive Director and other staff to build and sustain fundraising plans, manage donor database, share responsibility for establishing, cultivating, and managing relationships with major donors

Riding and Vocational Program Coordinator:
Create curriculum and levels for both programs; supervise vocational program interns; mentor and oversee staff instructors

Events and Intake Coordinator:
Plan and manage events; process donations; refine intake process for new clients

Communications Coordinator:
Create marketing materials, implement communications calendar, update and maintain online platforms

Volunteer Coordinator:
Supervise daily volunteer positions, recruit and place new volunteers, maintain training for existing volunteers

Accounts Coordinator:
Manage bookkeeping records, maintain day-to-day cashflow, oversee project cash management

Executive Assistant/Development Assistant:
Assist Executive Director (ED) and Development Coordinator (DC) in the development and implementation of fundraising, coordinate with ED and DC in meetings and cultivation activities

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  11

Number of Board Members:  7  Number of Voting Board Members:  7

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes

Additional Comments:
All board members make financial contributions and volunteer at events as needed. Board members reach out to their contacts and community to support Forward Stride in general and to identify individuals that should be involved.

The board’s Treasurer has access to all financial tracking software and bank accounts
The Treasurer heads the finance committee composed of other board members and external advisors
The Treasurer provides a report to the entire board at each board meeting and provides their feedback independent to the E.D.’s report
The board updated its overall financial oversight roles in 2016 and established key amounts that require board involvement in general operations and in building the new facility
The board also conducts meeting as needed in person and by phone when immediate topics arise
In Q4 of 2016 the board reanalyzed their board recruitment process and created new role descriptions, core competencies, and recruitment materials
An onboarding process was created that includes a learning curriculum prior to new members taking on committee roles
The board President is working on an evaluation process beyond term limit renewal analysis


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 90

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Our Inclusive Riding Program offers children and adults of all abilities opportunities to develop horsemanship skills, fitness, communication, social skills and self-confidence. Inclusion within the Riding Program is what makes growth and healing a success beyond direct clinical services and learning basic riding skills. All riders are placed in lessons based on their shared abilities and current riding levels, rather than their disabilities. In this way, everyone focuses on overcoming shared challenges together and building on one another’s strengths.
Our Clinical Services Program offers people of all age’s sessions with licensed physical, speech and language, occupational or mental health therapists who specialize in using equine movement or behavior as a treatment tool in integrated treatment plans. This program includes:
Hippotherapy - This approach is provided by a specially trained physical therapist, physical therapy assistant, occupational therapist, certified occupational therapy assistant, or speech and language pathologist. This strategy is typically used as part of an integrated treatment program to achieve specific improvements in functional outcomes and has been shown to improve muscle tone, balance, posture, coordination, and motor development, as well as emotional well-being.
Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP) – This approach is a collaborative effort between a licensed mental health professional and a horse professional designed to address specific treatment issues presented by a psychotherapy client.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. Our Inclusive Volunteer Program is more than a vital element of our operations; our volunteers are a crucial component of our Continuum of Care. All of our programs utilize our robust volunteer community of 175 dedicated individuals who staff 140 hours of work per week. Many choose Forward Stride to support their personal, social, and psychological well-being.
Our Inclusive Equine-Assisted Learning (EAL) is an experiential learning approach that promotes the development of life skills for educational, professional, and personal goals through equine-assisted activities. Learning activities can be used to re-engage individuals in academic learning, increase one’s ability to build and maintain positive relationships, and decrease symptoms of stress and anxiety.
EAL includes our newest program 99 Hands, a vocational training program for young adults ages 18 - 24. Individuals in this program receive paid vocational training in barn management, horse training, and landscaping. 99 Hands is designed for individuals who have particular challenges, such as autism and developmental/emotional disorders. Participants receive individualized training, based on their abilities and goals, to prepare them to enter the general workforce along with EAL skills.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Our entire organization is centered on a commitment to excellence encompassing not only service to our clientele, but also to our horses. Our horses are closely monitored for physical health and well being, and their needs are addressed on a daily basis by our Equine and Program Coordinators. We also have an onsite tenant that provides night time supervision. We enjoy comprehensive pro bono horse care services including numerous veterinarians (please see our website for names), an equine chiropractic and acupuncture practitioner and equine massage therapists. Additionally, we purchase the services of an excellent farrier.
In many cases, Forward Stride’s own horse care standards exceed the standards outlined by PATH as our philosophy is to give the best possible care to our horses while keeping them in their most natural environment.
In the wild, horses live in a free-roaming herd and graze almost constantly throughout the day. At Forward Stride, all the horses are turned out into large paddocks with their herd mates daily. We view turnout as one of nature’s best forms of exercise for horses. We have thirteen separate, permanently fenced paddocks. For safety, we limit our paddock herd size to a maximum of four, and rarely move horses into different herd groups. For protection against the elements, the horses wear warm blankets and rain sheets in the winter, and fly masks, fly sheets and/or fly spray in the summer months.
Forward Stride maintains the herd atmosphere in the evening when horses return to their stalls by ensuring all horses can hang their heads out of the stalls.

