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Missouri Forget Me Not Horse Rescue and Sanctuary

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 03/30/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Connie Hendrix

Employees:   Full-Time:  0  Part-Time:  0  Volunteers:  15

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Volunteers are trained by the organization's president, Connie Hendrix, or other volunteers that have been working at the Sanctuary for over a year. Volunteers with less experience primarily do clean up chores, and only experienced volunteers are allowed around the horses to feed, groom, or other direct care. Volunteers work in pairs, and they always have a cell phone with them. Each horse has a card with feeding instructions that is kept in the barn.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  4

Number of Board Members:  5  Number of Voting Board Members:  5

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     MFMN provides three primary services – horse rescue, sanctuary and adoptions. These programs are critical to helping abused, neglected and unwanted horses.
MFMN works with law enforcement and other agencies in their efforts to rectify situations in which horses are in peril. The Sanctuary provides horses with needed medical care, proper nutrition and a health plan to restore them physically and mentally for a new life.
During their rehabilitation, horses will learn to begin to trust once again by living in a sanctuary free of fear, hunger and human caused pain.
Once rehabilitated, we will strive to find them a special home with people who will give them a new life where they will thrive in a caring environment. People applying to adopt a horse are thoroughly screened and they must sign a contract requiring that they return the horse if they decide they can no longer keep it.
Horses who cannot be adopted due to age or chronic medical conditions are cared for at the Sanctuary or a foster home for the rest of their natural lives.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 2

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. We also care for a few donkeys and a mule, but they are considered to be part of our "equine" program.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  Yes



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     We accept any horse, no matter breed, gender, age or medical condition, that is not wild or dangerous, based on our capacity at the time. We try to accommodate rescued horses that are in dire conditions at any time, especially if law enforcement is involved.

Every horse comes into feeding pens or the barn at feeding time twice daily, so their nutritional intake can be monitored and controlled. Supplements and/or medications are given at this time.

We do not stable horses, unless required due to medical treatment or refeeding starved animals. We have adequate pasture for horses to graze, self-exercise and interact with other horses in small groups. Our numbers are limited by the amount of pasture available for grazing, available stalls and other resources, such as volunteers and funding.

Horses that are sound and determined to be adoptable are evaluated to determine if training is required. If so, horses are trained or refreshed prior to being offered for adoption.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Horses are acquired by donation, surrender, seizure (rescue) and returns. We only purchase horses in situations in which the horse is at risk, due to neglect and/or abuse, and the owner refuses to surrender the horse unless they receive payment, and there is not enough time for law enforcement to take action. We do not accept wild horses or horses that are dangerous, and cannot be controlled.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     An adoption or foster application requiring 3 references must be completed and approved prior to adoption. Once the references and facilities are reviewed and approved, the adopter must sign a contract which specifies that no adopted horse can be given away or sold, but must be returned to the rescue. When the horse is ready for adoption, it is described on our website, Facebook page, and in our quarterly newsletter. For first time horse owners, the Sanctuary provides boarding for horses adopted from the Sanctuary for a monthly fee to facilitate the adoption.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Each horse entering our rescue program receives a wellness exam, vaccines, fecal exam with prescribed treatment, farrier and dental services. If the horse has been in a sale barn or auction or does not have up to date medical records, then it is quarantined for two weeks and Coggins test is performed.

When it is settled into the rescue's routine, its training and limits are evaluated. We have a non-breeding clause in our adoption contract so any stallion that arrives is segregated from other horses and is quickly gelded. If training is needed, we try to provide this when the horse is sound. With the help of our veterinarian, a recovery program is set and progress is recorded in each horse's file. Photos are taken regularly to document this progress.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Each horse is visually monitored twice daily at feeding time. Volunteers are trained to call to the attention of the ED any changes in a horse's behavior, soundness, eating habits or overall appearance.

Every horse is vaccinated annually with EWT, West Nile and Rabies. Fecal samples are tested quarterly and horses de-wormed as needed.
We have a mobile vet that visits the Sanctuary on a regular basis, and horses are transported as needed to equine clinics and hospitals for diagnostic procedures or surgery as required.

Special needs horses requiring medical treatment are stabled in the barn and monitored throughout the day (and night when necessary). There is a sling in one of the stalls that is available for use if needed. The ED has extensive knowledge of treating starved and abused horses and works with the veterinarian(s) to bring them back to health.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Our policy is to consider euthanasia as an option only when, in conjunction with a licensed Veterinarian, it has been deemed that the horse is suffering from pain that can no longer be managed at an acceptable level. Under no circumstances will a horse be euthanized simply for the convenience of humans or the operation. We follow the guidelines for euthanasia put forth by the AAEP.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     No breeding is allowed. If a horse is adopted from the rescue, adopters must sign an adoption contract that requires that adopted mares will not be bred. Studs are gelded while at the rescue facility and are adopted out as "geldings." There are no exceptions to this policy. Foster care givers cannot have stud horses if they are fostering MFMN mares.

