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Changing Leads Thoroughbred Retraining Project

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/30/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Alexandra Goodrich, President

Employees:   Full-Time:  0  Part-Time:  1  Volunteers:  10

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Volunteers are trained by the board member at the facility where they will volunteer. Volunteers are familiar with the facility, its rules and operations, and they ride and assist with the horses under the board member's supervision. Suitable volunteers will have extensive experience handling horses and familiarity with the Thoroughbred breed. Volunteers are required to sign a Hold Harmless Agreement that protects Changing Leads in the case of a volunteer's injury due to involvement with a program horse. Volunteers are also required to sign a Volunteer Agreement, which clearly outlines the program’s expectations of the volunteer.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  1

Number of Board Members:  3  Number of Voting Board Members:  3

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  Yes

If yes, provide the name, title and responsiblility of each VOTING Board member who is compensated: Both Kristin Murphy, Vice President and Secretary, and Angelika Beutel are compensated for their professional training services. See additional explanation below.

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Changing Leads Thoroughbred Retraining Project rehabilitates, retrains, and rehomes retired Thoroughbred racehorses.

1). Sudden Shift Fund: The Sudden Shift Fund is used to organize sound retirement for racehorses. Changing Leads works with prior owners, trainers, jockeys, veterinarians, and caretakers to follow a horse's remaining racing career, raise money to get the horse off the track, and eventually organize its retirement to Changing Leads while it is still sound and able to enjoy a second career. It is rare, however, that Changing Leads is able to raise enough money through its network alone to retire all of the horses the community asks the organization to watch and retire within a calendar year, so additional monetary assistance in this area is much needed. This fund is also used to obtain horses who are no longer racing but have been entered in auctions.

2) Rehabilitation: Upon entering the Changing Leads program, horses are given a period of time to let down, during which they learn to adjust to their new routine--daily turnout, socialization, etc.--and mentally and physically prepare for a new career path. The cost of caring for these horses averages $300 per month per horse and includes board, farrier, and veterinary expenses. Some horses require rehabilitation of injuries incurred prior to retiring from racing, and in these cases, care and veterinary expenses often exceed our average, depending on the specific needs of the horses and the nature and extent of their injuries. Rehabilitation can last anywhere from a few weeks to a year or more. Per the 2017 operating budget, the maximum allowable number of horses in rehabilitation at any one time is five.

3) Retraining: Horses are sent to one of two professional trainers on the Changing Leads Board of Directors, depending on the disciplines for which the horses appear best suited. Methods of retraining include lunging and ring work, as well as trail riding and other desensitizing activities, as needed. The cost of caring for horses in retraining averages $1000 per month per horse and includes board, farrier, veterinary, and professional training expenses. Retraining can take anywhere from a few months to a year or more. Per the 2017 operating budget, the maximum allowable number of horses in retraining at any one time is five.

4) Rehoming: The ultimate goal is to match each horse with a new owner who will care for it and ensure it's lifelong safety and happiness. Changing Leads makes good use of its trainers' network of professional and personal contacts to ensure each graduate continues to receive the same excellent training and care it did while in the Changing Leads program. (In 2016, all program graduates were rehomed within the network.) Changing Leads' trainers are involved in every phrase of the process, from the initial contact to signing the adoption form. The trainers assess the suitability of horse and rider, as well as the facility where the horse will live. Upon adoption, Changing Leads collects all contact information from the adopter and follows the adopter on social media--which, so far, has been the best way for Changing Leads to keep tabs on its graduates. A board member follows up one month after the adoption and periodically thereafter for one year. Changing Leads contractually has first right of refusal, so the Board is aware of any changes of ownership. Changing Leads' contact information is included on all papers pertaining to adoptions, with instruction to contact the organization if the horse ever needs a home for any reason.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 3

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. None

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Changing Leads accepts former Thoroughbred racehorses that are serviceably sound and, ideally, ready to transition to a second career. The 2017 operating budget allows for ten horses in Changing Leads' care at any one time. Changing Leads rehabilitates horses as necessary and begins retraining them for second careers as pleasure or sport horses, particularly in the hunter/jumper and eventing disciplines.

