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Safe Haven Equine Rescue & Retirement Home, Inc.

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 01/28/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Richard Fincher

Employees:   Full-Time:    Part-Time:    Volunteers:  12

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Volunteers are trained one on one by working with the Executive Director or a trained senior care volunteer.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  10

Number of Board Members:  7  Number of Voting Board Members:  7

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member. Richard Fincher - Executive Director
Debbie Fincher - Board Secretary

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member, and the name of the related organization. The Executive Director and the Board secretary own the facility that is leased by the organization.

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Safe Haven Equine Rescue and Retirement Home, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to the welfare of horses. Our goal is to rescue abused, distressed, or neglected horses, bring these rescued horses back to optimal health and to find them loving homes. In some cases, due to age or disability, a horse will not be able to be adopted. For these horses Safe Haven Equine Rescue and Retirement Home, Inc. will provide a home where they can peacefully live out the rest of their life with dignity.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. We have no non-horse programs.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     The horses that come to Safe Haven are starved and or abused. We slowly reintroduce them to feed, good grass, and quality hay as to prevent colic. We handle every horse everyday to rebuild their trust in humans. We work on ground manners and some round pen lounging. We do not ride at Safe Haven. Once the horse is healthy we start trying to find a forever home for them.

We take any horses in any condition that is listed on the seizure warrant. Where we take the horse and how what treatments we give is based on findings from the vet once it has been seen. We have enough space to handle 25 horses at the barn. We also have several people willing and approved to be foster homes if needed.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Seizure

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Any horse at Safe Haven that can not be adopted for any reason will be provided a place in the Sanctuary. This may be here at the barn or at a permanent foster home. We work with other rescues to move horses to them that are in need of more training that we can give.

Horses housed at Safe Haven leave in one of the following ways: they’re adopted, returned to owner by court order, euthanized, or transferred to another rescue.

Adoption:
Safe Haven Equine Rescue and Retirement Home, Inc. makes a promise to all their horses that they will never have to endure abuse or neglect again. To keep that promise, there are guidelines for all adoptions.
There is an application that must be filled out and submitted. The fee for adopting is $300 per horse. All approvals will be based on the adopter’s ability to provide a safe and secure home for the horse. After the application is reviewed by the Board of Safe Haven Equine Rescue and Retirement Home, Inc., a volunteer will contact the adopter to set up a time to see the facilities.
There must be:
• Clean water containers in addition to any ponds
• Pastures that are free of trash and large enough to support the number of horses kept there
• Shelter
• Sturdy fencing

Once approved, the Adopter will be required to sign an Adoption Agreement. The original will be kept by Safe Haven Equine Rescue and Retirement Home, Inc.

By adopting a horse from Safe Haven Equine Rescue and Retirement Home, Inc. the adopter is agreeing to provide a home for that horse for life. The adopter CANNOT sell, give away, lease, or otherwise dispose of the horse. If the adopter can no longer care for the horse, he/she must be returned to Safe Haven Equine Rescue and Retirement Home, Inc.

Fostering:
Safe Haven wants every horse to have a chance for a long and happy life. Because of our limited resources, we are not able to care for every unwanted horse. Foster care allows some of the healthier unwanted horses to get a second chance.
Volunteer Fostering Guidelines:
- There shall be a volunteer foster home application in the volunteer's file
- All potential foster homes will be inspected before the volunteer foster home application can be approved
- The volunteer foster home will be responsible for all general care expenses of the horse they are fostering such as water, feed, hay, shelter and grooming
- The volunteer foster home will allow Safe Haven to come and see the horse and property with or without notice.
- The volunteer foster home must understand that the horse is still considered the property of Safe Haven
- The volunteer foster home must understand that ongoing decisions about care will remain in the hands of Safe Haven
- The volunteer foster home must understand that Safe Haven makes all medical/surgical decisions about the horse in foster care. Safe Haven provides a contact for medical emergencies. Volunteers will not be reimbursed if they take the horse to another vet for exam, testing, or treatment, etc.
- Any horse entering a foster home shall have a foster form placed in his/her file.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     All horses go straight to the vet's once we have picked them up. There they get all their vaccines, a coggins test, physical examination, and a medical chart is started on them. The vet also scores their body condition.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Feeding
Safe Haven feeds horses based on the individual needs of each horse. The current feeding instructions can be found on the white board in the feed room. Each horse will be fed in his/her stall (morning and night) so that their grain intake may be monitored. Hay will be given at night in the stall and freely in the paddocks during the day.