Minimum time for mares and foals is 6 mo old unless deemed by veterinarian that the foal is causing issues to the mare and needs weaning sooner, or the mare falls ill or dies.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     Yes

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     Prospective foster care givers fill out a detailed application that describes their knowledge and facilities. Each farm is inspected for safety and recommendations made by the inspector. We call 3 references, their veterinarian and their farrier for opinions about the care giver's suitability as a foster home. If the farm and references check out, the foster care giver signs a contract specifying their responsibilities for caring for the horse(s). This includes agreeing to show the horse to prospective adopters. The contract also specifies that the horse remains the property of MFMN, and cannot be sold or given away. The MFMN ED keeps in contact with all foster care givers regarding the condition of the horse(s).

Most of our foster care givers are MFMN Board members or are in close proximity to the Sanctuary and volunteer there.

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: $751 to $1,000

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Adoption fees may vary depending on species.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine level of training.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine age.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine type.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine health and soundness.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization approves of this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 2

.

Location 1 of 2
Missouri Forget Me Not Horse Rescue and Sanctuary

1025 Heritage Road Linn Creek MO 65052

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Connie Hendrix

2. Contact's Phone: 573-216-3838

3. Contact's Email: connie@missouriforgetmenot.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 0.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 85

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. There are 6 enclosures/pastures including: 1 - 32 acre fenced pasture (easy keepers) 1 - 30 acre fenced pasture (young, aged and hard keepers) 1 - 12 acre fenced pasture (special needs horses - mares) 1 - 5 acre fence pasture (special needs horses) 1 Dry lot for special needs horses (blind, foundered, etc.) 1 Paddock behind barn (special needs horses) There are also 23 feeding pens and 2 round pens. The barn is a 36' x 40' metal building with 6 stalls for special needs horses undergoing treatment or refeeding and is also used to store grain, supplements, medicines and bedding supplies. There is also a free-standing 3 stall shed in the 5 acre pasture behind the barn.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     We have 67 horses at the Sanctuary, including adopted horses that are boarded there.   Each pasture is housed by a herd of horses that are compatible based upon agility, personality, and supportive needs, as noted above. Each pasture has its own water supply and grazing is supplemented with grassy hay bales available 24/7 from fall to late spring. The dry lot always has hay available, however, the large pastures have adequate grass and forage in summer to support the horses. There are also 23 feeding pens that are used to separate the horses while they are being fed grain and supplements.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 24

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     We are a no-ride facility. The large 60' round pen is used to evaluate and test ride horses for adoption. Horses are transported to the contracted trainer's facility and stay there during their training.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Missouri Forget Me Not Horse Rescue and Sanctuary is accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries effective Dec. 7, 2016.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     The Executive Director lives next door to this facility and she has a 3 horse trailer, and MFMN also has a 2 horse trailer and a specially equipped equine rescue trailer that is kept on the property. Her truck is always ready for an emergency trip. Our Veterinarian, Southwest Veterinary, is a mobile vet and he will make emergency calls as needed. Donna Ogle, VP of MFMN, lives 1/4 mile up the road from the Sanctuary, and she has 2 - 3 horse slant trailers and a 5 horse slant trailer with trucks to pull them, that can be used in case of an emergency.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? No