Horse usage is planned and tracked daily, and is overseen by our Equine and Program Coordinators, who work together to make certain no horse is being overused. It is our policy that the equines are used no more than three hours in a day and no more than two hours at a time. There are occasionally exceptions to this rule because of equine soundness or illness or because of competitions or special events. Most horses have one day off unless they perform better when used lightly every day (for example, some equines with low grade arthritis do better without a day off). No equine is ever worked more than 6 hours per day or more than 3 hours in a row.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Our horses are donated and purchased. We also offer a care-lease and half-lease of horses that are privately owned.

We never accept horses under surrender, seizure, or return.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Horses that are leased to us, at any time Forward Stride can deem a horse unsatisfactory for any reason for continued use in our program.
The owner then has 30 days to move their horse to a new facility.

For horses that are owned by Forward Stride, if we deem unsatisfactory for our program and decide to retire them, those horses are under our care for the entire length of time necessary to find them a new home for retirement. We include a first right of refusal for all horses that we sell.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     All horses go through a 30 day trial to determine if they are sound, healthy, and suitable for the job in our program.
In that 30 days, staff and advanced riders will ride the horses. All horses go through a pre-purchase exam by a different veterinarian used by the owner to eliminate biases. All horses spend that 30 days in a quarantine pasture.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     The feeding regimen for Forward Stride horses consists of hay and grain in the morning, limited grazing throughout the day, and hay and grain with supplements in the evening. Each horse has their own personalized diet that is developed by our experienced Equine Coordinator. The horses always have access to water and have salt licks in their stalls and paddocks. We feed only high quality hay, and closely monitor our horses’ weights and coat patterns to ensure our horses are receiving the best possible nutrition.
We perform fecal counts for all horses twice a year, and worm as needed. Vaccinations are completed as recommended by our veterinarian.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     We euthanize a horse if it is medically necessary, and recommended by a veterinarian.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     No breeding occurs at our facility.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     Yes

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. 
     Horses are sold to a private party. We sell horses when they are deemed unfit for the programs, such as showing behavior that is unsafe for our clients. These horses are exhibiting frustration and no longer happy with their job, and we seek them a new happy home/job.

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: We do not participate in equine adoption.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Forward Stride

18218 SW Horse Tale Drive Beaverton OR 97007

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Claire Campbell

2. Contact's Phone: 5035902959

3. Contact's Email: claire.campbell@forwardstride.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Metro Land Group
17933 NW Evergreen Pkwy # 300, Beaverton, OR 97006
Phone: (503) 597-7100

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     December 2007-August 2017 We are building a new facility on a property that we purchased, in the middle of a Capitol Campaign to raise funds.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     n/a

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 6.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 17

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. We have fifteen separate, permanently fenced paddocks. Each pasture is approximately one acre. In the evening when horses return to their 10'x 12' stalls by ensuring all horses can hang their heads out of the stalls.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     For safety, we limit our paddock herd size to a maximum of four, and rarely move horses into different herd groups.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 6

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     We operate out of two separate indoor arenas. Our largest arena 60'x 100' has a dirt footing that is tilled and leveled weekly. Our smaller arena is 40'x 80' with equal footing as large arena. We have a mini arena that is 20'x 30' with a sand footing. Every arena has full length lights, and overhead watering system for dust control.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     PATH Int. 32993

