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Eagle Mount Bozeman

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 07/08/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Mary Peterson, Executive Director

Employees:   Full-Time:  11  Part-Time:  15  Volunteers:  790

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. New employees attend an orientation with the Chief Financial Officer. This meeting includes the review of their job description, timesheets, policy manual, incident reporting and handling, computer log on/training, database entry training, phone system training and opening and closing of office procedure. All employees have annual reviews with their supervisors. Program Directors report to the Executive Director.
Volunteers attend mandatory training for each activity they are volunteering in (i.e. skiing, aquatics, horticulture). Therapeutic Horsemanship (TH) volunteers attend mandatory trainings which adhere to the PATH International Standards regarding volunteer training. TH staff solicits input regarding volunteer performance from the Instructors regarding their strengths and weaknesses. If a pattern is seen regarding areas of training that need more attention a specific class will be held on that topic(i.e. horse handling, mounting and dismounting procedures). Volunteers sign a new application annually and take a background check every three years.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  7

Number of Board Members:  20  Number of Voting Board Members:  20

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member, and the name of the related organization. Board member owns a physical therapy clinic who rents our facility for their physical therapist to treat clients (aquatic therapy and hippotherapy).

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 17%

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Eagle Mount Bozeman is a Recreational Therapy Center whose mission since it's inception in 1982 is to transform the lives of people with disabilities and children with cancer. The Therapeutic Horsemanship Program serves over 180 individuals each year and offers therapeutic riding, life skill training (Barn Management and Horsemanship classes) and contracts out the facility for hippotherapy sessions and equine facilitated psychotherapy. Specialty classes include facilitated riding for participants with Multiple Sclerosis, Spinal Cord Injury and age related conditions and EMBLEM classes for military veterans (Eagle Mount Bozeman Lasting Experiences for our Military).

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. Other core programs include skiing (alpine and Nordic); swimming; horticulture and Big Sky Kids (oncology camps). Other smaller programs include Saturday Night Out (held once a month), EMBLEM camps (Eagle Mount Bozeman Lasting Experiences for our Military) and ice skating and snowshoeing.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     We are devoted to providing our therapy horses with excellent, preventative and comprehensive care so that they are ready, willing and able to provide our participants with the many benefits of Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT). The herd of 16 horses are schooled and exercised on a regular basis. To comply with PATH standards, their use during program is carefully assigned and monitored closely. Their feet are trimmed every five o six weeks, their teeth are checked/floated annually, and they also receive yearly vaccinations. The horses used in Special Olympics or other competitions are tested for EIA. They receive chiropractic treatments as necessary and are inspected daily for any lacerations or lameness. The program director holds her Masters of Science in Animal Science from the University of Connecticut and works closely with local veterinarians and the faculty at Montana State University to stay current on best practices regarding the feeding and proper care of equines.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     We do not accept any horses into the therapeutic horsemanship program unless they pass a fitness and suitability screening process which can last up to three months. The life of a therapy horse is physically and emotionally challenging so horses we accept must be sound both in body and spirit. Our preferred model is a long term lease versus a transfer of ownership/donation. This enables us to keep in touch with the horses owner and return the horse to them when the horse needs time off or needs to find a new job. Horses owned by Eagle Mount Bozeman who are retired go to wonderful homes and cannot be rehomed without our permission. We are proud to say they have forever homes with us or loving families for the duration of their lives.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Once a therapy horse is no longer physically or mentally able to do the job, they are placed with a forever home. Some are retired and live out their lives as a pasture buddies, others continue to be used as family/recreation horses. We maintain a list of individuals who have taken our horses in the past and the list is updated periodically with names of people who have expressed an interest in taking one of our retired horses. The staff visits the site and interviews the family to make sure they understand that the horse is not to be sold but will be returned to Eagle Mount if the family can no longer care for it. We maintain a close relationship with the local horse community and if one of our horses has had enough arena work or just needs a new job we can place them with an appropriate individual who can enjoy them outside the confines of the therapeutic ring. It is rewarding to see our horses at performing at local shows and to come across them on trail rides in the mountains with their new owners. They are the best ambassadors for us - we frequently receive inquiries about horses we have that are ready to retire. This is a result of the public seeing how well trained our horses are, as well as hearing from horse owners who have adopted one of our horses.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     The program director and assistant director initially go see the horse in their current home. If appropriate they will ride the horse on site to determine way of going, manners and suitability for the needs of our riders (e.g. base narrow, lateral or rotational movement). Health records are reviewed and a visual health assessment is made, if the staff is interested, the horse will be brought to Eagle Mount Bozeman for further assessment. If there are any lingering health concerns regarding the horse a veterinarian check will be ordered with the owners permission. The horses on trial are initially housed in a stall with an outside run so they can see the herd and become familiar with the sights and sounds of the facility. After one week on site they are introduced to the herd and if they fit in with the herd dynamic are turned out with the other horses. The herd shares four large paddocks and enjoys the freedom to pick and choose what groups they want to affiliate with. Once the horse has settled in the staff continues desensitizing the new horse with objects that are used in classes which includes wheelchairs, basketballs, rings, bubbles and most importantly carrying an unbalanced, loud rider with two side walkers and a horse leader present.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Horses are checked daily for lacerations, lameness and general health - attitude, running noses/weepy eyes. If there is a reason for concern the horse is treated immediately and closely monitored. Veterinarian care is requested if the injury or condition is beyond the scope of the staffs expertise or the condition worsens or does not respond to the treatment being provided (e.g. flushing out the eye with no sign of improvement). The horses receive annually a six way vaccination plus strangles and rabies injections. De-worming is done in the fall - we rotate the use of the active ingredients every year. Because we are so selective regarding the acceptance of a horse into our program we do not have at-risk animals in the herd. As our horses age, we provide them with joint supplements and frequently assess the amount and type of work they are required to perform. In the event they develop a "serious issue" such as laminitis or azoturia they will be removed from the working herd until they can be successfully treated.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     If a horse is suffering from an inoperable injury or disease that would prevent it from continuing as a therapy horse the decision to euthanize the animal is made by the Program Director in consultation with the veterinarian. Every possible means to help the horse regain it's strength and soundness will be made prior to making such a life ending decision. If the horse can be rehabilitated and placed in an appropriate forever home (limited or not used for riding as a result of their injury or illness)we will do so.

Horses are carefully screened for suitability in the program. Euthanizing one horse to make room for another would be out of the question. Montana has a one to three human/horse ratio, which is indicative of how many horse lovers there are in the state. This in turn, makes it easy for us to find good homes for our hard working equines.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     Not applicable

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Eagle Mount Bozeman

6901 Goldenstein Lane Bozeman MT 59715

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Maggee Harrison

2. Contact's Phone: 406-586-1781

3. Contact's Email: mharrison@eaglemount.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 11.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 14

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Horses are maintained in four one acre dry lot paddocks with round bale hay feeders, automatic waterers, run in shelters and scratching posts. The fencing used is vinyl covered aluminum wire strung between wooden posts. Each paddock can be closed off from one another but in general three of the four are shared by 12 horses and the fourth is used by four horses with specific metabolic issues that need a higher degree of nutrients. There are eight 12'X12' box stalls with runs and automatic waterers adjoining the indoor arena.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     The paddocks are dragged once a week during the summer and fall and less often during the winter and early spring due to the amount of snow on the ground. Fencing is checked daily and repaired as necessary. Shelters are raked out weekly and necessary repairs are made. Large soil berms are in three of the four pastures to give the horses dry areas to climb up on during the wettest parts of the year and to provide a wind break.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 24

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     The indoor and outdoor arenas are where the majority of the training takes place. We also utilize a large round pen for un-mounted schooling and ground work - weather permitting. The indoor arena has a synthetic footing which requires grooming and watering three times a week. The polyester product was chosen based on dust remediation and impact qualities. The outdoor arena and round pen footing is a natural fine/sand base which is harrowed once a week during heavy use and on an as needed basis during the winter and early spring months. This footing is maintained at a depth to give the horses the necessary support but not so deep as to cause injuries. The perimeter trail system is used during lessons and to exercise horses in an open area. The footing is a native grass mixture which is kept free from stones, weeds and trash.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Eagle Mount Bozeman has enjoyed and maintained the PATH International Premier Accredited Center status since 2004.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Our emergency evacuation of the horses is posted in the barn and referred to during our staff and volunteer training sessions. The list of trailers on site (8 horse capacity) and those individuals with trailers and their telephone numbers appear on the poster in order to accommodate 9 additional horses. This list is updated periodically or as needed.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Each horse has it's own bridle, halter and blankets - names are clearly marked on all tack. The daily lesson schedule includes the saddle and pads to be used so the volunteers know how to tack the horses up properly. The Therapeutic Horsemanship (TH) staff fits all saddles to the horses to assure comfort and balanced weight distribution on their backs. A professional saddle fitter visits upon request and makes recommendations on the saddles integrity and flocking.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     The halters are hung on hooks with the horses picture and name above the hook. There is a sign near the exit door indicating which paddock houses each of the horses.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     None of our horses are stall bound unless they are injured or ill. The horses being used in the morning are brought in from paddocks an hour before their lesson. If they are not being used after the lesson they are returned to the paddocks. If they are being used again that day they are put in a stall/run.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     The horses condition is closely monitored for weight/muscle gain &/or loss as well as coat condition and attitude. We work closely with an equine nutritionist and our veterinarians regarding the nutritional needs of the herd. The horses have free choice hay, minerals, salt and water. The horses who need additional supplements or graining are listed in the feed room. The staff is responsible for making sure this plan is adhered to.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     As mentioned above the horses are monitored closely for body conditioning. The Program Director holds a MS in Animal Science and works closely with the staff, veterinarians and nutritionist to make sure the horses maintain a healthy weight, muscle tone and mental attitude. The exercise schedule and frequency of use for each horse is reflected in any changes to diet that might need to be made in order for the horse to maintain an optimum body condition score.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Our herd health and facility management programs focus on prevention of illness and injury to equines and humans. Equines who we suspect to be ill are isolated from the herd until the veterinarian examines them and clears them to be reintroduced to the herd. All horses are vaccinated annually with a six way vaccine (which includes West Nile), strangles and rabies. The Program Director receives email alerts regarding health issues from the Montana Department of Livestock. The veterinarian team is consulted regularly with any questions regarding equine health issues that appear in the State. The horses who travel out of county lines must have a current Coggin's test for EIA on file and all horses visiting the facility must show proof of vaccination and a negative Coggin's before they are off loaded. Manure is taken off site on a weekly basis when weather permits and Spaulding Fly Predators are used on the grounds from May through the first killing frost which usually occurs in late September. A local crematorium is used in the event an animal carcass needs to be disposed of. If the horse is to be euthanized the veterinarian or the Program Director calls this company (Home on the Range) so they can be on call to collect the carcass soon after the horse is put down.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     PATH International dictates much of the safety standards that are set in place at our facility. They include the annual inspection and placement of fire extinguishers, emergency phone procedures and evacuation plans for both humans and horses. The Therapeutic Horsemanship Policy and Procedure manual is a comprehensive document which addresses our emergency preparedness plans. The evacuation of the facility is illustrated in the barn and all personnel knows what to do in the event of a fire, tornado, wind or hail storm to name a few. This procedure is reviewed several times a year. As mentioned above a list of individuals with trailers is kept in plain site so they can be called and the horses can be evacuated from site as soon as possible. If there is not time to transport them and human life is at risk the centers name and telephone number are to be spray painted or marked on the horses and the horses are to be released from all enclosures that may hamper their escape from potential harm (i.e. fire, tornado, earthquake).

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The barn and arena are equipped with security night lights. All outside off limit areas are clearly posted with "Do Not Enter" signs and "Do not feed the horses" signs. Eagle Mount Bozeman is a very active campus and the aquatics center often holds swimming classes into the evening and any suspicious activity is noted and addressed. The barn and viewing room are locked each night after the final class. Personnel only signs are affixed to all areas that the public/participants are not allowed.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Gallatin County Animal Control Kathy Middleton 406-582-2116 Law and Justice Center Sherriff's Office 615 S 16th Bozeman, MT 59715

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     None.


