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Maker's Mark Secretariat Center

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/29/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Susanna Thomas

Employees:   Full-Time:  4  Part-Time:  1  Volunteers:  50

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. The Maker's Mark Secretariat Center maintains a details manual of Standard Operating Procedures. All staff members and interns are required to read and review the SOP manual at the start of their work at the MMSC and annually. Volunteers are given an oral overview of the SOP Manual and pointed to where it is kept should they wish to read the entire manual. New staff members are trained by either the previous employee to hold that particular position or by the Director. The MMSC currently has 4 staff members and each staff member is cross trained in each other's jobs and responsibilities. Everyone is expected to be able to help in the barn, for instance. Interns are trained by their respective supervisor, either the Barn Manager/Trainer or the Office Manager. A day-long intern orientation is hosted at the start of each semester, and training proceeds over the first week of the internship curriculum. Volunteers are assessed for skills and experience prior to their first day of volunteer work. They are given an abbreviated orientation and tour and are assigned tasks suitable to their skills and experience. Volunteers operate under the jurisdiction of staff members and cannot take on projects or tasks without staff member approval, in order to keep them and the horses safe.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  4

Number of Board Members:  15  Number of Voting Board Members:  9

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     All MMSC horses welcomed onto campus are matriculated into the Horse Centered ReSchooling Program (HCRP). Developed by MMSC Director, Susanna Thomas, a lifelong horsewoman and holistic thinker, the HCRP is based on the belief that to reschool a horse successfully and expeditiously, its mind, body, and spirit all must be tended to with equal care. Once the horse arrives at the MMSC, it is reviewed by a team of experts: dentist, farrier, vet, nutrition specialist, chiropractor, acupuncturist, and various practitioners of alternative therapies to ensure that the horse is as balanced physically from the onset, as it can be. From there horses are assessed for temperament and learning style in a round pen, using natural horsemanship and Tellington-Jones techniques, as well as mounted police “bomb-proofing” desensitization exercises. Training progresses classically then with in hand ground work, lunging and long lining, followed by interdisciplinary introductions to dressage, jumping, trail riding, cross country work, and, when possible, horse shows. This process can be made very flexible, and each horse progress through the program at its own pace. The MMSC staff monitor each horse through every step in order to avoid pushing it when it is not ready to be pushed or allowing it to advance too quickly and skip necessary steps, creating gaps in knowledge. The goal of this unique training program is to figure out who the horse is inherently, what its “horsenality” is like, to strengthen its weaknesses, to heal its wounds, whether they be physical, mental, or spiritual, to “find out what the horse wants to be when it grows up,” and then to find the perfect person to adopt it.

The MMSC also offers off-track Thoroughbreds for adoption in the Noble Horse Program. Noble horses are those that either need time to unwind and heal before they can commence a second career or those who may have a more limited athletic future due to an injury or age. Noble horses are boarded at a separate campus. They are evaluated by the MMSC, but have not been matriculated in our regular HCRP. The reduced nature of their adoption fees reflect the lack of training time and the possibility that their athletic careers may be limited.

The MMSC launched in 2016 a custom training program. This post-adoption care program offers flexibility in care and continued training for newly adopted horses. The program is designed for adopters who live out of state and need time to plan shipping for their new horse or for adopters who would like their new horse to gain more training either on the ground or under saddle prior to going home. Enrolling the newly adopted horse in our post-adoption and Custom Training Program will ensure the mind and body of the horse are kept active and engaged. The horse will continue learning and growing in the adopter's chosen discipline until the day it ships out. This custom training plan can be tailored to the adopter's wants and needs, ensuring their horse steps off the trailer at their new home fit and ready to begin their new life.

Also in 2016, the MMSC launched with the ASCPA's support the Clean Start: Let Down and Lay Up Program. Like soldiers returning from war, off-track Thoroughbreds have aching muscles and limbs, ulcers, and sometimes PTSD. They need time to heal - mentally, emotionally, and physically - and to learn to just be horses again. The MMSC's Clean Start program will allow horses to go directly from the track to a nearby farm for let down and lay up. Here they can unwind physically and mentally so they will be ready when they come to the MMSC to commence the Horse Centered Reschooling Program℠, a rigorous training curriculum that gives them solid foundations for loving new homes. This will allow horses to progress more quickly through the HCRP, enabling the MMSC to help rehome even more off-track Thoroughbreds.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 2

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. The MMSC offers internship programs in the spring, fall, and summer of each year. Spring and fall internships run 12 weeks. Students are required to work a minimum of two mornings during the week (Tuesday - Friday) and all day Saturday in addition. Interns are also expected to attend all educational field trips if their class schedule allows. We may take 3 field trips a semester, some of which have included the Churchill Downs Museum, Keeneland behind the scenes, the North American Racing Academy, KESMARC and many others. Summer internship sessions are flexible in length but must be no shorter than two weeks in duration. Students are expected to work a full eight hour day, five days a week, Tuesday through Saturday.

Two types of internships are offered - 1, a horse training and barn management internship and 2, a communications and business internship. The horse training internship exposes students to all that goes into transitioning a Thoroughbred for a new career using the Horse Centered Reschooling Program® developed by director Susanna Thomas. Interns will learn horse care and barn management and get an overview of what goes into running a farm including machine and equipment upkeep, paddock and field “repair,” ring and barn maintenance, as well as evaluating and prioritizing farm costs. A communications position gives students an idea of what it takes to run a not for profit business, everything from budgeting to fundraising, event planning to media outreach. Interns will be very involved in the day to day running of the MMSC business, from contributing to social media, orchestrating educational and fundraising events, to helping price and inventory merchandise, to greeting guests and conducting tours of the facility. Should they be competent riders, we give most communications interns the chance to work with the horses as well!

