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Healing Arenas, Inc.

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 03/29/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Julie Baker

Employees:   Full-Time:  0  Part-Time:  0  Volunteers:  8

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Annual Volunteer Orientation Training (or as needed) - a 3 hour course involving safety, real-life scenarios and Risk Management. Volunteer expectations and descriptions are handed out and signed for. These scenarios are taught by state certified EMT and Fire Department personnel. Records and sign-in sheets are kept indefinitely.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  2

Number of Board Members:  5  Number of Voting Board Members:  5

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes

Additional Comments:
We comply with all State and Federal guidelines in regards to all non-profit requirements, including conflict of interest and ethical practices.


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Retired racehorse re-habilitation, re-training and adoption services. These horses are utilized for equine assisted psychotherapy and learning services for the community while in their re-training program. STABLE SURVIVORS is our Veterans Project, which is provided as a partnership between Healing Arenas and the Modesto Vet Center, a VA funded combat veteran psychotherapy office.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. Non-horse Community service with organizations such as American Legion, Escalon Lions Club.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     We follow American Association of Equine Practitioner guidelines in regards to euthanasia and horsekeeping welfare practices. All are visible on our website at http://healingarenas.org/retired-racehorse-adoption/, under our Equine Committee sub-heading.

Our re-training program is individual specific, as some horses have sustained injuries at the track, and/or longer turnout time compared to others. This may involve equine massage therapy and other methods to provide muscle and joint relief for horses with arthritic conditions. A Body Condition Score (BCS) score of 4 to 5 is preferred and is on-average is achieved within 60 days of retraining under saddle. Conditioning is again individually specific as to the beginning BCS and injury if any. Horses are usually re-started with round-pen techniques and go on to being ponied for conditioning before riding if turned out for a significant amount of time.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     We acquire horses donated directly from the track (usually with injuries), also from individuals who donate them from local ranches. The Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation donates from their farm in Oklahoma and Kansas for re-training and adoption.

We do not adopt horses to unfit situations and retain right of refusal once horse is adopted. We NEVER post pictures of neglected starving animals in order to attain donations.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     We utilize an Adoption Application and Site visit with reference checks - especially veterinarian. We have had much success with social media to attract adoptions, and now word-of-mouth as we continue to succeed.

Horses no longer useful/manageable/ill/injured are defined by trainer and one other source (usually veterinarian), who may refer us to our euthanasia policy on an individual basis. We utilize horses that are retired from riding in our therapy programs.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     We utilize a form for each horse to ID and verify tattoo from racing, weight, height, BCS. Veterinary exam (immediate if needed and xray if required). If the horse is donated from a source of unknown conditions (auction yards), it is immediately quarantined downwind and south of the main area. The main goal is an injured horse being able to be turned out with the herd for an amount of time specific to injury or recovery from racing. Most horses come with health records, and if coming from the racetrack, have all immunizations. We provide bi-annual health checks for horses still remaining in the herd.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     We use BCS as our general monitoring system. Vital signs, visual inspections. Bi-annual vet and vaccination schedules (including strangles and West Nile), de-worming x2 annually and more if equine has fecal tested so. At-risk animals are penned individually, geriatric horses supplemented and horses with serious issues are evaluated and a plan of action is taken in regards to the fitness of the animal being in our smaller 10 acre environment.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     We utilize the AAEP Standard of Euthanasia which is confirmed with our veterinarian.

Difficult horses are found homes that can give the horse space, such as the large farms in Oklahoma (1,000 acres plus per field). We find such horses relax in herd environments and usually are 'schooled' by the herd environment, providing the best case scenario for that horse. We do not adopt out difficult horses.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     We do not have a breeding policy, as all the horses donated are not pregnant. We do not have a facility for stallions, so we are not able to take them.

Mares that are adopted out may be bred if adoptive owner sees fit.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     Yes

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training? 
     Research here is not defined as equine health/behavior research. It is research for mental health for our equine assisted psychotherapy projects.

We do provide "Labs" for RVT students - annual health exam including vital signs, immunizations, blood draws and xray.

