×
LEARN MORE ABOUT US HERE
Our Work About Us Grants How to Apply Recipients Photo Credits
Equine Welfare Network Sign Up Here Equine Charity Network Alliance Guardians Champions Equine Education Network

Awards Equine Award Horse Stars Hall of Fame Humanitarian Award Klinger Award Research Fellowship
Get Involved Make a Donation #RideForHorses Join Here Winners Circle Best Performance Who's In! Attend an Event Establish a Horse Whisperers Fund

EQUUStars Partners News Contact Us Login Individual Organization

America's Horses
Need Our Protection!



SIRE, Houston's Therapeutic Equestrian Centers

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/25/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Joe Wappelhorst

Employees:   Full-Time:  12  Part-Time:  9  Volunteers:  350

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Volunteers have 8 hours of orientation and training and are provided a volunteer handbook. Likewise, new hires have orientation and an employee handbook. All positions have job descriptions approved by our board. Our human resource-related guidance documents, policies and procedures are available to all employees on our server. Employee evaluations are conducted at the completion of the employee’s probationary period and at least annually thereafter. In addition, SIRE meets or exceeds all standards established by PATH International regarding employees and volunteers.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  8

Number of Board Members:  12  Number of Voting Board Members:  11

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     SIRE primarily provides therapeutic riding to nearly 250 clients with special needs per week. We serve ages three and older, with the most common diagnosis being autism spectrum disorders. In addition, we have programs tailored for schools, ground lessons, and our Horses for Armed Forces program. Finally, SIRE has an extensive education and training program for volunteers and aspiring therapeutic horsemanship professionals.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 3

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. We do not have any non-horse-related programs.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Humane Treatment of Horses Policy
taken from SIRE's Equine Policies and Procedures document
SIRE supports adherence to humane treatment of horses and is committed to:
· Upholding the welfare of horses as a primary consideration in all activities.
· Advocating and practicing standards of care that allow horses freedom from physical or psychological distress in all life stages
· Identifying and maintaining those standards which assure the beneficial aspects of the human-animal bond.
· Practicing and encouraging others to use responsible care in the handling, treatment and transportation of our own horses as well as horses owned and placed in our care for any purpose.
· Practicing and encouraging routine inspection and consultation with equine health care professionals to achieve the highest possible standards of nutrition, health, comfort, shelter and sanitation.
· Increasing education on the management and role of the horse in equine facilitated activities.
· Developing and raising standards for equine-facilitated activities for individuals with disabilities that protect the welfare of the horse.
· Respecting the dignity of horses by assuring that no SIRE owned horse will ever be sold at auction and any SIRE owned horse that has died by any means will either be buried on SIRE property, or the property of a friend of SIRE, or they may be cremated.
Approved - Board of Directors Nov 2008

We follow PATH International rules and guidelines and have still more written policies and procedures regarding ongoing training, schooling and exercising. We have an acquisition policy as detailed below and are well below the carrying capacity of our facilities. The number of horses in the program is determined by demand for services but is ultimately controlled by the budget set by the board. We will not accept horses beyond our ability to care for them.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Most of our horses have been acquired (either as donation or free lease) from private owners. A small percentage have been purchased.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     When horses are no longer appropriate for the program due to soundness, temperament, health issues, one of the following apply:
1) Returned to original donor or owner (if leased).
2) Adoption to an appropriate home.
3) Euthanized, if in the best interest of the horse.
Horses are occasionally sent out for a break/ R&R/ Rehabilitation Training.
The Offer of Home for Retired SIRE Horse Form may be used to gather information on people who are willing to take retired horses. The form includes the Guidelines for Care of SIRE Horses. Potential homes are evaluated on-site using these guidelines. Potential adopters generally are recruited by word of mouth or through our e-newsletter to SIRE volunteers and supporters.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Evaluation of New Horses Procedure
taken from SIRE's Equine Policies and Procedures document
Initial information on prospective horses is recorded on the Initial Horse Report Form.
All prospective SIRE horses must be evaluated by the Equine Coordinator or an approved SIRE evaluator, either at their home or at a SIRE facility, before they can be considered for the SIRE program. Evaluations will have written documentation using the Initial Horse Evaluation Form.
The Equine Coordinator or evaluator will consult with the site directors and the head instructors to determine if there is a place at any of the facilities for the prospective horse.
If there is a place for the horse, he/she will be accepted for a 90 day probation period at one of the SIRE facilities. A detailed free lease agreement will be signed that includes release of liability for the donor and outlines the procedure for handling medical expenses. Details of the intake process are described further SIRE's Equine Policies and Procedures document.
During the probation period, the horse will receive further testing and training. ... Other paperwork that must come with the horse is a current Coggins, information on shots, farrier,etc, feed.