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     MFMN is a no-ride facility. Most of the horses at the sanctuary are not able to be ridden. Horses are lead around the facility using soft lead ropes loosely draped around the horse's neck. Halters are available if needed. Horses needing blankets in winter, due to age or health conditions, are assigned a clean blanket that is only used for that horse.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     An index card is kept in a file that has the name, description and pasture location of each horse. The index card also contains the amount and type of feed for the horse and any supplements or medicines that the horse should receive. The ED, Connie Hendrix, lives adjacent to the Sanctuary and she and other long-term volunteers are available to answer questions about the identity of a specific horse.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     The only horses that are stabled are horses undergoing medical treatment or on a refeeding program that requires they be in a stall. If the horses are physically able, they are turned out after the 8:00 am feeding and brought back into their stalls at the 6:00 pm feeding. All other horses are pastured. Also, one of the stalls opens into a fenced outdoor run.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     In order to monitor and control the nutritional requirements of each horse, they are put in separate feeding pens and fed based on instructions that are kept on index cards for each horse, in a file in the barn. We feed various horse grain products based on the nutritional needs of each horse. Each horse that requires grain or supplements, is fed twice daily and the amounts are measured based on each horse's requirements. Feed is soaked and chopped or pelleted forage is provided based on the horse's ability to chew. During the summer, there is adequate pasture for grazing. Horses with dietary restrictions that are kept in the dry lot have a large hay bale available 24/7. Other horses have large hay bales available to them 24/7 from late fall to late spring, depending on the weather and condition of the pastures.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The Henneke Body Conditioning Score is measured and recorded at intake of each horse, and we adjust our feeding plan based on a goal of maintaining a body score of 5. Horses with a body score below 4 would get additional feedings through the day. Those with a score of 7 or more would be given lighter calorie foods.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Stalls are cleaned daily and pastures and paddocks are picked and dragged on a regular basis. Manure from the barn and stalls is loaded in a manure spreader and spread on fields and areas where the horses are not grazing. Manure from the dry lot is composted. Carcasses are buried on the property on high ground away from any watershed.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     The facility is in a rural area surrounded by open pastures and farm land with water running through the property. The barn is metal with a dirt floor and hay is not stored in the barn. So, the chances of a fire in the barn are minimal. Horses are generally not stalled in the barn, so if a fire did start in the barn, there are halters and lead ropes hanging in close proximity to the stalls that could be used, if necessary to get the few horses out of the barn that would be stalled there. There is also a fire extinguisher near the entrance to the barn. If there were a tornado, then all of the pasture gates would be opened so that the horses could flea to a safer area of the 63 acre property and horses in the barn would be turned out to pasture. In case of a power outage, there is a gas generator available on the property. However, water would be available from the natural creek and pond. The property is generally on higher ground, so the likelihood of flooding is remote. There are a few trees on the property, but there is enough open pasture, that the horses should be able to avoid falling trees.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The Executive Director lives next door to the facility and the horses are generally in plain view of her house. Security cameras are used to monitor the barn, and there is only one entrance to the property, which requires going past the ED's house.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Camden County Sheriff’s Office 1 Court Cir Suite 13 Camdenton, MO 65020 sheriff@camdenmo.org (573) 346-2243

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Homes for Horses Coalition 4017 Bunch Walnuts Rd. Chesapeake, VA 23322 cindy@homesforhorses.org 757-932-0394 Humane Society of Missouri - Longmeadow Rescue Ranch 480 Josephs Rd. Union, MO 63084 Contact: Amanda Mullen, Director Tel: 314-646-5670 amullen@hsmo.org  


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/02/2017

Veterinarian: Barry Leek, DVM

Clinic Name: Camdenton Mobile Vet Services    Street: 411 West Lake Park    City: Camdenton  State: MO    Zip: 65020

Phone: 573-836-1346    Email: BarryLeek @aol.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 57.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 67

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 75

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:There were 10 horses that were being boarded for a monthly fee at this facility in 2016. The owner is responsible for all costs (with the exception of hay/grain) including farrier and veterinarian costs and reimburses the facility for these costs. All of these horses were adopted from the facility, and remained after adoption. Total number of horses at the facility includes these 10 horses.

59 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 23 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 2 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

84 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 16 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 4 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

20 = Total of 2d-2f

64 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            34 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            30 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$53182     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$2361     Bedding.

$18670     Veterinarian.

$8030     Farrier.

$1725     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$7305     Medications & Supplements.

$1265     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$1000     Horse Training.

$15873     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$109411     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

24150     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $5
Question 3 ($109,411 ) divided by Question 4 (24150).

Average length of stay for an equine: 288 days
Question 4 (24150) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (84).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? Half

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? 2-3 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 3 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Every two years

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.



Location 2 of 2
Foster Home - Donna Ogle

299 Heritage Road Linn Creek MO 65052

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Donna Ogle

2. Contact's Phone: 573-745-1448

3. Contact's Email: donna@missouriforgetmenot.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Use

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Same as above - Donna Ogle, VP MFMN, 299 Heritage Road, Linn Creek, MO 65052, 573-748-1448, donna@missouriforgetmenot.com

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   No

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Donna Ogle is the VP of Missouri Forget Me Not Horse Rescue and Sanctuary, and she fosters MFMN horses on her property.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     Donna Ogle provides hay/grain and pasture for the horses. She and her unpaid staff care for the horses. She is a 4-H Leader and the 4-H girls ride and also volunteer to care for the horses. The horses are fostered, so all veterinary and farrier costs are paid for by the Sanctuary. Donna receives no compensation for caring for the horses on her property.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 0.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 30