Changing Leads operates primarily out of Longview Farms near Birmingham, Alabama, a 500-acre professional hunter/jumper facility. The organization also utilizes Cross-Country Farm in Gray Court, South Carolina, and eventing/dressage trainer Angelika Beutel, who divides her time between Denver, Colorado, and Ocala, Florida.

A large part of the program is turning professionally-handled horses into amateur-friendly companions. Although it is repetition of certain basics—standing in the wash rack, getting brushed, learning stall manners—on-the-ground handling is incredibly important. Once the Changing Leads trainers have deemed the horses safe, talented junior and amateur riders are allowed to share in the retraining process. This ensures that the horses are comfortable with various types of riders.

Changing Leads trainers devise a riding plan for each horse based on initial assessment of its personality, physical talent, and attitude. All of the horses are turned out at night and are ridden 4-5 times a week. Changing Leads believes that every ride is a schooling session when dealing with young horses because they are constantly on a learning curve. Horse begin horse showing when they are mentally and physically ready. Oftentimes a horse is rehomed before then, based on its talent and potential.

When Changing Leads' horses are rehomed, it is always with the knowledge that they cannot race again or be bred for the purpose of producing racehorses. Our adoption contracts require the adopter to agree specifically that the horse will not 1) race again, 2) be sold for slaughter, 3) be sold at public auction, or 4) be bred. Changing Leads will only provide Jockey Club papers that have been stamped "Sold as Retired" to adopters. This ensures Changing Leads graduates will never race again.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Horses are acquired through donation or purchased with Sudden Shift funds. Changing Leads also will accept any graduate back into the program as a donation per its Return Policy (detailed below).

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Horses leave the program when they are rehomed. Changing Leads' trainers are involved in the entire process, from the initial contact to signing the adoption form. The trainers assess the suitability of horse and rider, as well as the facility where the horse will live, since the ultimate goal is to match each horse with a new owner who will care for it and ensure it's lifelong safety and happiness. In finding suitable new owners, Changing Leads makes good use of its trainers' network of professional and personal contacts, but also utilizes online advertising (Changing Leads website, Changing Leads social media outlets, and www.dreamhorse.com).

Changing Leads is not a retirement facility, but rather a retraining program, so it does not offer a permanent retirement policy. However, Changing Leads includes in its adoption contracts a Return Policy--which explains that, upon professional evaluation by Changing Leads' trainers, horses that may be retrained and successfully rehomed again will be accepted back into the program as a donation at a date to be determined by Changing Leads--and with instructions to contact Changing Leads if the horse ever needs a home for any reason.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     When new horses come into the program, donors are required to provide all information requested in the Changing Leads New Horse Questionnaire document -- health maintenance/vaccination records, medical treatments received, soundness issues, veterinarian contact information, and personality information relating to trainability and socialization with other horses. Generally, Changing Leads will only accept horses from individuals it trusts to provide accurate information. For the occasional horse that comes from an avenue for which Changing Leads has little information, a full health check is performed. Horses are required to have a negative Coggins test and be up to date on vaccinations prior to acceptance.

Upon entering the program, horses are given a period of time to let down, during which they adjust to their new routine--daily turnout, socialization, etc.--and mentally and physically prepare for a new career path. Prior to beginning retraining, any horses with injuries that required rehabilitation are examined by a veterinarian to ensure they have healed properly. The veterinarian, in conjunction with the Changing Leads trainers, will then create a work schedule by which the horses can safely return to exercise.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     A vaccination, deworming, and teeth check schedule is kept on every horse in the program and includes the date of last administration/check and type of treatment received. Because horses are boarded at three different facilities, program vaccination and deworming schedules may vary slightly while following the schedules required of the facilities where the horses are boarded. Teeth checks are performed when horses enter the program and every six months to a year thereafter.