We typically have a vet consult before acceptance as well. Coggins are required and new horses are kept separate from the herd until acceptance, then integrated gradually.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Health care at SIRE is very much hands-on. Our horses are observed daily for soundness, health of coat and hoof, expression and response to workload. Coggins, vaccinations and dentals are done annually; Health Certificates are provided when needed for shows, etc.; worming is done three times a year. For all other issues, the horses are treated as individuals. Because several are older, they need a maintenance program for arthritic joints, allergies, dietary, maximum weight and workload adjustments. Chiropractic service is provided as needed.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Â· Respecting the dignity of horses by assuring that no SIRE owned horse will ever be sold at auction and any SIRE owned horse that has died by any means will either be buried on SIRE property, or the property of a friend of SIRE, or they may be cremated.
Approved - Board of Directors Nov 2008

With veterinary guidance, the program will consider euthanasia when all other options have been eliminated and it is in the best interest of the horse. When health issues have been determined as terminal and the horse is showing signs that he is ready, that decision may be made. Under no circumstances would an animal be euthanized to make space or because they are difficult to handle. Other options are available to us.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     No stallions or pregnant mares are accepted into the program or are allowed on site (in the case of stallions).

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 3

.

Location 1 of 3
SIRE Hockley

24161 Spring Dr. Hockley TX 77447

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: PJ Murray

2. Contact's Phone: 281-356-7588

3. Contact's Email: pjmurray@sire-htec.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 7.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 20

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. One 16 acre pasture; several 1 acre or smaller pastures. One 25 stall barn. No climb wire fencing and electric fencing. 2 run in sheds.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     All horses herded together (generally mares with mares and geldings with geldings), unless there is a reason for separation. Pastures rotated to allow for fresh growth.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 24

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Sand indoor arena dragged and watered daily and sand and grass outdoor arenas. Footing is evaluated daily with safety considerations addressed immediately.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     PATH International Premier accredited center. For details, see http://www.pathintl.org/path-intl-centers/path-intl-center-accreditation.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Three horse trailers available

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Each horse assessed for tack fit individual in compliance with PATH Intl Standards.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Facility diagram posted with horses' names and location. Volunteer training and mentoring includes orientation to location of pastures and barn along with horse identification.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     N/A

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Free choice hay and pasture, supplemented with beet pulp, alfalfa pellets and flax seed fed twice a day. Supplement program designed individually by equine nutritionist.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The Henneke body score system is used informally.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     All horses entering the facility are required to have a current health certificate and negative Coggins test. Manure is removed from the stalls twice a day. Pastures are dragged twice a week. Fly traps and fly spray are utilized for fly control.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     SIRE developed and uses an emergency manual covering procedures for local fires, power loss, tornadoes, floods, hurricanes, and wildfires. We have implemented risk management plans for 1) Natural Hazards - Lightning, heat, rain, street flooding, mosquitos (Spring), deer (Spring), poisonous snakes, venomous spiders, fire ants, wasps, prickly grass (Hockley), and poison ivy (Spring; 2) Man-made Hazards - Electric Fences, Stray Animals, Public Roads; 3) Operation of Facilities and Equipment - Deliveries, Power Outage, Water Outage, Overhead Lift, Tractors, Vehicles; 4) Natural Disasters - Local Fire, Power Loss, Flooding, Wildfire, Tornado, Hurricane; 5) Hazards Specific to the use of Equines 6) Conduct of Personnel, Participants, and Guests - Smoking, Abuse of Animals, Drugs, Alcohol and Control of Firearms- Rider’s Fall from a Horse, Loose Horse, Kicking and Biting; etc. Volunteers are trained in emergency procedures and we have drills every semester.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The entire property is fenced and gated and fences are checked daily. Two live-in faculty caretakers are present.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Montgomery County Animal Control Authority 8535 Hwy 242 Conroe, Texas 77385 Phone 936-442-7738 http://www.mctx.org/dept/departments_a-b/animal_control/

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     PATH International PO Box 33150, Denver, CO 80233-0150 800-369-7433 pathintl@pathintl.org


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/12/2017

Veterinarian: Jenni Schroeder DVM, DVSc

Clinic Name: Waller Equine Hospital    Street: 28234 FM 2920    City: Waller  State: TX    Zip: 77484

Phone: 936-931-2900    Email: info@wallerequine.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Anthony Busacca

     2. Instructor: Joelle Devlin

     3. Instructor: Joetta Adkins

     4. Instructor: Karen Somma

     5. Instructor: Kimberley McDonell

     6. Instructor: P.J. Murray

     7. Instructor: Paige McDonough


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 11.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 12

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 25

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

13 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 2 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

15 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 2 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 1 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

3 = Total of 2d-2f

12 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            12 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$14554     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$1050     Bedding.