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. 1 - 7 acre pasture with 4 wire & T-post (top barbed) 1 - 15 acre pasture X3 cross fenced with 4 wire & T-post (top barbed) 1 - 2 acre pasture - 2 sides 4 wire & T-post (top barbed) 1 side 4 rail steel 1 side 4 wire (barbed top wire) & T-post with electric wire inside middle 1 - 100'x70' paddock w/10'x10' run-in with 4 rail steel fencing 2 - 10'x30' paddocks w/10'x10' run-in with 4 rail steel fencing 1 - 100'x130' paddock with 4 rail steel fencing 2 - 10'x16' paddocks w/10'x10' run-ins with 4 rail steel fencing 1 - 90'x90' paddock with 4 rail steel fencing (5 rail steel fencing splits the 100'x130' & 90'x90' paddocks) 1 - 40'x50' paddock w/10'x10' run in (4" cattle panel (minis only paddock) 80' diameter round pen - 5 rail panel 30'x60' barn w/ 22'x30' tack feed room - 4 indoor stalls - 1-8x8, 2-10x12 and 1-12x16

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Most horses are kept on the 15 or 7 acre pastures. Only those with special needs or foundered and are required to be dry-lotted stay in the smaller paddocks.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 24

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     80' diameter round pen w/fine sand footing. 135'x85' flat arena cleared in the 2 acre pasture, grass footing.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     N/A

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     There is 1-3 horse slant trailer, as well as 1-5 horse slant load trailer available, and a truck to pull them, located on the property.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? No

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Horses are only allowed to be handled/ridden under strict supervision of the property owner, who is extremely familiar with appropriate assessment of fitting tack.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     The owner and staff work with the horses every day, so they are very familiar with the horses and they can readily identify each horse. Pictures of each horse are maintained in a file and/or database that can be readily accessed, if there is a question about a horse's identity.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     MFMN fostered horses are not stalled. Any horses that require being stalled due to medical condition, are transferred to the Sanctuary and stalled there.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Horses have 24/7 access to hay and water. Feeding times are PM for the majority of horses at this location and AM feeding is also available for those that require it. Grain and supplements (if required) are portioned and weighed in zip lock bags with the horse's name and dispensed daily AM/PM.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Horses are evaluated daily by visual appearance or condition in accordance with the HBCS. Grain changes or other necessary medical attention is provided at any sign of noticeable change.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     All indoor and small paddock areas are cleared 2 times per day. Larger paddocks are scraped monthly and manure is hauled off property. Deceased horses are buried in an area away from the horses.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     The facility is in a rural area surrounded by open pastures and farm land with water running through the property. Horses are generally not stalled in the barn, so if a fire did start in the barn, there are halters and lead ropes hanging in close proximity to the stalls that could be used, if necessary to get the few horses out of the barn that would be stalled there. There is also a fire extinguisher near the entrance to the barn. If there were a tornado, then all of the pasture gates would be opened so that the horses could flea to a safer area in the adjoining 63 acre Sanctuary property and horses in the barn would be turned out to pasture. In case of a power outage, there is a gas generator available on the property. However, water would be available from the natural creek and pond. The property is generally on higher ground, so the likelihood of flooding is remote. There are trees on the property, but there is enough open pasture, that the horses should be able to avoid falling trees.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The owner of the property lives on the property, and someone is usually always there. The property is located 1/4 mile from any roads surrounding the property. The driveway is gated and fenced on all 4 sides.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Camden County Sheriff’s Office 1 Court Cir Suite 13 Camdenton, MO 65020 sheriff@camdenmo.org (573) 346-2243

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Homes for Horses Coalition 4017 Bunch Walnuts Rd. Chesapeake, VA 23322 cindy@homesforhorses.org 757-932-0394 Humane Society of Missouri - Longmeadow Rescue Ranch 480 Josephs Rd. Union, MO 63084 Contact: Amanda Mullen, Director Tel: 314-646-5670 amullen@hsmo.org


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/02/2017

Veterinarian: Barry Leek, DVM

Clinic Name: Camdenton Mobile Vet Services    Street: 411 West Lake Park    City: Camdenton  State: MO    Zip: 65020

Phone: 573-836-1346    Email: BarryLeek @aol.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 18.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 25

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 35

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Several of the horses at this location are miniature horses or ponies, so we can accommodate more horses for the acreage. We also keep more of the adoptable horses at this location that require training.

32 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 7 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

39 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 21 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

21 = Total of 2d-2f

18 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            15 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            3 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$12762     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$2074     Veterinarian.

$2677     Farrier.

$580     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$587     Medications & Supplements.

$144     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$8600     Horse Training.

$1764     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$29188     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

7550     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $4
Question 3 ($29,188 ) divided by Question 4 (7550).

Average length of stay for an equine: 194 days
Question 4 (7550) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (39).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? No

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? Half

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 3 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Not at all or when issue arises

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.


V. Instructors/Trainers

This section is required only for organizations that provide equine assisted assisted activities and/or therapies (EAAT) to people with special needs. It is optional but suggested for other organizations and an opportunity to share information about your instructors/trainers with the general public.