The MMSC welcomes volunteers of all ages, all professional backgrounds, and all levels of equestrian knowledge and ability. Everyone who volunteers at the MMSC comes, like each of our horses, with unique abilities. We need people in the barn, in the office, in our garden area and in our woods. We could use fundraisers and stamp-lickers, event organizers and seamstresses, mechanics and graphic artists, fence painters and, yes, even musicians! Come one, come all! “One criteria,” says Director Susanna Thomas, “is no volunteers in diapers—at either end of the spectrum!” Volunteers go through an orientation and are then welcome to come as much or as little as they desire. Volunteers are not allowed to ride the horses due to insurance limitations.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     All MMSC horses are matriculated into the Horse Centered ReSchooling Program (HCRP). Developed by MMSC Director, Susanna Thomas, a lifelong horsewoman and holistic thinker, the HCRP is based on the belief that to reschool a horse successfully and expeditiously, its mind, body, and spirit all must be tended to with equal care. Once the horse arrives at the MMSC, it is reviewed by a team of experts: dentist, farrier, vet, nutrition specialist, chiropractor, acupuncturist, and various practitioners of alternative therapies to ensure that the horse is as balanced physically from the onset, as it can be. From there horses are assessed for temperament and learning style in a round pen, using natural horsemanship and Tellington-Jones techniques, as well as mounted police “bomb-proofing” desensitization exercises. Training progresses classically then with in hand ground work, lunging and long lining, followed by interdisciplinary introductions to dressage, jumping, trail riding, cross country work, and, when possible, horse shows. This process can be made very flexible, and each horse progress through the program at its own pace. The MMSC staff monitor each horse through every step in order to avoid pushing it when it is not ready to be pushed or allowing it to advance too quickly and skip necessary steps, creating gaps in knowledge. The goal of this unique training program is to figure out who the horse is inherently, what its “horsenality” is like, to strengthen its weaknesses, to heal its wounds, whether they be physical, mental, or spiritual, to “find out what the horse wants to be when it grows up,” and then to find the perfect person to adopt it.

The MMSC campus can hold a maximum of 18 horses at one time. Ideally, 12-15 horses will be on campus at any one time. These horses will be in various stages of the HCRP - some newly arrived and in the beginning stages, some in full training, and some who have been adopted and are waiting to ship out. As horses ship out to their new adopted homes, new horses are brought into the program.

Horses in the Clean Start program also filter onto the MMSC's main campus and into the HCRP as they are ready. When horses are accepted into the Clean Start Program, they are in need of let down time or rehab from a current injury. These horses come with injury records and are also evaluated by a vet. The vet along with the MMSC staff establish a protocol of care and rehab for each horse in the Clean Start Program. During its stay in this program, the horse is periodically evaluated by vets and is also regularly seen and evaluated by a team of wellness experts including farrier, dentist, chiropractor, acupuncturist, and veterinarian. When the horse is fully healed and cleared by the vet and MMSC staff to begin training, it then moves to the MMSC's main campus and is matriculated into the HCRP. The Clean Start Program is currently funded by a grant from the ASPCA and from generous donations, and has room for approximately 3-6 horses at any one time.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     The MMSC only accepts registered Thoroughbreds into its Horse Centered Reschooling Program (HCRP). All horses are donated to the Maker's Mark Secretariat Center. When possible, the MMSC Director sees the horse in person prior to accepting it in order to evaluate its movement, feel its joints, and assess its personality. For horses not located in Lexington, KY, the MMSC requires that the current owner send conformation photos and a video of the horse at the trot, either in hand or under saddle. In addition, the MMSC requests a brief medical history on each horse prior to accepting it. The ideal horse for the MMSC program is 3-8 years of age with limited past injuries that will not preclude it from pursuing a second career. The MMSC does not accept into the HCRP horses over the age of 10 or horses that have experienced traumatic injuries in the past and are either not suitable for riding or are only suitable for very limited riding. Horses that require rehabilitation or let down time prior to matriculating into the HCRP to be adopted are admitted into the Clean Start Program, where they will be boarded at a foster farm until fully healed. These horses must have current vet records upon entry into the program and will have regular visits with a veterinarian to monitor their progress. Horses who are older than 10 years of age or who have significant limiting injuries may be accepted into the Noble Horse Program. In this program, the horses remain at their current location but are assessed for temperament and trainability by the MMSC staff. Their information and photos are posted on the MMSC website and social media. Again, owners of these horses must provide to the MMSC current medical records and vet reports detailing the nature of the limiting injury, which are then made available to interested adopters.

The MMSC Adoption Contracts states that should the horse adopted from the MMSC prove unsuitable for the purpose adopted, it can be returned to the MMSC at any point within 30 days of the adoption date as listed on the adoption contract. Upon return of the horse, the adopter will be given a credit for the sum initially donated at the time of the adoption, minus the expenses incurred by the MMSC for the care of the horse. After 30 days following the adoption date, the horse may not be returned to the MMSC for any reason, due to the very limited space on the MMSC’s campus. An exception to this policy is as follows: if the owner is truly in desperate need of finding a new home for the horse, and the horse still qualifies for acceptance in the Horse Centered Reschooling Program, the horse may return to the MMSC. The original adopter would complete an Intake Agreement, donating the horse to the MMSC and officially transferring ownership. Should the owner need to find a new home for the horse and the horse no longer qualifies for acceptance into the Horse Centered Reschooling Program due to age or injury, the MMSC will work with the adopter to find a suitable home for the horse. In addition to the above policies, the adopter agrees in the adoption contract that if at any point in time the horse is found to be in physical condition significantly less than that in which it left the MMSC or is found to be living in a squalid environment, this constitutes a breach of contract and the MMSC may repossess the horse without any notice or consent of the adopter.