Water
An average horse consumes 5 to 10 gallons of water. This amount will vary based on climate conditions and feed types. The actual size of the water receptacle should be sized to accommodate the horses that it serves. Troughs should be used for all paddocks and hanging buckets for all stalls. The minimum cleaning cycle during the summer months of all water containers is once per week. During the colder months where ice is accumulating, the period can be extended for favorable weather conditions. A 10% bleach solution should be used on any trough that can be thoroughly rinsed. A stiff bristled brush should be used to completely remove any algae, dirt or other pollutants. The rule of thumb for trough cleaning is simple: "If you would not drink from it, then don't expect the horses to drink from it." During the freezing portions of winter, ice must be removed from the water troughs every morning. Breaking the ice is not sufficient as the ice will continue to chill the water and allow for a quicker freeze. By completely removing the ice, the sun can warm the water to a more suitable temperature during the day.

Worming
Horses will be wormed upon arrival and then placed on a six month worming schedule. All wormers are given based on weight. A weight tape will be used to determine their weight. For horses with a heavy parasite load contact the veterinarian prior to the commencement of treatment. For very sick horses, the starting dose should be set at 500 pounds. After two weeks, a full dose can be given. A note shall be placed in the horse’s file stating the date, amount and type of wormer used.


Vaccines
Vaccines are administered by a vet when a horse arrives at Safe Haven. Records of the type of vaccine, date, and amount shall be kept in the horse’s file. Safe Haven vaccinates for the following:
• Tetanus Toxoid with an annual booster (Pregnant mares will receive a booster 6 weeks before foaling if possible)
• Rabies with an annual booster
• EE/WEE with a booster in early March and again in September unless the 1st dose was less than 6 months prior to the booster date
• West Nile with a booster 6 months after the 1st dose and annually after that
• Influenza with an annual booster
• Rhino Pneumonitis with an annual booster except for a pregnant mare

Coggins Test
A coggins test is performed on every horse that arrives at Safe Haven. The coggins test is repeated annually. A copy of the negative coggins will be kept in the horse’s file.

Teeth
A horse's teeth can acquire sharp edges from years of grinding their food. These edges can cut the inside of the mouth making it difficult for a horse to chew properly. A warning sign is wet clumps of undigested hay lying in the feeding area. A procedure known as "floating" grinds the sharp edge down and creates a more even bite. The procedure is usually done under a light sedation and the horse must be immobilized.
Any horse over the age of 10 should be checked annually for teeth problems. Aside from sharp edges, another major problem is lost teeth. Old age, poor food quality, and fighting are the most common causes of tooth loss. Without the upper and lower teeth working together, a horse cannot chew food properly. Weight loss is a sign of chronic teeth problems. All senior horses 20+ should have their teeth checked annually. All dental work must be recorded and kept in the horse’s file.

Hoof Care
Upon arrival, a horse's hooves should be evaluated. Many horses come to Safe Haven with overgrown hooves. The most severe cases must be handled by a qualified farrier and should not be attempted by volunteer. Permanent damage can be done. The growth of a horse's hooves is effected by many things. Quality of feed, air temperature, overall health and the amount of pen space all can speed up or slow down the hoof growth. Because of this, it is impossible to create a policy based on a timed interval. Each Horse herd/group should be checked regularly for hoof growth. All farrier work will be noted in the horse’s file.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     It is the goal of the Safe Haven Equine Rescue and Retirement Home, Inc. to provide the utmost care to all horses we take in. We have made a commitment to long term care to every horse that we rescue. A reality of this commitment is that some horses are suffering and there is no more that can be done for them. Euthanasia is an important part of animal rescue, but it is a part that cannot be taken lightly. As a non-profit, we must use the funds entrusted to us in the best way possible. This means that we cannot spend thousands of dollars on one horse's life when that money could be used to save many, many more. Safe Haven Equine Rescue and Retirement Home, Inc. shall follow the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) guidelines for euthanasia:
The AAEP has developed euthanasia guidelines to help the veterinarian assist us during this very difficult time. The AAEP's standards apply to all horses, regardless of their monetary value, and are designed to avoid or terminate incurable and excessive suffering. The following are guidelines to assist in making humane decisions regarding euthanasia of horses:
• Incurable, progressive disease
• Incurable, transmissible disease
• Chronic severe lameness
• Inoperable colic
• Foals born with serious defects
• Debilitation in old age
• Severe traumatic injury
• Dangerous behavioral traits displayed towards humans or other animals
• Undue financial burden of caring for a sick or incapacitated horse
• Undue suffering for any reason
• A horse should not have to endure continuous or unmanageable pain from a condition that is chronic and incurable.
• A horse should not have to endure a medical or surgical condition that has a hopeless chance of survival.
• A horse should not have to remain alive if it has an unmanageable medical condition that renders it a hazard to itself or its handlers.
• A horse should not have to receive continuous analgesic medication for the relief of pain for the rest of its life.
• A horse should not have to endure a lifetime of continuous individual box stall confinement for prevention or relief of unmanageable pain or suffering.
If it is deemed the only option left then Safe Haven Equine Rescue and Retirement Home, Inc. will have a vet humanly euthanize a horse and dispose of him/her with respect. Safe Haven Equine Rescue and Retirement Home, Inc. DOES NOT euthanize healthy horses just to make space for new ones.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     Safe Haven does not condone or endorse breeding. There is a no breeding clause in the adoption agreement.

We have the facilities to care for a mare that comes in pregnant. They will be together in a brood stall until the foal reaches 3 months. At that point we will placed them in separate stalls at night but they remain together during the day in the field. Mare/Foal must be adopted together until the foal reaches 6 months. At that point the can to adopted separately. At 6 months we place the mare in a foster home till she is dried up.

All stallions go to a special foster home that is set up to handle them. They are gelded once the vet says they are healthy enough to be and the weather is cool enough. Foals are gelded as soon as possible after they have dropped. Newly gelded horses are also kept in foster care for 60 days before being brought to the barn.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     Yes

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     Fostering:
Safe Haven wants every horse to have a chance for a long and happy life. Because of our limited resources, we are not able to care for every unwanted horse. Foster care allows some of the healthier unwanted horses to get a second chance.
Volunteer Fostering Guidelines:
- There shall be a volunteer foster home application in the volunteer's file
- All potential foster homes will be inspected before the volunteer foster home application can be approved
- The volunteer foster home will be responsible for all general care expenses of the horse they are fostering such as water, feed, hay, shelter and grooming
- The volunteer foster home will allow Safe Haven to come and see the horse and property with or without notice.
- The volunteer foster home must understand that the horse is still considered the property of Safe Haven
- The volunteer foster home must understand that ongoing decisions about care will remain in the hands of Safe Haven
- The volunteer foster home must understand that Safe Haven makes all medical/surgical decisions about the horse in foster care. Safe Haven provides a contact for medical emergencies. Volunteers will not be reimbursed if they take the horse to another vet for exam, testing, or treatment, etc.
- Any horse entering a foster home shall have a foster form placed in his/her file.

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: $201 to $500

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  All equines have one set fee or donation amount.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Safe Haven Equine Rescue - Barn

4994 FM 2088 Gilmer TX 75644

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Richard Fincher

2. Contact's Phone: 903-762-1432

3. Contact's Email: safehavenrescue@etex.net

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Owners are:
Richard and Debbie Fincher they live on the property.

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Lease start date was 7/25/2015 and ends on 7/25/2018. Safe Haven plans on renewing this agreement when it expires.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     Safe Haven leases this property from Richard and Debbie Fincher. Services provided by owner - none, Safe Haven has its own utilities set up for the office, barn and paddocks. Safe Haven pays for the taxes on the property annually.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 1.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 10

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. We have 7 paddocks that vary in sizes and uses. We have a mix of fences from No climb to smooth wire. We have a barn that is 40ft wide and 100ft long it has 25 stalls, a feed room and a vet area in it. Stalls avg. 12ft x 12ft and 14 ft high. 5 paddocks have car ports for shelters and the others have trees for nature shelter. During bad weather the horses are brought into the stalls.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     We rotate horses through the different paddocks so the paddocks have time to regrow. We also plant grass seed while no horses are in them. We drag every paddock at least once a month. The number of horses in each paddock is based on the size of the paddock and the social structure of the horses going into it.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 12

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     We have a 50 foot round pen for ground work. We do not ride at Safe haven.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     We are in the process of becoming GFAS accredited.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Safe Haven has 1 stock trailer and 1 2 horse slant load trailer.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? No