Racing injuries vary and are treated accordingly, as recommended by Changing Leads' veterinarians. Treatment may include stall rest, individual turnout, or group turnout, as recommended.

Since Changing Leads is a retraining program, it is unlikely to accept any geriatric horses, at-risk horses, or horses with serious issues--unless an individualized plan has been created and agreed upon prior to acceptance.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     The Changing Leads euthanasia policy is consistent with that of the AAEP (American Association of Equine Practitioners). Changing Leads will NOT euthanize a healthy horse for space.

The following are guidelines to assist in making humane decisions regarding euthanasia of horses:
- A horse should not have to endure continuous or unmanageable pain from a condition that is chronic and incurable.
- A horse should not have to endure a medical or surgical condition that has a hopeless chance of survival.
- A horse should not have to remain alive if it has an unmanageable medical condition that renders it a hazard to itself or its handlers.
- A horse should not have to receive continuous analgesic medication for the relief of pain for the rest of its life.
- A horse should not have to endure a lifetime of continuous individual box stall confinement for prevention or relief of unmanageable pain or suffering.

Techniques for Euthanasia – The following techniques for performing euthanasia of horses by properly trained personnel are deemed acceptable:
- Intravenous administration of a solution of concentrated potassium chloride (KCl) with the horse in a surgical plane of general anesthesia.
- Intravenous administration of an overdose of barbiturates
- Alternative methods may be necessary in special circumstances.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     Changing Leads has a no-breeding policy. The organization asks that stallions are castrated prior to entering the program, but if that is not possible, they are castrated immediately upon entering the program. Changing Leads does not accept mares with foals.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Over $1,500

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine level of training.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine health and soundness.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization approves of this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: Fees asked for the horses are determined by the market value of horses at that particular level of training, with any health or soundness issues considered. Some horses are placed at no fee, while horses who have extensive training and show experience with no soundness issues are offered at fair market value.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 3

.

Location 1 of 3
Longview Farms

14491 Co Rd 43 Vandiver AL 35176

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Kirstin Murphy

2. Contact's Phone: 205-337-6856

3. Contact's Email: kvfoust@bellsouth.net

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Use

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Murphy, Sr. (Mary Ellen)
14491 Hwy. 43
Vandiver, AL 35176
(205) 672-2046

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     February 2014--Present

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     Changing Leads pays Longview Farms on a monthly basis for board, care, and training.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 3.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 200

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. There are two pastures (both 20+ acres) with horse wire, wood, and electric fencing; one round pen with wood fencing; and one 44-stall barn.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Most horses are turned out at night in one of the two pastures (usually about ten horses in each pasture), and are up during the day. Some horses are turned out individually or in a small group in the pastures during the day. The round pen is used for horses that need an hour or so of restricted turnout.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 12

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Horses are schooled in a large (150 x 250-foot) arena with river sand and limestone mixed footing. Longview Farms is owned and operated by Dennis Murphy, Sr.--a former Olympic Showjumping Team member and Pan American Gold Medalist--and Changing Leads defers to his years of expertise with regard to the suitability and condition of the arena, barn, and pastures.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     At least one Longview Farms-owned trailer is available at all times for emergency horse transport. There are also two on-call veterinarians.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Longview Farms is a professional hunter/jumper training facility, so each horse is evaluated by one of the trainers, who then chooses tack, fits blankets, and decides on boots/wraps/etc. All volunteers then use that template to prepare horses for training.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Longview Farms employs two full-time professional trainers--Dennis Murphy, Jr. and Kirstin Murphy--and two part-time employees, one of whom has been the barn manager for 30+ years. All employees can easily identify each horse on the property. Clients never handle horses that do not belong to them, unless specifically directed to or granted permission to by one of the professional trainers. Volunteers are introduced to each Changing Leads horse, and a trainer supervises the volunteers at all times. All horses are assigned a stall upon arrival and rarely move stalls. All Changing Leads horses wear halters with nameplates bearing either the horse's name or "Changing Leads."