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     We have 6 horse trailers on site. We have a written plan that everyone is trained to. It outlines the procedure to deal with specific hazards, evacuation plans ect.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     We have our Program Manager and Associate Director who are full time employees that oversee the fitting and assignment of all equipment used by each horse. We have a color coding and individual hangers with pictures and names of each horse, to which their tack and grooming equipment is stored. We have an up-to-date list of what saddles and necessary pads are approved for each horse. Volunteers check this list, each time, prior to a lesson. Every horse has it's own assigned halter and lead rope. Each horse has it's own assigned and fitted turn-out blanket or sheet.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     In our common space of the barn we have a pasture map and a stall map. Each pasture and stall is given a number. The names of the horses are on each pasture map, and stall map. Each stall has a stall name card, in addition to a horse info sheet. On this sheet we have name, age, breed, owner info, veterinarian, feeding regiment, and pasture assigned to. On each gate of the pastures we have the number assigned to that pasture and the names of the horses that are assigned to that pasture.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     We have 3 small turnouts that are hogs-fuel footing, approximately 20'x20' in size that any horse placed on our "hospital watch" list will be turned out alone into. They spend the same six hours a day in pasture.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     The feeding regimen for Forward Stride horses consists of hay and grain in the morning, limited grazing throughout the day, and hay and grain with supplements in the evening. Each horse has their own personalized diet that is developed by our experienced Equine Coordinator. The horses always have access to water and have salt licks in their stalls and paddocks. We feed only high quality hay, and closely monitor our horses’ weights and coat patterns to ensure our horses are receiving the best possible nutrition.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     We work diligently to keep all horses between the optimum range of 5-7 score. If a horse begins to increase in weight, we may opt to switch them to the local hay which has a lower caloric count. All horses are assessed on this scale when they first arrive at our facility and that is noted in their health record. Most of our horses are ridden at least twice a day, with one day off a week. For horses that increase in weight, we may opt to have one of our experienced riders add an additional exercise ride to the schedule. If a horse loses optimum weight, we adjust the feed accordingly.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     All manure is removed from the stalls daily and dumped in a compost pile. That pile is removed every three months off site. We use fly spray to minimize flies in the summer. If a horse is sick, we will keep them isolated in our hospital paddocks. Twice a year we run a fecal count test for each horse to manage internal parasites. Every new horse on the property is placed in an isolation paddock for at least 30 days.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Specific training will be performed with personnel and participants during the year. Fire: Arena/Barn Staff or Key Volunteer designates volunteer at time of fire to dial 9-1-1 Staff or Key Volunteer designates volunteer at time of fire to meet emergency personnel at the gate when they arrive and direct them to the scene of the fire All personnel/guests/clients go to gate of pasture #1 and #2 (at end of Main Street) Sweep of facilities to be performed by staff All horses in the barn are to be turned out If it is safe to do so, best efforts will be made to lead the horses into any pasture except 1, 2 or 3 If it is unsafe to handle the horses, stall doors will be opened and horses encouraged to exit the barn. The Staff person or Key Volunteer onsite at the time is responsible for making all decisions regarding horse handling and safety Horses in the arena will be untacked and then follow the same procedures above Office Evacuate premises and go to gates of pasture #1 and #2 (at end of Main Street) Present staff member dials 9-1-1 Earthquake: Arena/Barn All personnel/guests/clients go to gate of pasture #1 and #2 (at end of Main Street) Sweep of facilities to be performed by staff or Key Volunteer All horses in the barn are to be turned out. If it is safe to do so, best efforts will be made to lead the horses into any pasture except 1, 2 or 3 If it is unsafe to handle the horses, stall doors will simply be opened and horses encouraged to exit the barn The instructor or other staff person onsite at the time is responsible for making all decisions regarding horse handling and safety Horses in the arena will be untacked and then follow the same procedures above. Office Evacuate premises and go to gates of pasture #1 and #2 (at end of Main Street) Flood: Forward Stride horses to be transported to suitable predetermined locations at the first warnings of floods All classes will be cancelled until water table returns to safe levels Power Outage Power Outage. If loss of power occurs for more than 12 hours, a generator (provided by Amber Varner) activates the water pump so horses can be watered. If the generator fails, water can be brought in from outdoor troughs. The generator can also operate minimum lighting. If appropriate, horses will remain in their stalls. Clients will be notified via phone as to the impact on lessons and ride times. In the event of power outage, the premises will be checked for downed power lines. Flashlights are located: In the Viewing Room In the First Aid Closet Near each grooming area In the Grain Room Between the sliding glass door and the heater in the Igloo, Near the foot of the stairs in the Volunteer Lounge Near the door in the Hippotherapy/Program Office In the Volunteer Check-in Area