The MMSC does not purchase horses. The MMSC does not work with local animal control officers to accept owner-surrendered horses or seized horses.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     The MMSC maintains a 2-week trial period on all horses that are accepted into the program. During that time, horses are evaluated based on soundness and trainability. Should horses be determined lame, in need of long-term rehab, or in need of permanent retirement, they are returned to their previous owner or invited to join the Noble Horse Program. The MMSC assists with placing the horse elsewhere if needed.

Horses leave the Horse Centered Reschooling Program when they are adopted by an approved adopter. Each horse is marketed to prospective adopters via photos and videos on social media, the MMSC website, and "for sale" ads on relevant websites (Eventing Nation, Retired Racehorse Project, etc.). Prospective adopters first complete an MMSC adoption application. The application includes a summary of the applicant's riding and horse experience, a description of the type of horse for which they are searching, photographs of the location in which any adopted horse will be living (barns and paddocks), and three references in the categories of Non-family character, Equine professional, and Veterinary. Each application is thoroughly reviewed by the MMSC Director and an Approval Committee made up of three MMSC Consulting Board Members. After being approved for adoption, the MMSC requires that all potential adopters travel to the MMSC and ride each horse they are interested in adopting, in order for the MMSC staff to assess their riding ability and their personality match with the horses. Should questions be raised at any point in the approval process, the MMSC Director will contact the applicant and talk through each issue, be it fencing concerns, financial concerns, or horse-handling concerns.

All prospective adopters are required to complete a standard liability waiver prior to handling or riding any horses. At this point in the adoption process, the prospective adopter has already communicated thoroughly with either the MMSC Director or the Barn Manager, including conversations about the prospective adopter’s current riding level, skill with handling horses, type of personality desired in a horse, and current available MMSC horses that may be a match for the prospective adopter. The MMSC staff also carefully reviews the adopter’s equine professional reference that is included in the adoption application, and if necessary speaks directly to the equine professional. Upon arrival at the MMSC, and after signing a standard liability waiver, the prospective adopter may meet and handle any of the horses previously discussed as potential matches. The prospective adopter may then ride any of those same horses, following a ride by the Barn Manager or current Head Rider or Trainer. If at any point while the MMSC staff is riding the horse to show to the prospective adopter, the horse should appear unsafe for the prospective adopter to ride, or unsound in any fashion, the prospective adopter will not be allowed to ride the horse on that day. All rides occur in the MMSC’s arena, and if necessary, the MMSC staff may begin by lunging the rider on the horse to ensure safety.

Each foster facility is heavily screened prior to becoming a foster farm for the MMSC. Interested facilities must complete a Foster Farm Application and be approved by the MMSC Executive Director and the Application Review Committee. The MMSC Executive Director also visits each farm in person and talks in depth with the foster care provider about the MMSC’s programs, practices, and protocols. The foster care provider must be an extremely knowledgeable horseperson with experience handling Thoroughbreds and experience in rehabbing horses.

Each foster care facility receives a binder containing basic information about the MMSC and its programs, as well as information about the MMSC’s horse care practices and protocols. For each horse boarded at the foster farm, the MMSC provides 5 conformation photos of the horse (left, right, front, back, and head), a current Care Schedule detailing the horse’s vaccination, deworming, farrier, and vet records, copies of the horse’s negative Coggins and health certification, and information pertaining to any injury for which the horse is in rehabilitation. The notes on the horse’s injury include current care protocols, a rehabilitation schedule, and information on follow-up vet appointments. The foster care provider stays in close contact with the MMSC staff and MMSC staff make a point of going to the foster farm to see the horses in person regularly.

The MMSC has one foster farm currently, where denizens of the Clean Start Program are boarded. These horses are those retired from racing with an active injury and which need rehabilitation before joining the MMSC’s Horse Centered Reschooling Program. They are on full care board at the foster farm, which the MMSC receives at a discounted rate. When they are cleared by a vet and the MMSC staff to begin training for a new career, they leave the foster farm and are transferred to the MMSC’s main campus where they matriculate into the HCRP.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     After a horse has been seen by the MMSC Director and accepted into the Horse Centered Reschooling Program (HCRP), the current owner of the horse is required to complete and submit an Intake Form prior to the horse's arrival on the MMSC campus. The owner must answer questions about the horse's health and medical history including: all past or current injuries, surgeries, and medical procedures, most current vaccinations and dates, date of most current farrier work, date and type of most current deworming, and date of most recent dental work. The owner must also answer a brief questionnaire about the horse's current living situation - what feed is it receiving, does it know how to drink from an automatic waterer, date of gelding, date of last ride, has the horse been turned out with other horses, and any vices the horse may have.

In order to be allowed onto the Kentucky Horse Park grounds, and thence the MMSC campus, all incoming horses must have a current negative Coggins test and a current health certificate. Upon intake, each horse is thoroughly evaluated by the MMSC staff, and injury records and history are made available to all individuals who will be working in close proximity with the horse. A fecal sample is taken for each horse when it arrives and the horse is de-wormed if needed. A blood test is also conducted if the MMSC staff deems it necessary. The MMSC works closely with Southern States Feeds, and each horse is evaluated regularly for body condition, with feed intake being adjusted accordingly. Each horse is handled every day in some capacity, from thorough grooming to training, in order to ensure health and wellness. Should an injury arise, it is dealt with quickly. Horses who have injuries or lameness issues that require limited mobility are kept on stall rest or on isolated small paddock turnout for the duration of their injury/lameness. Each horse is also regularly seen and evaluated by a team of wellness experts including farrier, dentist, chiropractor, acupuncturist, and veterinarian.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     During the hours that the MMSC is open, the Barn Manager is always present and available to oversee the facility. Interns are also employed and have a role in overseeing the horses and facility. Should a horse become injured and require a veterinarian, the Barn Manager will contact the MMSC's primary vet. If the primary vet is unavailable at the time and the injury is an emergency, the Barn Manager will call Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, located across the street from the Kentucky Horse Park, and ask for an on-call vet. After working hours and on weekends, the facility itself is monitored for safety by the Kentucky Horse Park police, and on weekends, interns or trained volunteers feed twice a day and look over every horse for any sign of injury. Should a horse be injured and need care, the Director and the Barn Manager are called and either go to the MMSC to handle the situation or issue instructions for how the situation should be handled.