$7848     Veterinarian.

$7265     Farrier.

$2000     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$3563     Medications & Supplements.

$1751     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$44455     Horse Care Staff.

$10000     Horse Training.

$2447     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$94933     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

4380     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $22
Question 3 ($94,933 ) divided by Question 4 (4380).

Average length of stay for an equine: 292 days
Question 4 (4380) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (15).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 94

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 50

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 35

4. What is the average wait list time? 3 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 2.00  Un-Mounted: 0.00  Total: 2

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 90%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.



Location 2 of 3
SIRE Fort Bend

2100 Preston Street Richmond TX 77469

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Toni Conner

2. Contact's Phone: 281-344-4308

3. Contact's Email: tmcconway@sire-htec.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: facility owned by
Department of Aging and Disability Services
State of Texas
P.O. Box 149030
Austin, Texas 78714-9030

We provide services at the Richmond State Supported Living Center. The contact there is noted below.
Robin Eversole
Acting Director of Volunteer Services
Richmond State Supported Living Center
2100 Preston St, Richmond, TX 77469
281/344-4525
robin.eversole@dads.state.tx.us

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Current agreement will last 2 years September 1, 2015 through August 31, 2017 We expect continuing to have a presence in Fort Bend county will be consistent with our strategic plan. If so, we will endeavor to renew the agreement.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     The Department of Aging and Disability Services feeds and waters the horses, cleans facility, and assists with supervision of Richmond State Supported Living Center riders, etc. In return for the use and maintenance of the facility, SIRE provides services at no additional charge to qualified Richmond State Supported Living Center residents.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 3.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 20

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. 2 pastures of 5 acres each; 1 paddock at 3 acres all with wood plank fencing. We have an outdoor arena of 60 X 100 that we sometimes use for turn out for a new horse. All paddocks and pastures have water supply. The larger pastures have run-in sheds; the smaller have shade trees for shelter. A 12 stall barn and a 100 X 200 covered arena sometimes used for turn out in extreme weather.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Horses are grouped for compatibility and to keep the pastures viable..

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 24

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     The sand indoor arena and sand and grass outdoor arena are inspected daily. Safety and footing issues are addressed immediately.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     SIRE is a PATH International Premier Accredited Center.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     At Fort Bend, we have a 2-horse trailer and a list of volunteers who have agreed to be on call to utilize their trucks and/or trailers to assist in case of emergency. We have a truck also.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Saddle fitting is done at least annually. Instructors are responsible for ensuring that all tack used in their classes is in good repair. If not, they are to notify the Site Director that repair is needed. Need for and fitting of blankets, etc., is determined by the Equine Manager.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Photos and descriptions/characteristics of each horse are posted in the sign-in cottage. Names are posted on each stall. Name tags on each halter.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Horses are kept in a stall only for injury or illness. When this occurs, the stall is cleaned daily, stripped as needed; the horse hand walked if needed, if included in the protocol from the vet. The horses are turned out whenever possible.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Our feed includes Equine One, Equine Senior, One & Only, and beet pulp/rice bran. Supplements are added on an individual basis for hoof care, joint maintenance, to aid digestion. Coastal hay as needed to supplement pastures.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Admittedly, we use it informally, but we do use a daily visual scan of the horses' fat ratio to determine feed, workload and exercise regimen

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Because our facility is owned by Richmond State Supported Living Center, they assume responsibility for manure management and disposal as well as parasite control. Carcass disposal is handled by an outside service.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     SIRE developed and uses an emergency manual covering procedures for local fires, power loss, tornadoes, floods, hurricanes, and wildfires. We have implemented risk management plans for 1) Natural Hazards - Lightning, heat, rain, street flooding, mosquitos (Spring), deer (Spring), poisonous snakes, venomous spiders, fire ants, wasps, prickly grass (Hockley), and poison ivy (Spring; 2) Man-made Hazards - Electric Fences, Stray Animals, Public Roads; 3) Operation of Facilities and Equipment - Deliveries, