×
LEARN MORE ABOUT US HERE
Our Work About Us Grants How to Apply Recipients Photo Credits
Equine Welfare Network Sign Up Here Equine Charity Network Alliance Guardians Champions Equine Education Network

Awards Equine Award Horse Stars Hall of Fame Humanitarian Award Klinger Award Research Fellowship
Get Involved Make a Donation #RideForHorses Join Here Winners Circle Best Performance Who's In! Attend an Event Establish a Horse Whisperers Fund

EQUUStars Partners News Contact Us Login Individual Organization

America's Horses
Need Our Protection!



Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/27/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Alexis Weaver

Employees:   Full-Time:  4  Part-Time:  6  Volunteers:  120

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Hearts maintains employee and volunteer handbooks that outline our policies, job descriptions, and safety procedures. We also have a PATH Manual available for review to all employees and volunteers that codifies our safety procedures and standards, as Hearts is a PATH Certified Premier Facility.
Hearts has a four-part training session in which employees are required to attend all four sessions, and volunteers are required to attend at least parts one and two:
1) Orientation: Includes an overview by our Volunteer Coordinator of what therapeutic riding is and how it is beneficial to our community. A video is shown of how therapeutic riding works, and the role(s) of the Volunteers. Volunteers are provided with an application, liability release form, and commitment request.
2) Sidewalking/Horsemanship: Taught by an Instructor and/or Volunteer Team Captain (an individual who is selected by the Volunteer Coordinator and has accrued a minimum of 32 hours per month of volunteer hours), this demonstrates how to effectively communicate with riders and support them while they are on horse-back.
3) Grooming/Tacking: Taught by a Volunteer Team Captain, this session provides information on adaptive tack, and how to properly groom and tack for both English and Western riders.
4) Leading: Taught by an Instructor, this advanced session is Pass/Fail and works with Volunteers and Employees to learn how to lead a therapy horse through walk/trot gaits in a lesson.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  4

Number of Board Members:  6  Number of Voting Board Members:  5

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Hearts offers a series of horse-related programs, including:
1) Therapeutic Riding: Riders with physical, cognitive and emotional disabilities are provided with volunteer support and an appropriate horse to learn how to ride.
2) Veterans Program: To honor and support our Veterans, Hearts has allocated a whole day in which Veterans can groom, tack, trail-ride, take a lesson, or simply hang out with our horses. This program was designed to provide Veterans with an opportunity to be part of a cohesive unit, where they can be of service to each other, and decompress from the stress of daily life.
3) Horsemanship Skills: Primarily employing ground-work, this program is designed to help individuals gain comfort around horses, and teach basic skills such as grooming and leading.
4) Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy (EFP): In partnership with REINS of Hope in Ojai, CA, Hearts is pleased to offer EAP in support of individuals, families or Veterans in need of experiential counseling.
5) Equine Facilitated Learning (EFL): These ground-work sessions empower individuals (children and adults) by using horses to teach effective communication and coping strategies. As horses are natural barometers to human emotion, with the assistance of an EAGALA certified, licensed marriage family therapist and PATH certified equine specialist, we are able to provide experiential learning opportunities to participants.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. Hearts adopted a lone sheep in December, 2016, which is used in some of our EFL work.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  Yes