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Each horse has its own stall and is usually up during the day and turned out in one of the two pastures at night. Some horses are turned out individually or in a small group in the pastures during the day. For horses entering the Changing Leads program, turnout is introduced gradually, beginning with supervised round pen turnout, progressing to supervised small group turnout in one of the pastures during the day, and culminating with full group turnout in one of the pastures at night.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     All horses receive 10% sweet feed mixture with whole corn, grass hay, and electrolytes. Hoof, coat, and weight gain supplements may be given, depending on the needs of each horse.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Changing Leads horses usually enter the program appearing moderately thin (4) to moderate (5). The organization prefers its horses to be moderate (5) to moderately fleshy (6). Many horses easily achieve this score on their own after a couple of weeks or months. Horses that are moderately thin may be given alfalfa hay and weight gain supplements if they do not begin to gain weight on their own, and they may be limited to several hours of daytime turnout rather than full nighttime turnout. Any horse that appears to be going the wrong way on the scale is taken out of training and given a full vet check before returning to training.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     In accordance with the veterinarians' recommendations, all horses must have a negative Coggins test and be vaccinated against encephalitis (EEE & WEE), flu/rhino (EHV-1 & EHV-4), rabies, strangles, and tetanus. Any horse that arrives on the premises without the full referenced list of vaccinations will be given the missing vaccinations immediately. Vaccinations are administered every January. All horses are dewormed every other month. Longview Farms comprises 500 acres, a portion of which is used for manure disposal. There is also acreage used as a cemetery. Longview owns a backhoe that is used for burials. The veterinarian performs a full autopsy prior to burial.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     There are two fire extinguishers located in the barn, as well as a NOAA weather radio. The owners live on the farm, as does a caretaker.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     There is an on-premises caretaker.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Shelby County Police Department (Main Office) P.O. Box 1095 380 McDow Road Columbiana, AL 35051 (205) 669-4181

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     N/A


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/14/2017

Veterinarian: Scott Owen/Kristin Varga

Clinic Name: Southern Equine Services    Street: 2202 Hwy 61    City: Columbiana  State: AL    Zip: 35051

Phone: 205-669-9118    Email: southernequine@rocketmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Dennis Murphy, Jr.

     2. Instructor: Dennis Murphy, Sr.

     3. Instructor: Kirstin Murphy


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 4.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 40

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 44 s

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Changing Leads pays Longview Farm $27.50 per day for combined board & training (total amount for 2016 split between Feed and Training categories). Board includes feed (grain/hay), bedding, water, and care. Horse/barn supplies is blankets. Medication/supplements include dewormer. Dentistry services provided by veterinarian - costs covered under veterinarian category.

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 11 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

20 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 6 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 9 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

15 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            5 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$30662     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$1376     Veterinarian.

$4600     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$585     Medications & Supplements.

$192     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$30662     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$68077     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

2270     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $30
Question 3 ($68,077 ) divided by Question 4 (2270).

Average length of stay for an equine: 114 days
Question 4 (2270) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (20).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses?

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Half of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.



Location 2 of 3
Cross-Country Farm

5691 Greenpond Road Gray Court SC 29645

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Sherry Traynham

2. Contact's Phone: 864-684-7115

3. Contact's Email: crosscountryfarm3@gmail.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Use

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Sherry Traynham
5691 Greenpond Road
Gray Court, SC 29645
864-684-7115

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   No

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     January 2016 - Present

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     Changing Leads boards horses at this facility. This includes pasture turnout, hay, grain, water, and other maintenance as needed. Changing Leads pays the owner $300 per month per horse.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 0.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 40

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. - There are six pastures, all with access to wooden/metal roof run-in sheds and all with wire fencing bordered with electrical wire. - There are two single turnout paddocks, all with access to wooden/metal roof run-in sheds and all with wire fencing bordered with electrical wire. - There is one wooden 5-stall barn.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     With 17 horses total on the 40 acre property, horses have more than the recommended acreage per horse (more than 2 acres per horse). Horses are separated into small groups (minimum two horses but no more than four) based on the size of the pasture where they are turned out.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 24

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     There are two sand arenas at the farm - one dressage arena and a jumping arena. Footing is manicured as needed to keep it soft and adequate for lunging, walk/trot/canter work, and jumping.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     The owner of the farm who lives on the premises has a truck and trailer available for emergency horse transportation at any time if needed. Veterinarian on call 24/7.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     All Changing Leads horses are ridden in plain or french link snaffle bits at all times. Horses are lunged in side reins as needed. Use of other training aids (spurs, dressage whips, martingales, etc.) are generally discouraged and if used, must be approved by the Changing Leads representative prior to use. Sheep skin half-pads, clean saddle pads, and front brushing boots are required, and horses are worked in the same tack consistently once the most suitable tack has been determined.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     There is a white board hanging in the barn that includes a map of the farm and where each horse is turned out. Only the owner, caretaker, or trained volunteers who know all the horses on the farm are allowed to feed or handle the Changing Leads horses.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     The horses at this facility are turned out 100% of the time.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Horses are fed a high-quality sweet feed twice per day. Most of the thoroughbreds in the program also receive a scoop of high-fat grain and a mineral supplement to help maintain or improve their weight and condition. All horses on the farm have access to high quality hay at all times via round bales in each pasture.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Changing Leads horses usually enter the program appearing moderately thin (4) to moderate (5). The organization prefers its horses to be moderate (5) to moderately fleshy (6). Many horses easily achieve this score on their own after a couple of weeks or months. Horses that are moderately thin may be given alfalfa hay and weight gain supplements if they do not begin to gain weight on their own, and they may be limited to several hours of daytime turnout rather than full nighttime turnout. Any horse that appears to be going the wrong way on the scale is taken out of training and given a full vet check before returning to training.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     All horses must have a negative Coggins test and be vaccinated against encephalitis (EEE & WEE), flu/rhino (EHV-1 & EHV-4), rabies, strangles, and tetanus. Any horse that arrives on the premises without the full referenced list of vaccinations will be given the missing vaccinations immediately. All horses are dewormed every other month. New horses to the farm are turned out alone in a single turnout paddock for several days for monitoring before introduction to another horse. Carcasses are buried in the ground. Manure is disposed of regularly in a dedicated area.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     There is a fire extinguisher mounted in the barn hallway.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     Cross-Country Farm has two people living on the premises - the owner and the caretaker. Their residences are at each entrance to the farm where they can monitor coming and going. There is no security system.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Laurens County Animal Control 79 Mount Vernon Church Road Laurens, SC 29360

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     none


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/31/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Derek Wessinger

Clinic Name: Cleveland Park Animal Hospital    Street: 126 Woodland Way    City: Greenville  State: SC    Zip: 29601

Phone: 864-516-8779    Email: informcpah@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 4.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 17

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 20

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Board at this facility costed $275 per horse per month in 2016 and included feed/hay, pasture, water, and all other care. Dentistry care was provided by the veterinarian as needed and is thus included under veterinary costs. Horse/Barn Supplies cost are turnout blankets. Medications/Supplements cost are dewormer.

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 11 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 1 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

13 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 3 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 6 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

9 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            4 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$11275     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$2054     Veterinarian.

$1325     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$62     Medications & Supplements.

$391     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$15107     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

1460     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $10
Question 3 ($15,107 ) divided by Question 4 (1460).

Average length of stay for an equine: 112 days
Question 4 (1460) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (13).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? No

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Less often than weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.