Vaccination records are kept for each horse individually and administered as needed. Horses at the MMSC receive flu/rhino vaccines every 3 months due to the high number of horses coming and going on our campus. Horses also receive the following vaccines: Rabies, Eastern/Western Enchephalitis, West Nile, Potomac Horse Fever, Botulism, and Tetanus. A vast majority of horses coming into our program have already received these vaccines, and we simply maintain the schedule as needed. The MMSC's deworming schedule is based on fecal samples. We do not regularly deworm the horses according to season. Again, many of our horses received deworming medication prior to arriving at the MMSC and will not require further deworming during their time with us. All horses are seen by the farrier upon arrival at the MMSC, and are placed on a 4-6 week schedule going forward, depending upon the condition of the hooves. Most MMSC horses are shod in front and any horses able to go barefoot are kept barefoot.

Due to the MMSC's very public location at the Kentucky Horse Park, as well as our small campus size, we do not accept at-risk horses, geriatric horses, or horses with serious issues. All horses must be ready and able to begin training for a new career upon arriving on campus.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     The MMSC works with the center veterinarian and follows the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) euthanasia guidelines to decide if humane euthanasia should be administered to a center equine.

It is the responsibility of the Director to notify the Board of Directors if euthanasia is the recommended treatment for an MMSC equine. The Board of Directors does not have to approve such decision as long as the center director and the veterinarian are in agreement.

The MMSC will work to the best of its abilities to administer euthanasia on site in surroundings with which the horse is familiar.

In cases where humane euthanasia will require transport to an equine hospital or other veterinary institution, the MMSC will transport said horse to the nearest facility possible in order to minimize any further stress or undue suffering.

Acceptable methods of equine euthanasia are pentobarbital or a pentobarbital combination. In order to facilitate catheterization and minimize equine anxiety and stress, a tranquilizer such as acepromazine or an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist should be administered.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     The MMSC does not breed horses and does not accept pregnant mares nor stallions. All intact colts must be gelded and fully healed before being accepted into our program. There are no exceptions to this policy.

The MMSC does maintain a breeding policy in the adoption contract for all horses. Should an adopter wish to breed his/her mare, they must obtain written permission from the MMSC's Board of Directors AND the mare's donor. The adopter may not breed the mare for the purposes of racing or any form of racing.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     Yes

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     Each foster facility is heavily screened prior to becoming a foster farm for the MMSC. Interested facilities must complete a Foster Farm Application and be approved by the MMSC Executive Director and the Application Review Committee. The MMSC Executive Director also visits each farm in person and talks in depth with the foster care provider about the MMSC’s programs, practices, and protocols. The foster care provider must be an extremely knowledgeable horseperson with experience handling Thoroughbreds and experience in rehabbing horses.

Each foster care facility receives a binder containing basic information about the MMSC and its programs, as well as information about the MMSC’s horse care practices and protocols. For each horse boarded at the foster farm, the MMSC provides 5 conformation photos of the horse (left, right, front, back, and head), a current Care Schedule detailing the horse’s vaccination, deworming, farrier, and vet records, and copies of the horse’s negative Coggins and health certification. If the foster location is caring for horses in the Clean Start Program, information pertaining to any injury for which the horse is in rehabilitation is also included. The notes on the horse’s injury include current care protocols, a rehabilitation schedule, and information on follow-up vet appointments. The foster care provider stays in close contact with the MMSC staff and MMSC staff make a point of going to the foster farm to see the horses in person regularly.

The MMSC has one foster farm currently, where denizens of the Clean Start Program are boarded. These horses are those retired from racing with an active injury and which need rehabilitation before joining the MMSC’s Horse Centered Reschooling Program. They are on full care board at the foster farm, which the MMSC receives at a discounted rate. When they are cleared by a vet and the MMSC staff to begin training for a new career, they leave the foster farm and are transferred to the MMSC’s main campus where they matriculate into the HCRP.

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Over $1,500

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine level of training.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine age.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine type.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine health and soundness.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization approves of this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 2

.

Location 1 of 2
Maker's Mark Secretariat Center

4089 Iron Works Parkway Lexington KY 40511

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Susanna Thomas

2. Contact's Phone: 859-246-3080

3. Contact's Email: mmsecretariatcenter@gmail.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: The Kentucky Horse Park
4089 Iron Works Parkway
Lexington, KY 40511

Contact person: Laura Prewitt, Executive Director
info@kyhorsepark.com
859-233-4303

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     The lease agreement between the Kentucky Horse Park and the Maker's Mark Secretariat Center was entered into and effective beginning on Sep. 16, 2003. The lease is effective for 25 years, through the year 2028. The MMSC Board of Directors has recently begun consideration of long-term plans past the end of this lease. There are no solid and agreed upon plans at this time.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     The property is leased to the MMSC rent free for the first 15 years of the lease. For years 16-25, a rent charge of $2,000 per month will be charged.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: .


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: ~16

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. The MMSC campus has one barn containing 10 stalls. Each stall is 12x12. The campus has 11 pastures total. Four of these pastures are approximately 1 acre, 4 of them are 3-4 acres, 2 of them are approximately 1.5 acres, and 1 paddock is 0.5 acres. All fields are fences with wooden 4-board fencing. The four larger fields have one run-in shed each. The run-in sheds have 3 sides and are placed according to the weather and wind patterns.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     The horses are rotated between the pastures every 2-3 weeks. The larger fields can hold 3-4 horses each, and the MMSC can hold 12 horses on half its pastures easily. After 2-3 weeks, the horses are then shifted to the other half of the pastures.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 23

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     The MMSC has one outdoor, uncovered arena, a round pen, a free-jumping pen, and many trails. The arena is approximately 100 x 75 and uses footing obtained for free from the Kentucky Horse Park when the KHP renovated one of their arenas. The footing is in need of replacement and the MMSC has plans to launch a capital campaign for the renovation of the outdoor arena. The round pen and the free-jumping pen use the same footing. The arena is used for the majority of the training of the MMSC horses. It is big enough for 2-3 horses to be worked at once, for several jumps to be set up, and for an obstacle course to be placed inside. The round pen is approximately 60ft in diameter. It is used for much of the initial stages of the horses' training - ground work, at liberty work to determine horse' horsenalities, etc. The free-jumping pen is used to introduce the concept of jumping to our young horses. It is not designed for speed or jump height. Rather, it encourages horses to trot and to learn how to pick their feet up over poles and small crossrails or verticals. Many young horses are unsure of their balance with a rider on their back; the free-jumping pen enables the horse to figure out how to jump without also having to deal with managing a person's weight at the same time. The trails are maintained by a contract laborer and are used to give the horses mental breaks from the stress of a new training program.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     The MMSC is accredited through the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance. The MMSC received this honor in the fall of 2015 and has applied again in the spring of 2017 to maintain its accredited status. The MMSC has also applied for verification with the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries. The GFAS was impressed with the MMSC's programs and facilities, although the MMSC does not quality for verification with the GFAS due to our decision to allow adopters to breed their adopted mares in limited circumstances, as the GFAS requires a strict no breeding policy in all circumstances.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     The MMSC does not own its own trailer, but we do have access to trailers in the event of an emergency. The MMSC is sponsored by Brook Ledge Horse Transportation, which is headquartered about 5 miles away from the Kentucky Horse Park. Brook Ledge would be able and willing to assist in an emergency. Also, Hagyard Equine Medical Institute is located directly across the street from the Kentucky Horse Park and the MMSC. In an emergency, it is a 5 minute drive from the MMSC to Hagyard or vice versa.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     The MMSC has several saddles that are used in the training of the horses, including all-purpose saddles, jump saddles, dressage saddles, and western saddles. A saddle is fit to each horse when the horse is ready to be ridden, and it uses that saddle for the extent of its stay at the MMSC. The MMSC director and the MMSC trainer conduct saddle-fitting assessments. Horses are measured for blankets when necessary, and blankets are tagged as belonging to a specific horse. Horses are fit for the correct bit as well. The MMSC mostly uses 3-piece loose-ring snaffles of varying thicknesses. Once a bit is found that fits the horse, the horse will use that bit and bridle for the extent of its stay at the MMSC.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     The MMSC has a white board map of the campus prominently displayed in the barn. Each horse is listed on the map in its current herd and field assignment, along with a brief description that can be used to identify the horse in the herd. The MMSC also keeps photos of each horse easily available. These photos show the horse from both sides, front, and back in order to assist in identification.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     The vast majority of the horses located at the MMSC live outside in the pastures 24/7. Horses are grouped in herds according to their horsenalities and feeding plans. Care is taken to ensure that each horse is happy in its herd. Horses can stay in the barn when needed. Typically stall rest most commonly results from scrapes and bruises, lost shoes, etc. It is very uncommon for the MMSC to have horses in need of long-term stall rest at its main campus. When that is necessary, the MMSC develops an individual plan for the horse in conjunction with the veterinarian treating the horse. The MMSC has graduating pasture sizes that can be used to reintroduce the horse to turn-out.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     The MMSC currently feeds Southern States Bluegrass Oat Nugget, a large pelleted feed. A Southern States representative is available for nutrition consultations for any horse at the MMSC. Should a horse be in need of a different feed, such as a sweet feed, that can be arranged. Horses are fed in the morning and the evening. The feed is wetted at every feeding to help prevent choking. The MMSC is currently sponsored by GLC Direct, and every horse is placed on one of the supplements provided by this company, according to their need. The options are Actistatin, a joint supplement, GLC 5500, a general health and wellness supplement, and ProBiostatin, a probiotic supplement. Again, horses are assesssed as individuals and placed on further supplements according to their specific needs. The MMSC Director and the MMSC Barn Manager make these determinations.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The MMSC does not take in rescue cases, and so does not deal in horses that are severely underweight. Most of the horses coming to the MMSC are racing fit, and in need of a higher fat feed in order to return to a healthy weight suitable for other disciplines. A Southern States representative assists in assessing the Body Conditioning Score of each horse, and the MMSC staff adjusts the horses' feed accordingly. Horses lower on the scale receive more feed and more hay. Horses higher on the scale are grouped in a herd and receive less feed.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     The MMSC's Biosecurity Protocols are as follows: At MMSC: 1. Eliminate standing water 2. Maintain clean water tubs and buckets 3. Assign designated feed buckets 4. Assign each horse his own halter, lead rope, grooming equipment, and tack 5. Thoroughly wash and disinfect items (grooming tools, bits, equipment) at least four times per year 6. Disinfect your equipment and vehicle prior to entering the barn and pasture areas if they have been around sick animals 7. Work with veterinarian to develop and administer a herd health protocol that includes at least regular Coggins testing, vaccination schedule, and deworming strategy MMSC Visitors: 1. Provide a disinfecting foot bath for visitors to walk through before entering quarantine area 2. Provide hand sanitizer or a wash area and have visitors use upon entering and/or leaving quarantine area New Horses: 1. Require current negative Coggins test prior to entering your facility 2. Require nasal swab with negative strangles report. 3. Quarantine new horses for time recommended by veterinary advisor, depending on donor source/protocols at that prior stabling facility. a. Isolation facilities should at a minimum disallow any physical contact between horses and should limit/eliminate the ability of horses to pass bodily fluids 4. Only handle quarantined horses after handling all other animals on your property or properly sanitize before and after handling quarantined horse 5. Walk through disinfecting foot bath before entering and exiting the isolation area, where recommended by veterinary advisor 6. Work with your veterinarian to evaluate new animals for compliance with your vaccination and deworming protocols 7. Before integrating new horses to your herd administer all necessary vaccinations and other preventive health care measures as recommended by your veterinarian Managing Sick Horses: 1. Work with your veterinarian to develop an appropriate treatment and quarantine protocol 2. Separate the sick animal form the rest of the herd 3. Tend to the sick animal last, after tending to your healthy animals or properly sanitize before and after handling sick horse 4. Do not mix your sick horse laundry with healthy horse laundry or clothes 5. Stabling area and tools and equipment used in or around the affected horse should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected prior to other use. All biosecurity protocols were delineated with the assistance of the primary veterinarian. The vet is always consulted on matters of sick horses and biosecurity needs or concerns. Stalls are mucked out multiple times per day, with manure being placed in a manure spreader. When full, the manure spreader is emptied at the Kentucky Horse Park's main manure pile. The pastures and paddocks are dragged with a chain drag several times per year in order to spread the manure. Buckets are cleaned/scrubbed at least every 2 weeks and as often as needed with Pinesol or Dawn dish soap. The MMSC follows the protocols of the Kentucky Horse Park for the removal of a dead horse. In the event of a dead horse, call the Kentucky Horse Park at 859-509-1450 to get their protocol for removal service. Fortunately, the MMSC has never had to use this service. The MMSC deworms its horses according to fecal samples and the recommendation of the primary veterinarian.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     There are several critical incidences or crisis situation that are specific to our facility here at the MMSC. These incidences and the protocols for handling them are as follows: 1. Fire Call 911. Clearly inform them that the fire is in a "Stable" rather than a barn. By doing so you are letting them know that living creatures are involved, not just hay or other storage material. Evacuate all humans in and around the facility and call the Kentucky Horse Park Officer-on-Duty station at 859-509-1450. Evacuate the animals. Horses must be led out and away from the barn, otherwise they may attempt to return to the safety of the barn in their confusion. 2. Flood Evacuate all humans and/or horses and seek the highest ground possible. Call the Kentucky Horse Park Maintenance Department for their protocol, 859-259-4252. After the emergency has passed, make sure the blankets and tack have not been damaged and put them in a safe storage area for future use. 3. Intruders Remain calm. Try to call 911 without drawing attention to yourself. If you cannot safely call 911 during the intrusion, call afterward. Also call the Kentucky Horse Park Officer-on-Duty. Try to remember as many details as possible. 4. Loose Horse (within the MMSC campus) Notify the Director or Barn Manager. If you are with other interns or volunteers and you are all experienced with horses, try catching the loose horse by herding it into a confined space, but only if you can do so safely. If you are with another person, you can try catching the horse with another horse. Sometimes one horse will be attracted to or will be calmed by the presence of another horse. 5. Loose Horse (within the Kentucky Horse Park) Notify the Director or Barn Manager. If you are with other interns or volunteers and you are all experienced with horses, try catching the loose horse by herding it into a confined space, but only if you can do so safely. If you are with another person, you can try catching the horse with another horse. Sometimes one horse will be attracted to or will be calmed by the presence of another horse. Once the horse is caught, enclose him in a pasture or stall and notify the Kentucky Horse Park Officer-on-Duty. 6. Tornadoes Be prepared to move quickly. Tornadoes often give little warning. Horses should be left out i the pastures to deal with nature as they are meant to. Humans should seek shelter either in a basement area or the inner-most site of a building, usually a restroom. Have a battery-powered radio on hand to listen to for storm updates. Notify the Kentucky Horse Park and/or Kentucky Utilities of any power outages. If the situation is dangerous or life-threatening, call 911. Notify the Kentucky Horse Park of any downed trees.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     During the hours that the MMSC is open, the Barn Manager is always present and available to oversee the facility. Interns are also employed and have a role in overseeing the horses and facility. Should a horse become injured and require a veterinarian, the Barn Manager will contact the MMSC's primary vet. If the primary vet is unavailable at the time and the injury is an emergency, the Barn Manager will call Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, located across the street from the Kentucky Horse Park, and ask for an on-call vet. After working hours, the facility itself is monitored for safety by the Kentucky Horse Park police, and on weekends, volunteers feed twice a day and look over every horse for any sign of injury. Should a horse be injured and need care, the Barn Manager is called and either goes to the MMSC to handle the situation or issues instructions for how the situation should be handled. In addition, the Kentucky Horse Park restricts access to the overall park after dark. The MMSC front gate is kept shut after working hours. All doors and windows at the MMSC are kept locked when staff members are not present, and the feed room, tack room, and garage doors/windows are kept locked as well. In addition, the Kentucky Horse Park restricts access to the overall park after dark. All doors and windows at the MMSC are kept locked when staff members are not present, and the feed and tack room doors/windows are kept locked as well.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Lexington-Fayette Animal Care and Control 1600 Old Frankfort Pike Lexington, KY 40504 859-255-9033

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     n/a


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/14/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. True Baker

Clinic Name: Hagyard Equine Medical Institute    Street: 4250 Iron Works Pike    City: Lexington  State: KY    Zip: 40511

Phone: 859-255-8741    Email: tbaker@hagyard.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 15.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 15

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 20

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:In addition to the horses adopted out from the MMSC campus, an additional 5 horses were adopted out through the Noble Horse Progam. These horses were never on campus, did not receive training from the MMSC, and were adopted to knowledgeable horse-people who could handle their rehab and/or limitations and give them the training they needed. These additional 5 horses brings the total adopted horses from the MMSC for 2016 to 62. Also, two horses adopted out to new homes in 2016 were also returned in 2016. They are not listed above as returns because they both arrived and returned in the same year. One of these was adopted in January of 2017 and the other is currently still available for adoption. The nine horses transferred to another facility were either moved to Gemstone Farm to complete rehab time or returned to their original donor due to significant and lasting physical limitations. Finally, a note about the horse expenses. Because the MMSC is located at the Kentucky Horse Park, our manure removal services are covered under our lease with the KHP. Our horse care staff expenses include the salary of our barn manager/trainer as well as stipends for interns who worked in the barn throughout the year. There are thus no designated training expenses, because all training expenses are included with the barn manager/trainer salary. Lastly, our other costs include the complementary therapy expenses for chiropractic, acupuncture and massage, horse show entry fees, and winter boarding costs incurred in January and February when the MMSC's main campus was closed due to lack of an indoor arena and an abundance of snow and ice making training outdoors impossible. The six horses on campus at that time were moved to a nearby facility with an indoor arena until the weather improved.

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 65 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

71 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 57 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 9 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

66 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            5 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$13050     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$839     Bedding.

$7616     Veterinarian.

$9387     Farrier.

$3875     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$12881     Medications & Supplements.

$4764     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$46196     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$28083     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$126691     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

3720     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $34
Question 3 ($126,691 ) divided by Question 4 (3720).

Average length of stay for an equine: 52 days
Question 4 (3720) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (71).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? Most of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Less often than weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Not at all or when issue arises

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.



Location 2 of 2
Gemstone Farm

310 Ferguson Road Lexington KY 40511

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Diana Shoop

2. Contact's Phone: 859-559-8277

3. Contact's Email: equinemaid@mac.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Use

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Owner: Van Thompson
Address: 310 Ferguson Road, Lexington, KY 40511
Phone: 859-987-4447
Email: van.thompson@raymondjames.com

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Gemstone Farm is an approved foster farm of the MMSC under the MMSC's foster farm policies. It is also approved through the MMSC's Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance accreditation. As such, there is no specific start date and end date of the term of the agreement. The horses kept at Gemstone Farm are typically horses in the Clean Start Program. We pay to board each horse at Gemstone Farm at a set rate per month for as long as the horse needs, and a signed Foster Contract is completed for each horse.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     Diana Shoop leases the farm from Van Thompson and is the owner/operator of Gemstone Farm. She is the MMSC's contact. Diana provides whatever services are needed for each horse, be that stall rest with handwalking, limited turnout, or full pasture board. Each horse has its own needs and services for each horse are agreed upon prior to the horse arriving at Gemstone Farm. The MMSC pays for any vet bills or medical expenses directly. The MMSC also pays Diana a per month rate for board that includes feed and hay for each horse, and the MMSC also reimburses Diana for farrier expenses. Diana is very generous to discount her board for the MMSC horses, and she receives the difference in her full rate and the MMSC's rate as a gift-in-kind tax deduction.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: .


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 150

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. 2 extra large turnout fields, 4 large fields, 7 paddocks, 1 large pasture in back for retirees. All fields are fenced with 4-board fences. There are 2 barns, one with 18 stalls and one with 11 stalls. Both have excellent ventilation. There are no run-in sheds, but horses are kept inside in inclement weather.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     The horses are rotated between the fields as needed. Horses are grouped in herds according to their type, i.e. broodmares, yearlings, etc. MMSC horses are kept either in individual paddocks or are turned out together, according to their specific care protocols.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 23

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     No training is conducted at Gemstone Farm. MMSC horses located here are receiving rehab care or let down. They are kept in well-ventilated stalls when on stall rest and are hand-walked as required. Gemstone Farm has a graduating turnout system to reintroduce the horses to turnout when they are cleared to do so.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     The MMSC is accredited through the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance. The MMSC received this honor in the fall of 2015 and has applied again in the spring of 2017 to maintain its accredited status. Gemstone Farm is an approved facility of the MMSC with the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Trailers are located at Gemstone Farm in the event of an emergency.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     No tack is used at Gemstone Farm since the horses are not in training. Each horse has its own halter with its name on it, and the MMSC provides a blanket for each horse in the winter months. Should an MMSC horse need any additional item, such as a cribbing collar, it is provided by the MMSC.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Each MMSC horse wears its halter 24/7 in order to identify it. For each horse boarded at the foster farm, the MMSC provides 5 conformation photos of the horse (left, right, front, back, and head) in order to assist in identifying it. These photos are kept in the foster farm binder, easily accessible to the primary caretaker and the staff at Gemstone Farm.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Housing plans for the MMSC horses at Gemstone Farm are determined based on their current care protocols. Horses with an active injury are kept on stall rest until cleared by a veterinarian for turnout. Gemstone Farm has graduating pasture sizes that can be used to reintroduce the horse to turn-out. Horses on full-time turnout are brought inside for feeding in the morning and in the evening. In inclement weather, they are kept inside.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     MMSC horses at Gemstone Farm are fed grain and hay twice a day. Gemstone Farm currently feeds a special sweet feed mix, and each horse receives a grain amount that suits its current level of activity. Any supplements required are provided by the MMSC.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The MMSC does not take in rescue cases, and so does not deal in horses that are severely underweight. Most of the horses coming to the MMSC or Gemstone Farm are racing fit, and in need of a higher fat feed in order to return to a healthy weight suitable for other disciplines. When necessary, a Southern States representative assists in assessing the Body Conditioning Score of each horse, and the primary caretaker at Gemstone Farm adjusts the horses' feed accordingly.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     The MMSC's Biosecurity Protocols are as follows: At MMSC: 1. Eliminate standing water 2. Maintain clean water tubs and buckets 3. Assign designated feed buckets 4. Assign each horse his own halter, lead rope, grooming equipment, and tack 5. Thoroughly wash and disinfect items (grooming tools, bits, equipment) at least four times per year 6. Disinfect your equipment and vehicle prior to entering the barn and pasture areas if they have been around sick animals 7. Work with veterinarian to develop and administer a herd health protocol that includes at least regular Coggins testing, vaccination schedule, and deworming strategy New Horses: 1. Require current negative Coggins test prior to entering your facility 2. Require nasal swab with negative strangles report. 3. Quarantine new horses for time recommended by veterinary advisor, depending on donor source/protocols at that prior stabling facility. a. Isolation facilities should at a minimum disallow any physical contact between horses and should limit/eliminate the ability of horses to pass bodily fluids 4. Only handle quarantined horses after handling all other animals on your property or properly sanitize before and after handling quarantined horse 5. Walk through disinfecting foot bath before entering and exiting the isolation area, where recommended by veterinary advisor 6. Work with your veterinarian to evaluate new animals for compliance with your vaccination and deworming protocols 7. Before integrating new horses to your herd administer all necessary vaccinations and other preventive health care measures as recommended by your veterinarian Managing Sick Horses: 1. Work with your veterinarian to develop an appropriate treatment and quarantine protocol 2. Separate the sick animal form the rest of the herd 3. Tend to the sick animal last, after tending to your healthy animals or properly sanitize before and after handling sick horse 4. Do not mix your sick horse laundry with healthy horse laundry or clothes 5. Stabling area and tools and equipment used in or around the affected horse should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected prior to other use. All biosecurity protocols were delineated with the assistance of the primary veterinarian. The vet is always consulted on matters of sick horses and biosecurity needs or concerns. At Gemstone Farm, stalls are mucked out in the mornings and in the eventings, with manure being placed in a manure spreader. When full, the manure spreader is spread in a back field. The MMSC deworms its horses according to fecal samples and the recommendation of the primary veterinarian.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Basic safety precautions include keeping lead shanks on all stall doors at all times. Halters with name plates must stay on horses at all times. Barns can be closed off if needed with several gates. Other incidences and the protocols for handling them are as follows: 1. Fire Call 911. Clearly inform them that the fire is in a "Stable" rather than a barn. By doing so you are letting them know that living creatures are involved, not just hay or other storage material. Evacuate all humans in and around the facility. Evacuate the animals. Horses must be led out and away from the barn, otherwise they may attempt to return to the safety of the barn in their confusion. 2. Flood Evacuate all humans and/or horses and seek the highest ground possible. 3. Tornadoes Be prepared to move quickly. Tornadoes often give little warning. Horses should be left out i the pastures to deal with nature as they are meant to. Humans should seek shelter either in a basement area or the inner-most site of a building, usually a restroom. Have a battery-powered radio on hand to listen to for storm updates.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     Gemstone Farm is not located on a busy street and does not deal with frequent influxes of the public. At night, the main gate is closed and the barn doors are shut. The owner of the farm lives on site, and the primary caretaker lives next door. Both are available to keep the farm secure and safe.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Lexington-Fayette Animal Care and Control 1600 Old Frankfort Pike Lexington, KY 40504 859-255-9033

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     n/a


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/03/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Heath Soignier

Clinic Name: Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital    Street: 2150 Georgetown Rd.    City: Lexington  State: KY    Zip: 40511

Phone: 859-233-0371    Email: hsoignier@roodandriddle.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 2.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 30

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 50

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:MMSC horses at Gemstone Farm are in rehab or are receiving let-down time; they are not adopted out from Gemstone Farm but rather are transferred back to the MMSC's main campus to be adopted when they are physically ready to be in training for a second career. These horses are on full-care board, which includes feed, bedding, manure removal, supplements, barn supplies, and horse care staff. The board bill expense is shown under “Other Costs”. No horse training is conducted at Gemstone Farm. Farrier costs are listed separately on the boarding invoices, so that cost can be seen above. The farrier costs are low as the horses here are typically barefoot and only being trimmed when needed. Dental costs are incurred when the horses are at the MMSC, and vet bills and medication bills are included in the MMSC’s overall vet and medication expenses rather than being delineated specifically for this facility. This is due to the fact that the MMSC is sponsored by Hagyard Equine Medical Center and receives a certain amount of free care as well as discounts on most items from the pharmacy. The MMSC first boarded horses at Gemstone Farm in April of 2016. No horses were present at this farm on January 1, but nine horses were intakes throughout the year. However for the software here to accept the form, we have listed one horse present on January 1, and 8 horses as intakes later in the year. The three horses transferred to another facility during the year were moved back to the MMSC's main campus to be adopted.

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 8 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

9 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 3 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

3 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            6 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$0     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$0     Veterinarian.

$150     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$0     Medications & Supplements.

$0     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$3690     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$3840     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

454     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $8
Question 3 ($3,840 ) divided by Question 4 (454).

Average length of stay for an equine: 50 days
Question 4 (454) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (9).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? Most of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? Most of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses?

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Half of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? Some of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.


V. Instructors/Trainers

This section is required only for organizations that provide equine assisted assisted activities and/or therapies (EAAT) to people with special needs. It is optional but suggested for other organizations and an opportunity to share information about your instructors/trainers with the general public.