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/02/2017

Veterinarian: Gary Cook, DVM

Clinic Name: All West Veterinary Hospital    Street: 105 All West Trail    City: Bozeman  State: MT    Zip: 59718

Phone: 406-586-4919    Email: allwestvet@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Aly Feddes

     2. Instructor: Betsy deLeiris

     3. Instructor: Claire Brunner

     4. Instructor: Dana Eklund

     5. Instructor: Karna Johnson

     6. Instructor: Katie Jacobson

     7. Instructor: Laura Heck

     8. Instructor: Maggee Harrison

     9. Instructor: Megan MacNichol

     10. Instructor: Pattie Draude

     11. Instructor: Sandy Kypfer


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 16.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 19

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 20

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:The numbers below reflect the following donations: 100 tons of grass hay delivered: $20000 CHS Nutritionals donates approximately $6000 in feed and minerals. Annual vaccines and de-worming paste: $1700 Actual costs for feed was $2500. Actual costs for medications/supplements $0 Note: The annual dental exams and floating are included in Veterinarian costs - approximately $800; Coggins testing is also included in this number - approximately $150

16 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 3 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

19 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

0 = Total of 2d-2f

19 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            19 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$22500     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$200     Bedding.

$2000     Veterinarian.

$2500     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$7700     Medications & Supplements.

$0     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$34900     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$27700     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

6935     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $5
Question 3 ($34,900 ) divided by Question 4 (6935).

Average length of stay for an equine: 365 days
Question 4 (6935) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (19).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 140

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 50

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 52

4. What is the average wait list time? 1 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 1.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 2

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 80%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Aly Feddes

         *Facility Participation:

         Eagle Mount Bozeman

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Certified Riding Instructor Registered level


     2. *Instructor: Betsy deLeiris

         *Facility Participation:

         Eagle Mount Bozeman

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Certified Riding Instructor Registered Level

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Special Olympics

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Special Olympic Equestrian Coach Level 2


     3. *Instructor: Claire Brunner

         *Facility Participation:

         Eagle Mount Bozeman

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Certified Riding Instructor Registered Level


     4. *Instructor: Dana Eklund

         *Facility Participation:

         Eagle Mount Bozeman

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Therapeutic Riding Instructor.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Special Olympics

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equestrian Sport Coach Level II

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Dana was a presenter at the 2012 PATH International Conference held in Bellevue, WA along with Karen Ososki. She and Karen continue to work to improve our therapy horses biomechanics through a series of specific ground exercises. As a result of this hands-on approach, our horses show a greater ability to release tension during our mounted lessons and remain more physically and mentally prepared to do the job we ask of them. She shares these techniques with our volunteer horse leaders so that they can better support the horses during the lessons.


     5. *Instructor: Karna Johnson

         *Facility Participation:

         Eagle Mount Bozeman

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2005

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Therapeutic Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.American Hippotherapy Association

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2003

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapist in Hippotherapy

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Karna is a physical therapist who provides hippotherapy services to her patients at our facility.


     6. *Instructor: Katie Jacobson

         *Facility Participation:

         Eagle Mount Bozeman

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Certified Riding Instructor at the Registered level

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Spcial Olympics

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Special Olympic Equestrian Sport Coach Level 1


     7. *Instructor: Laura Heck

         *Facility Participation:

         Eagle Mount Bozeman

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Internationall

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Therapeutic Riding Instructor.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.American Hippotherapy Associtation

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2008

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Level I Therapist

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Laura is an OT who works for a clinic that rents our facility to provide her patients with hippotherapy.


     8. *Instructor: Maggee Harrison

         *Facility Participation:

         Eagle Mount Bozeman

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2007

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Therapeutic Riding Instructor.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Special Olympics

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2007

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equestrian Sport Coach Level II

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Therapeutic Horsemanship Program Director 2009 - Present PATH State Chair PATH Mentor PATH Center Representative


     9. *Instructor: Megan MacNichol

         *Facility Participation:

         Eagle Mount Bozeman

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Therapeutic Riding Instructor

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Megan suffered a TBI her freshman year at Montana State University ten years ago. As a result of her injury, she not only has titanium rods in most of her long bones but she has no short term memory. She received her PATH Instructor Training at High Hopes, Old Lyme, Connecticut. The staff went above and beyond what is required to help Megan develop systems that allow her to be the instructor and role model for her participants that she is today. Eagle Mount continues to provide Megan with the same support that she received at High Hopes so she can continue to learn and grow in her profession.


     10. *Instructor: Pattie Draude

         *Facility Participation:

         Eagle Mount Bozeman

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Certified Riding Instructor Registered Level


     11. *Instructor: Sandy Kypfer

         *Facility Participation:

         Eagle Mount Bozeman

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Therapeutic Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Special Olympics

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equestrian Sport Coach Level II