Location 3 of 3
Hobby Horse Farms

5220 Bella Rose Parkway Firestone CO 80520

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Kris Espinosa

2. Contact's Phone: 303-834-0176

3. Contact's Email: espinkr1@yahoo.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Use

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Kris Espinosa
5220 Bella Rosa Parkway
Firestone, CO 80520
303-834-0176
espinkr1@yahoo.com

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     May 2015 - Present

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     Changing Leads boards horses at this facility. This includes pasture turnout, hay, grain, water, and other maintenance as needed. Changing Leads pays the owner $425 per month per horse.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 1.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 15

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. - Temperature-control main barn with 12x12 box stalls, some stalls with individual attached paddock areas - Attached barn with 12x12 box stalls - Covered 12x12 paddocks with attached outside run area - Pasture/turnout areas of various sizes - metal fencing

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Horses are turned out to pasture daily in rotating day/night schedules.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 12

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     There are two large outdoor sand arenas with lights and metal fencing. There is one heated indoor arena with sand footing. The footing in all three rings is maintained as needed to keep it soft and suitable for lunging, flat work, and jumping.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Van available and vet on call at all times.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Most Changing Leads horses are ridden in plain or french link snaffle bits at all times. Horses are lunged in side reins as needed. Use of other training aids (spurs, dressage whips, martingales, etc.) are generally discouraged and if used, must be approved by the Changing Leads representative prior to use. Sheep skin half-pads, clean saddle pads, and front brushing boots are usually used, and horses are worked in the same tack consistently once the most suitable tack has been determined.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Horses have stall cards including a picture and turnout information to help identify the horse in the pasture if it is not in its stall.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     All Changing Leads horses who are sent to this facility are able to be turned out daily with groups - either at night or during the day.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Horses receive a mix of grass and alfalfa hay while in stalls and unlimited access to grass round bales while turned out. Sweet grain mix and other supplements as requested are provided twice a day.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Changing Leads horses usually enter the program appearing moderately thin (4) to moderate (5). The organization prefers its horses to be moderate (5) to moderately fleshy (6). Many horses easily achieve this score on their own after a couple of weeks or months. Horses that are moderately thin may be given alfalfa hay and weight gain supplements if they do not begin to gain weight on their own, and they may be limited to several hours of daytime turnout rather than full nighttime turnout. Any horse that appears to be going the wrong way on the scale is taken out of training and given a full vet check before returning to training.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     As recommended by the veterinarian Changing Leads uses at this facility, all horses are dewormed twice a year and kept up-to-date on all vaccines recommended for the area. New horses to the facility are required to be up-to-date on all vaccines prior to arrival. Carcasses are disposed of off the property. Manure is disposed of regularly in a dedicated area.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Fire extinguishers are mounted in the barn. Metal doors close off all openings to the barns to protect the horses from the elements when necessary.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     Yes, two caretakers live on the property and conduct regular horse checks late in the evening and early in the morning.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Weld County Sheriff's Office Animal Control Unit 1950 O Street Greeley, CO 80631 970-356-4015 x2849 contactweld@co.weld.co.us

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     n/a


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/31/2017

Veterinarian: Dale Bowers

Clinic Name: Boulder Performance Equine    Street: 2542 Lanyon Drive    City: Longmont  State: CO    Zip: 80503

Phone: 303-946-1206    Email: drdalebowers@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Angelika Beutel


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 2.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 75

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 75

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Board at this facility costed $425 per horse per month in 2016 and included feed/hay, pasture, water, and all other care - captured under "feed (grain/hay)" category. Dentistry care was provided by the veterinarian as needed and is thus included under veterinary costs.

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 3 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

5 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 4 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

4 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            1 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$6375     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$1235     Veterinarian.

$725     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$372     Medications & Supplements.

$123     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$4496     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$13326     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

457     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $29
Question 3 ($13,326 ) divided by Question 4 (457).

Average length of stay for an equine: 91 days
Question 4 (457) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (5).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Half of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? Half of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? Most of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Angelika Beutel

         *Facility Participation:

         Hobby Horse Farms

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No


     2. *Instructor: Dennis Murphy, Jr.