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. 
     Never

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     Yes

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     Rarely do we foster out horses, only in the case of a known home. The following is our policy:
Application
Site Visit
Quarterly photos or visit - horses are usually within 30 minute drive.
Bi-Annual vet maintenance required and documented.

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: $751 to $1,000

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine level of training.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine age.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine type.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine health and soundness.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization feels that increasing/varying fees may extend the length of stay for individual equines in our care.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: 16. We've found our average re-training re-homing is a 9 month interval, but individual on a case-by-case basis.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Dependent Ranch

31393 Combs Rd Escalon CA 95320

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Julie Baker

2. Contact's Phone: 2099887800

3. Contact's Email: healingarenas@gmail.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 2.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 10

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. 2 LARGE PASTURES WITH 5' NON-CLIMB HORSE FENCE, 2 7/8" STEEL POSTS. ONE RUN-IN SHED PER FIELD. ONE BARN 30X60 FOR HAY STORAGE, TACK ROOM AND 2 EACH 14X24 STALLS WITH RUNS.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     ROTATION - EVERY 4 MONTHS

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 10

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     PANELED SAND ARENA, 80X120. ONE 60' ROUND PEN, PANELS. SAND NECESSARY IN THE CENTRAL VALLEY DUE TO OUTSIDE WET CONDITIONS. MUST IRRIGATE BY SPRINKLER ONCE A WEEK IN SUMMER TO KEEP SAND PACKED.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     TRAILERS AVAILABLE 24X7

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? No

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     NO TACK NECESSARY OTHER THAN HALTERS FOR EQUINE ASSISTED PSYCHOTHERAPY ACTIVITIES. RETIRED RACEHORSE RE-TRAINING UTILIZES RANCH TACK, WESTERN OR ENGLISH. MUST BE SAFE AND IN WORKING CONDITION - SADDLES ARE FIT ACCORDING TO WIDTH. BITS ARE USUALLY MINIMAL, RE-STARTING ALL EX-RACERS HORSES WITH RUBBER D BIT.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     MARKINGS, GENDER AND SIZE. BINDER IN TACK ROOM WITH PICTURES

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     NO STALL BOUND HORSES AT FACILITY