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Our organization believes that the physical well-being of our horses is equally important as the emotional well being of our horses. We adhere to the philosophy that emotionally sound and physically capable horses are more likely to willingly perform their job effectively. It is because of this belief that we practice regular schooling of our horses in which we focus on three specific segments: physical training, emotional training and behavioral training. During the first segment we lightly exercise our horses according to their former discipline as an emotional reprieve from therapeutic riding lessons in addition to maintaining their strength and endurance. In the second segment of our schooling we take our horses on a trail ride using hills to strengthen their topline and haunches to more effectively support our therapeutic riders. We then work on correcting behavioral issues that have been documented throughout the previous week through simulating therapeutic lesson situations in which we gently correct inappropriate behavior and overtly praise our horses for performing correctly, to reinforce positive behavior. This last segment is important, as these corrections and praises are not appropriate during therapeutic lessons.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Horses are acquired by either horse owners contacting Hearts for donation, lease, or sale, or Hearts directly researches horses within 100 miles that meet those criteria.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Hearts has seven criteria that are used to determine if a horse should remain in the Hearts Program:
1. Must be physically and emotionally capable of working 10 hours per week.
2. Must be capable of the duties required of a program horse, as determined by the Program Director.
3. Must be gentle and quiet with an easy-going temperament.
4. Must have a low flight response.
5. Must have appropriate ground manners during leading, grooming, standing, mounting, and dismounting.
6. Must not be on continuous daily medication for pain related ailments.
7. Must be sound and able to present an even gait at the walk, trot and canter.
In the event any of the seven criteria are not met and after agreement between the Director, Barn Manager and Primary Care Veterinarian it is determined the horse due to his or her present quality of life, either physical or mental, is no longer suitable for the program the horse is put up for adoption. Due to the small nature of our horse community and the ease of notifying others of the availability of our horses, generally word of mouth has been successful in placing the horse in a qualified stable or formal retirement facility assuming the horse is healthy enough for any of those environments.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Our staff completes a pre-screening checklist, assessing the following criteria to determine if the horse is an appropriate candidate for the Hearts program:
o Sound in walk, trot and canter
o Between 7 and 16 years of age
o Between 14 and 15.3 hands
o Low flight response
o Good ground manners
o Previous training in English or Western
o Willingness to learn and accept new situations
o Training in either English or Western
o Low maintenance with regards to additives to feed and care
o Previous experience may include hunter, jumper, trail horse, pony club, 4 H, reining, cutting, dressage, 3 day eventing etc.
If the horse meets the above criteria, our Program Director and Equine Manager visit the horse and complete a new screening form assessing the horses flight response and ability to handle beginning, unbalanced riders, through simulated therapeutic situations and a test ride. We then review the horses vet records and if appropriate, bring the horse on-site for a 90 day trial. During the first two weeks the horse is held in quarantine to observe herd behaviors and health.
The 90-day trial period objective is to expose the horse to all potential components of a therapeutic riding program. During this time the horse will be exposed to simulated riders and situations of a therapeutic riding program, desensitized as needed, and trained to accept the commonly experienced facets of a therapeutic riding program. As the horse progresses through the training period, the Program Director will assess whether it is safe and/or necessary to expose the horse to riders within the therapeutic riding program.
Each component begins with simulated experiences with the objective of progressing towards actual therapeutic riding situations.
• Grooming
• Tacking
• Hearts Therapeutic Leading method
• Side walking
• Therapeutic mounts and dismounts at the mounting block and ramp
• Exposure to toys and props used in program (including sight, sound and touch)
• Exposure to behaviors of riders with disabilities through a simulated experience
• Exposure to riders with various ability levels
If the horse passes the above criteria, we do a vet check and accept the horse into our program.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Our horses are managed by experienced horse professionals. The herd is wormed twice a year and vaccinated per protocol recommended by our veterinarians. We have two primary first response veterinarians in case of emergency and two specialists if needed for a second opinion or referral. Our horses' weights and overall condition are reviewed and discussed often. If changes in hay, pellets or supplements are needed, the changes are made quickly. Our older horses are on joint supplements and senior supplements. As each new hay shipment arrives the hay is inspected and the amount fed changes based on hay quality and flake weight. Horses are fed a diet that is based on weight, age and use, as well as individual requirements. Regarding foot care: both farriers are on a timely schedule. Their recommendations are first discussed by the Program Director and Barn Manager, and normally followed.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Hearts maintains a specific set of criteria regarding quality of life for our program horses:
1. The horse must not be in pain that cannot be managed.
2. The horse must be willfully eating the required dietary amounts necessary to maintain health.
3. The horse must have the ability to perform normal bodily functions without assistance.
4. The horse must be able to get up and lie down without assistance.
5. The horse must not be chronically lame and experiencing discomfort.
6. The horse must not be functionally lame, resulting in its inability to participate as a normal herd animal.
7. The horse must not remain in a known condition of chronic illness that cannot be managed, which will eventually cause an acute condition of suffering.
If any of the above conditions for Quality of Life fail to exist and, with the advice of the consulting veterinarian, the horse is judged to have a compromised quality of life, then the horse will be humanely euthanized, unless the Donor requests otherwise. The intention of this action would be to respect the horse’s quality of life, and to prevent any suffering the horse may experience if they were to remain alive.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     Hearts maintains a no breeding policy, and therefore does not accept stallions under any circumstances. We currently do not have a no-breeding clause in our documentation, however in the event that we receive a horse with a foal in utero, we would return the horse as it would not meet the criteria for remaining a working horse at Hearts during and immediately after birth.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center

PO Box 30662 Santa Barbara CA 93130

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Alexis Weaver

2. Contact's Phone: 805-964-1519

3. Contact's Email: alexis@heartsriding.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: County of Santa Barbara
1105 Santa Barbara Street
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
805-560-1079

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     We have a lease with the County of Santa Barbara for the parcel on which our facility exists. Our current agreement is for twenty years, beginning October 1, 2013 and ending October 1, 2033, with the option for two additional terms of five years each.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     The owner (County of Santa Barbara) owns the land only, and provides no services.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 5.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 13

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. We do not have pastures. There are two fenced turnout areas, twelve paddocks, one acclimation pen, and one isolation pen.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Mares and geldings that are compatible are turned out together some part of every day, and when appropriate all day. We have two turnout areas that easily accommodate the 15 horses we have on the ranch.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 6

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     We have a large arena with yellow sand for footing. The arena drains well and is usually fine for work 24 to 36 hours after a significant rainfall. The arena surface is dragged at least once a week, and more often if needed.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? No

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant.
     We are not a rescue or retirement facility. However, we are in compliance with those portions of the Guidelines that apply to our therapeutic riding program. For example, we have no stallions, pregnant mares or geriatric horses. All our horses are serviceably sound and used in the program.

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Yes, Hearts is recognized as a PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship) Premier Accredited Center (PAC). The PATH accreditation process is a peer review system in which trained volunteers visit and review centers in accordance with PATH Intl. standards. A center that meets the accreditation requirements based on the administrative, facility, program and applicable special interest standards becomes a PATH Intl. Premier Accredited Center for a period of five years. Hearts is accredited through September 2021.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Santa Barbara Equine Evacuation is housed at our facility. We have numerous trailers on site and qualified truck drivers to evacuate the herd in as little as two hours should the need arise. If a medical emergency occurs we have the trailers on premises and qualified truck drivers within 20 minutes of the facility. A list of emergency volunteer drivers and handlers is printed and displayed in our office.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     We have three professional horsemen and horsewomen that address all tack purchase, fit and suitability for each specific horses in both English and Western tack, including head gear and padding. Horses are reviewed quarterly (or sooner, if needed) to ensure tack still fits appropriately.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Each paddock has a placard on it that lists the horse's name that lives there. Additionally, every halter and bridle has a name-tag. We also have a metal placard for use in the cross-ties, so horses can be moved around, and the placards switched accordingly. We also have a map at the cross-ties that shows where each paddock and horse is.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     All our horses are used in the program. In the event of an injury that requires stall rest, we have staff hand walk as appropriate or to monitor limited turnout if that is the veterinarian's directive.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Horses are fed a diet that is based on weight, age and use, as well as individual requirements. Our horse's weights and overall condition are reviewed and discussed often. If changes in hay, pellets or supplements are needed, the changes are made quickly. Our older horses are on joint supplements and senior supplements. As each new hay shipment arrives the hay is inspected and the amount fed changes based on hay quality and flake weight.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     We do not use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     We have a manure storage area that is approximately 200 feet from the paddock area. We are fortunate to have many small growers and homeowners in Santa Barbara that take our manure for their farming use. In addition the Santa Barbara Botanical Garden takes a large portion for their use. We do not spray the manure with any fly or parasite preventatives. This is at the request of our users who make cash donations each time they pick up manure. At this point we have no fly or parasite problems that are related to our manure storage. In the last eight years we have had only one horse die on the premises. Within 24 hours the carcass was removed by the professional who does that in our area. Our veterinarians have had no direct role in the development of our plan. They are aware however of how we run the ranch and their suggestions are welcome and often incorporated.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Our primary concern is fire. We have in place an evacuation plan with numerous trailers on site and qualified truck drivers to evacuate the herd in as little as two hours should the need arise.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     We are not easily seen from any major road or highway, and have a locked gate at the entrance to our facility. The gate is locked after the evening feeding, and re-opened after the morning feeding. We are closed most Sundays and the gate remains locked all day. We do not have a security system.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Santa Barbara Humane Society 5399 Overpass Road Santa Barbara, CA 93111 Attn: Tim Collins 805-964-4777 ext. 18

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     None.


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/22/2017

Veterinarian: Ingrid Wolff

Clinic Name: Armitas Equine Veterinary Service    Street: PO Box 1101.    City: Santa Ynez  State: CA    Zip: 93460

Phone: 805-452-9468    Email: info@armitasequine.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Connie Weinsoff

     2. Instructor: Darcie Simson

     3. Instructor: Devon Sachey

     4. Instructor: Shallon Dusebout

     5. Instructor: Susan Weber


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 16.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 16

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 18

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

13 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 13 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 9 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

35 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 18 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 1 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 1 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

20 = Total of 2d-2f

15 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            11 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            4 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$25524     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$5956     Veterinarian.

$9200     Farrier.

$1808     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$5447     Medications & Supplements.

$2180     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$34519     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$12966     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$97600     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

5744     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $17
Question 3 ($97,600 ) divided by Question 4 (5744).

Average length of stay for an equine: 164 days
Question 4 (5744) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (35).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? Most of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 93

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 48

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 47

4. What is the average wait list time? 8 Weeks(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 2.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 3

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 4

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 87%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Connie Weinsoff

         *Facility Participation:

         Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1994

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.A PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructor is able to conduct a safe, basic equestrian lesson to individuals with special needs. To achieve this certification, applicants must: 1. Apply for PATH Intl. membership. 2. Submit PATH Intl. instructor certification application to the PATH Intl. office. 3. Complete two online courses and exams. 4. Complete a Horsemanship Skills Checklist. 5. Obtain current CPR and First Aid certification (online not accepted). 6. Complete 25 hours teaching group lessons (two or more riders) with disabilities under the guidance or direct supervision of a PATH Intl. Certified Instructor 7. Attend and successfully complete an On-Site Workshop which includes two-and-a-half days of both classroom and hands-on learning. 8. Attend and successfully complete an On-Site Certification in which candidates can complete their certification by demonstrating their riding ability and instruction to a class of at least two students with disabilities.


     2. *Instructor: Darcie Simson

         *Facility Participation:

         Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2007

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.A PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructor is able to conduct a safe, basic equestrian lesson to individuals with special needs. To achieve this certification, applicants must: 1. Apply for PATH Intl. membership. 2. Submit PATH Intl. instructor certification application to the PATH Intl. office. 3. Complete two online courses and exams. 4. Complete a Horsemanship Skills Checklist. 5. Obtain current CPR and First Aid certification (online not accepted). 6. Complete 25 hours teaching group lessons (two or more riders) with disabilities under the guidance or direct supervision of a PATH Intl. Certified Instructor 7. Attend and successfully complete an On-Site Workshop which includes two-and-a-half days of both classroom and hands-on learning. 8. Attend and successfully complete an On-Site Certification in which candidates can complete their certification by demonstrating their riding ability and instruction to a class of at least two students with disabilities.


     3. *Instructor: Devon Sachey

         *Facility Participation:

         Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2013

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.A PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructor is able to conduct a safe, basic equestrian lesson to individuals with special needs. To achieve this certification, applicants must: 1. Apply for PATH Intl. membership. 2. Submit PATH Intl. instructor certification application to the PATH Intl. office. 3. Complete two online courses and exams. 4. Complete a Horsemanship Skills Checklist. 5. Obtain current CPR and First Aid certification (online not accepted). 6. Complete 25 hours teaching group lessons (two or more riders) with disabilities under the guidance or direct supervision of a PATH Intl. Certified Instructor 7. Attend and successfully complete an On-Site Workshop which includes two-and-a-half days of both classroom and hands-on learning. 8. Attend and successfully complete an On-Site Certification in which candidates can complete their certification by demonstrating their riding ability and instruction to a class of at least two students with disabilities.


     4. *Instructor: Shallon Dusebout

         *Facility Participation:

         Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Certified as a Therapeutic Riding Instructor.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Certified as an Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning to support Equine Facilitated Learning and Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy programs.


     5. *Instructor: Susan Weber

         *Facility Participation:

         Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2003

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Susan was certified at High Hopes Therapeutic Riding in Old Lyme, Connecticut to teach therapeutic riding and equine care.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Certified as an Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning to support Equine Facilitated Learning and Psychotherapy classes.

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Certified as a Mentor Instructor to train future therapeutic riding instructors to be as safe and effective as possible.