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     We do not ride at Safe Haven therefore no tack is assigned to the horses. During winter if a horse needs a blanket then a correct fitting blanket is washed and used for the horse only. There is a hanging rack in front of each stall. Halters are washed and cleaned before the first use and attached to the stall door of the horse it belongs to.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     White boards with labels and pictures.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     We stall horse every night and turn them out everyday.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     We feed a senior feed and a 14% pellet feed based on the needs of the horses. We use supplements only at the recommendation of the vet.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The vet uses the Body Score at the first exam of the horse when Safe Haven acquires it.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Manure Management - All stalls are cleaned daily and the manure is piled in a field on the back of the property. This manure is picked up regularly by local gardeners for their compost. Carcass Disposal - This is handled by the vet. Parasite Control - All horses are wormed upon arrival and again every 6 months. We work closely with our vet on each horse as a case by case basis.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Identification All horses at Safe Haven will have a picture of the head, both sides, rear, and close ups of any unique markings in a web based file and in a hard copy file. 1st Aid - People There will be an emergency 1st aid kit kept in the vet area at all times. 1st aid will be given when and as needed by a certified volunteer. There is a list of names of certified volunteers attached to the 1st aid kit. 1st Aid - Horses There will be an emergency 1st aid kit kept in the vet area at all times. 1st aid will be given when and as needed by a trained volunteer. There is a list of names of trained volunteers attached to the 1st aid kit. Tornado - Safe Haven will be closed to the public and all visitors will be asked to leave at once if a tornado watch is issued in Upshur County. If a tornado approaches while people are on the property and cannot safely leave in time they will be allowed to take shelter in the home of Richard and Debbie Fincher. All horses are to be stalled as soon as a tornado watch is issued for Upshur County. Hail - All horses are to be stalled if there is a threat of hail during a storm. All people are to remain in the barn/office until the hail passes. Storm - Using common sense, taking into consideration: barn structure, trees, power lines, and the condition of the surrounding properties the Executive Director will decide if horses are kept in the barn or in the pastures during any storm. Loss of utilities - Any loss of utilities will be reported to the correct company as soon as safely possible. Fire Prevention - Combustible fluids are to be stored in containers that are made specifically to hold them and NOT in the barn or surrounding areas. Trash is to be disposed of properly and removed from the property regularly either by a service or a volunteer taking it to the dump. Brush piles will only be burned during proper weather conditions and will be watched closely until it is burned out. Fire extinguishes are located in the barn and office and will be checked annually. Fire detectors will be tested monthly. All doors will be accessible from inside and outside at all times. No smoking on property. Fire - In the event of a fire the following procures are to be followed: Once the fire is discovered, call out loudly "FIRE". Use a fire extinguisher and try to put out the fire. Have someone else call 911 if possible. If the fire is in the barn immediately evacuate the horses; note that the fewer people handling the horses at this point the safer everyone will be as horses will spook easily around fire. Horses should be in the paddock farthest from the fire. All volunteers and visitors should meet at the bridge.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The Executive Director lives on the property. All exterior gates are pad locked with no trespassing signs. There is a camera system in the barn that records at all times.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     We work with law enforcement in several counties. In our area it is the local constables that investigate animal cases. Upshur County Constable Office 301 E Butler St. Gilmer, Tx 75644 903-680-8356 ph 903-680-6769 fx There is no email for this office.

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     We work with many different counties in Texas, we do not turn down any law enforcement agency that request our assistance. Listed below are 2 that we work with most often. Camp County Sheriff Department 203 Tapp Street Pittsburg, Texas 75686 903-856-6651 Gregg County Sheriff Department 101 E. Methvin, Suite 559 Longview, TX 75601 903-236-8400 National Response for Disasters Code 3 Associates, Inc. 1456 Skyway Drive Longmont, CO 80504 303-772-7724 info@code3associates.org


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 01/17/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Daniel Kincaid

Clinic Name: Pittsburg Veterinary Clinic    Street: 203 N Greer Blvd.    City: Pittsburg  State: TX    Zip: 75686

Phone: 903-856-6518    Email: docdank1@aol.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Richard Fincher


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 18.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 18

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 25

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

13 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 17 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

30 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 11 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 1 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

12 = Total of 2d-2f

18 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            12 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            6 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$10220     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$2228     Bedding.

$7766     Veterinarian.

$2230     Farrier.

$1250     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$3164     Medications & Supplements.

$722     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$12489     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$40069     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

5400     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $7
Question 3 ($40,069 ) divided by Question 4 (5400).

Average length of stay for an equine: 180 days
Question 4 (5400) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (30).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses?

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Half of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Richard Fincher

         *Facility Participation:

         Safe Haven Equine Rescue - Barn

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. We are a healing facility and do not ride the horses at Safe Haven. We work on ground manners when leading and ground work in the round pen.