         *Facility Participation:

         Longview Farms

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. A second generation horseman, Dennis Murphy, Jr., "Pete," has shown hunters and jumpers for the past 35 years. He has been instrumental in training several nationally recognized horses and riders, including Grand Prix horses "Irish Hunt," "Diamond Elle," "Set Sail," "ML Hartwick," and "Continental B." Highlights of the last few years include a recent prix win and 3 more top 8 placings at the Auburn Summer Horse Show Series, a second at the Jumpin' into June Prix in Louisiana, a win in the Gallop Around Louisiana Welcome Stake, and top 12 placings in Prix classes in Atlanta, Louisiana, the AHJA Year End Finals show (2008 and 2009), and Pine Mountain, Georgia. With ML Hartwick he won several 1.25 Mini-Prixs and Welcome Stake classes in 2014. He has piloted Lila Sessums' Thoroughbred "Jet" to top placings in both the 2011 5 Year Old and 2012 6 Year Old Young Jumper Championships and Alexandra Goodrich's Thoroughbred hunter "Mocoa Man" to Pre-Green Incentive Stake Class wins and 3rd in the nation in Thoroughbred rankings in the pre-Green Incentive in 2014. He is dedicated to passing on the knowledge and skill of his father to both horses and students, and continues to espouse a classical training system that harks back to his father's days riding with the legendary Bertelan de Nemethy. Pete, too, competed in the 2016 Retired Racehorse Project's Thoroughbred Makeover Show--finishing 11th of 61 in Show Jumping aboard Changing Leads' Throckmorton--and looks forward to returning in 2017.


     3. *Instructor: Dennis Murphy, Sr.

         *Facility Participation:

         Longview Farms

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. A lifelong horseman, Dennis Murphy, Sr. has spent more than 4 decades at the top of the hunter/jumper profession. He is an avid Thoroughbred proponent and has owned and trained some of the great showjumpers of our time, including "Do Right," "Tuscaloosa," "Lyrical Lou," and "Continental B." In addition to 3 decades of Grand Prix wins in America and across Europe, Dennis rode for the United States on the 1976 Olympic Showjumping Team in Montreal and was chosen for the team for the 1980 games. In 1974 he was a member of the US team that won the Nation's Cup at both the National Horse Show and the Washington International Horse Show. He won Gold at the 1976 Pan Am Games. In 1978 he won the Washington International Horse Show International Rider Champion Award and in 1980 he set the world outdoor high jump record (7'8") on "Lyrical Lou." He finished out his active showing career with a win at the Atlanta Classic Grand Prix in 1999 aboard "Continental B." Just this year, he was honored to be invited to the Washington International Horse Show to receive a lifetime achievement award. Dennis plays an important advisory role in Changing Leads' operations at Longview, for which the organization is incredibly grateful.


     4. *Instructor: Kirstin Murphy

         *Facility Participation:

         Longview Farms

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Kirstin Murphy is a third generation horsewoman. She was raised in Pony Club in New Jersey, evented, foxhunted, and cared for her own ponies every day. She later moved to the hunter ring, and has trained countless green horses (many of them off-track Thoroughbreds) and riders and led them to numerous year-end titles in Louisiana and Alabama. Her recent wins in the "A" hunter ring include Brownland Farms (TN), Tryon International Equestrian Center, and 3rd in the National Hunter Derby at the Louisiana Fall Classic (2015). She is a USEF "r" rated judge in Hunters and Equitation, and has recently produced Alabama year-end series champions and reserve champions in the 2'3", 2'6" and 3' hunters, Adult hunters, Adult equitation and the JR/Amateur Medal class. She recently completed her term as President of the Board of Directors for the Alabama Hunter Jumpers Association. She participated in the Retired Racehorse Project's Thoroughbred Makeover Show in 2016 and is looking forward to returning again in 2017.