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     HORSES ASSESSED FOR FEED USING HENNEKE BCS, SUPPLEMENTS MINIMAL DUE TO NUTRITION IN 24X7 GRAZING. MINERAL AND REGULAR SALT BLOCKS AVAILABLE 24X7.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     ASSESS EACH HORSE EVERY TWO WEEKS. CHANGES ARE NOTED IN HORSE BINDER IN TACK ROOM, ADJUSTMENTS MADE INDIVIDUALLY.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     BIOSECURITY = QUARANTINE FOR 2 WEEKS, ANY INCOMING EQUINES DOWNWIND AND SOUTH OF BARN IN OWN PEN, SEPARATED FROM FIELDS IN BACK. MANURE IS PILED AT VERY NORTHERN END OF FIELD, REMOVED X2 ANNUALLY. CARCASSES ARE REMOVED BY PRIVATE CONTRACTOR, BUT HORSES USUALLY PUT DOWN AT PIONEER EQUINE HOSPITAL IF NEEDED. PARASITES CONTROLLED BY FLY MASKS, FLY SPRAY, DE-WORMING WITH FECAL TESTING. PREDATOR FLY CONTROL SPREAD IN SPRING.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     FLOODING IS A CONCERN IN CENTRAL VALLEY AREA. TRAILERS ARE ALWAYS ACCESSIBLE TO REMOVE HORSES TO RODEO GROUNDS IF NECESSARY. FIRE PREVENTION IS PRACTICED WITH LOCAL FD. BELOW IS OUR RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN. A foundation has been established for providing structured program information. The following program elements are and defined as below: • Define work scope, schedule, resources, and costs o Define scope of Program o Create Safety Committee o Develop a Schedule o Estimate costs and implement annual budget o Identify required and available resources • Define Risk Management Roles and Responsibilities o Quarterly risk assessment meetings during regular Board meetings, and attended by the Safety Committee o Creating Safety Manual o Document applied concepts defined in Safety Manual o Manage all loss control functions such as complete all Incident forms and submit to proper authority The top high probability and high impact risk to the program has been identified: Liability Risk for Injury Definition: Injury while working with horses. The risk of physical injury is present while working with any animals. The Plan includes implementing a Safety Committee, who will be responsible for the following tasks; establishing a Safety Manual, which provides for the following; naming the Safety Manager, preparing a schedule which identifies risks, reviewing schedules quarterly, a plan for Emergency Preparedness, Facility Inspection, Documentation, Horse Inspection, Incident Reporting and forms, Incident Follow-up and general EAGALA safety training for those who are participating in sessions. The Safety Committee will act as loss control (see Loss Control Program) and provide accountability to the insurance company and other authority. HTH will further reduce this risk by providing education and safety procedures to horse handlers, volunteers, and all other participants including the public, and will supervise all horse related activities (see Safety Management Program). RISK MANAGEMENT APPROACH The Safety Committee will act as risk management, and reports directly to HTH Board of Directors. Risks have been identified and documented on the Schedule. Risks are placed on the Schedule in order of priority, which are identified as risks which are more likely to occur, and have a significant impact on the program, will be the highest priority risks while those which are more unlikely or have a low impact will be a much lower priority. Risks will be monitored and mitigated according to the guidelines of this Plan and reassessed on a quarterly basis. RISK IDENTIFICATION Risk identification was conducted by the Safety Committee. Risks will be identified on the Schedule. The Safety Committee will research historical information from other similar programs and report back to the Board by the end of 2010, in order to assess properly identified risks and potential additions to the Schedule. Current Risks Identified are below: Liability for injury and/or death for both people and horses, Property Damage, Lawsuits, Private property loss, Unsigned liability forms, Uncompleted safety training of staff/volunteers, physical injury due to unsafe conditions, lack of funding for sessions, lack of mental health practitioners RISK QUALIFICATION AND PRIORITIZATION Identified risks are scored, and placed on the Schedule according to priority, probability and impact. RISK MONITORING Risks will be assessed during each quarter. Risks with higher priority may be monitored and assess on a monthly basis. The assessment of risks will be a continuous process throughout the life of the Program, as well as thorough documentation. The Safety Committee (or risk management team) will be responsible for the addition of any potential risks, report to the Board, and add to the Schedule as needed. RISK MITIGATION AND AVOIDANCE The Safety Committee will develop mitigation and avoidance responses to each risk, and will be monitored according to the risk management policy. All risks will be managed and controlled within the constraints of time, scope, and cost. All identified risks will be evaluated in order to determine how they are affected by this triple constraint. The Safety Committee will determine the best way to respond to each risk to ensure compliance with these constraints, and within the policy of this Risk Management Plan. RISK SCHEDULE The Risk Schedule is a log of all identified risks, their probability and impact to the project, mitigation strategy, and when the risk may occur. The Schedule will be created through the initial project risk management meeting led by the project manager. During this meeting, the project team will be identify and categorize each risk. Additionally, the team will assign each risk a score based on the probability of it occurring and the impact it could potentially have. The Risk Schedule also contains the mitigation strategy for each risk, and when the risk may occur. The Risk Schedule will be maintained as Appendix “A” to this Risk Management Plan. SAFETY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM A Safety Committee will be established who will retain oversight over the safety protocols set forth. Members of the Safety Committee will responsible for loss control measures and accountability. The Committee will consist of four members. Members are named and assigned duties which will be recorded in the Safety Manual and the Project Plan. The Safety Committee will manage the Safety program. The procedures of Safety Management for both HTH and DR programs, any horse related activities sponsored by or attended by HTH or DR will be as follows:  Establishment of the Safety Manual, which will include: o General Safety Protocols (first aid kits, emergency procedures, liability forms, etc) o General Facility Protocols (facility control measures such as fencing, dogs or other animals, hazards, including Hazard Identification forms for documentation, trip/fall hazards, parking, location well marked for emergencies, emergency vehicle access, waiting area to provide for client confidentiality, posting per California guidelines) o Equine Safety Practices (health inspection and temperament assessment protocol, acclimation to surroundings before sessions, and management protocols during and after sessions, observation documentation) o Organizational Meeting prior to sessions (discuss horses being used, activities, considerations of different groupings, awareness of horse reactions, and opportunity to fill out and review equine release of liability forms) o Promote safety around horses using an awareness approach, which reinforces a mind set of attentiveness o Experiential learning atmosphere (address safety and risk concerns through the experiential learning model as taught in the EAGALA certification program  Establish an Emergency Preparedness Protocol (to be included in the Safety manual) o Client emergency forms o Phone numbers for emergency services (police/fire/ems) o Confirm cell phone service availability at site o Confirm land line phone service at site o Confirm location/address/directions to direct emergency services o Verify access for emergency services o Confirm emergency first aid kit location o Confirm exits are unlocked and operational o In the event of an incident, secure and remove horses from scene o Isolate injured party and remain calm while calling emergency services or have non-injured party call emergency services o Do not move injured party o After injured party is cared for, obtain written witness’ statements, including name, address, phone o Schedule post-incident debrief with present parties and Safety committee  Define Incident and establish Incident Management Protocol (see Loss Control Program)  Establish staff and volunteer training Protocol (to be included in the Safety manual) The Safety Manual will include all safety and loss control forms. A copy of the Safety Manual will be present at each location utilized by Hope Through Horses and/or Dependent Ranch.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     ON PREMIS OWNER, GATE ONLY ABLE TO BE OPENED WITH OPENER (NO KEYPAD), NO PUBLIC AFTER HOURS. CAMERAS IN PLACE.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL 2010 EAST EARHART RD, #100 STOCKTON CA 95240 209-953-6070

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     GOLDEN GATE FIELDS THOROUGHBRED AFTERCARE ALLIANCE 1100 EASTSHORE HWY BERKELEY CA 94710 510-559-7300 CALIFORNIA THOROUGHBRED BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 201 COLORADO PL ARCADIA CA 91007 626-445-7800 THOROUGHBRED OWNERS OF CALIFORNIA 285 WEST HUNTINGTON DR ARCADIA CA 91007 626-574-6620


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 02/23/2017

Veterinarian: DR JODY HALLSTROM

Clinic Name: PIONEER EQUINE HOSPITAL    Street: 11536 CLEVELAND AVE    City: OAKDALE  State: CA    Zip: 95361

Phone: 209-847-5951    Email: INFO@PIONEEREQUINE.COM


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Dan Prine, PsyD

     2. Instructor: Julie Baker


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 12.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 13

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 15

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Our horses are lucky enough to be on 10 acres of pasture full time - requiring feeding hay only 4 months during winter. We've also established a relationship with a local college RVT program, who brings registered vet tech students out to do bi-annual exams, vaccinations and de-worming. The costs of these supplies are paid for by the college in exchange for providing the students a hands-on equine wet lab for their degree. Training expenses for each horse adopted out is per individual horse and is usually at $500 per horse.

10 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 6 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

16 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 4 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 1 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

5 = Total of 2d-2f

11 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            9 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            2 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$2142     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$259     Bedding.

$1083     Veterinarian.

$1330     Farrier.

$378     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$349     Medications & Supplements.

$451     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$1000     Horse Training.

$451     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$7443     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

4380     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $2
Question 3 ($7,443 ) divided by Question 4 (4380).

Average length of stay for an equine: 274 days
Question 4 (4380) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (16).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? Most of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? 2-3 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 15-

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 25

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 36

4. What is the average wait list time? 0 Weeks(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 10.00  Un-Mounted: 4.00  Total: 14

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 1

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 50%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Dan Prine, PsyD

         *Facility Participation:

         Dependent Ranch

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.EAGALA

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2008

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine assisted psychotherapy and learning experiences

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.CA Board of Psychologists

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1996

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Doctor of Psychology, Psy.D.

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Highly qualified psychologist performing the mental health facilitation of the team


     2. *Instructor: Julie Baker

         *Facility Participation:

         Dependent Ranch

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.EAGALA

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2007

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Assisted Psychotherapy services - equine professional

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.EMT

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2006

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Emergency Medical Technician

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.California Horse Racing Board

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1986

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Licensed Assistant Trainer for California thoroughbred horse racing