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     Security Security. Facility is locked down at night via barn doors and entrance gates. Barn closure procedures are posted in the volunteer check in area. Office closure procedures are posted next to the main office door. Every person entering the property is required to check in at the office, fill out a liability release and sign in/out. All visitors are accompanied by a staff for a guided tour.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Washington County Animal Services 1901 SE 24th Avenue Hillsboro, OR 97123-7920 (503) 846-7041

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Washington County Police Address: 3700 SW Murray Blvd, Beaverton, OR 97005 Phone: (503) 846-2700


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 05/04/2017

Veterinarian: Barb Crabb, DVM

Clinic Name: Pacific Cres Sporthorse    Street: 15056 South Spangler Rd.    City: Oregon City  State: OR    Zip: 97045

Phone: 503-632-6336    Email: bcrabbedvm@aol.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Amanda Garrison

     2. Instructor: Amber Varner

     3. Instructor: Claire Campbell

     4. Instructor: Lisa Harmman

     5. Instructor: Michelle Whitaeker

     6. Instructor: Patty Nelson


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 36.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 36

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 60

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Veterinary, dental, farrier costs are for Forward Stride owned horses only. We have some of the costs covered as donations, and/or paid by owner of the equine (as many horses are on a leased to us).

31 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 6 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

37 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

0 = Total of 2d-2f

37 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            35 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            2 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$37000     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$21194     Bedding.

$17000     Veterinarian.

$6225     Farrier.

$4200     Dentist.

$25900     Manure Removal.

$22965     Medications & Supplements.

$2733     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$1     Horse Care Staff.

$1     Horse Training.

$5000     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$142219     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

10950     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $13
Question 3 ($142,219 ) divided by Question 4 (10950).

Average length of stay for an equine: 296 days
Question 4 (10950) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (37).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Half of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? Half of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 125

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 60

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 49

4. What is the average wait list time? 1 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 3.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 4

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 90%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed. It is our policy that the equines are used no more than three hours in a day and no more than two hours at a time. There are occasionally exceptions to this rule because of equine soundness or illness or because of competitions or special events. Most horses have one day off unless they perform better when used lightly every day (for example, some equines with low grade arthritis do better without a day off).


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Amanda Garrison

         *Facility Participation:

         Forward Stride

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.), a federally-registered 501(c3) nonprofit, was formed in 1969 as the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association to promote equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) for individuals with special needs.


     2. *Instructor: Amber Varner

         *Facility Participation:

         Forward Stride

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1999

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.), a federally-registered 501(c3) nonprofit, was formed in 1969 as the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association to promote equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) for individuals with special needs.


     3. *Instructor: Claire Campbell

         *Facility Participation:

         Forward Stride

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.), a federally-registered 501(c3) nonprofit, was formed in 1969 as the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association to promote equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) for individuals with special needs.


     4. *Instructor: Lisa Harmman

         *Facility Participation:

         Forward Stride

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International and Egala

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.), a federally-registered 501(c3) nonprofit, was formed in 1969 as the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association to promote equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) for individuals with special needs.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Egala

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.he Eagala Model is a distinct experience-based, team-approach framework designed to empower clients to analyze their situations, make connections, and find their own solutions through personal and physical experiences. Over the past 17 years, our clients have reported that they have been able to change and grow more effectively and quickly than through traditional approaches.


     5. *Instructor: Michelle Whitaeker

         *Facility Participation:

         Forward Stride

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.), a federally-registered 501(c3) nonprofit, was formed in 1969 as the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association to promote equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) for individuals with special needs.


     6. *Instructor: Patty Nelson

         *Facility Participation:

         Forward Stride

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.), a federally-registered 501(c3) nonprofit, was formed in 1969 as the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association to promote equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) for individuals with special needs.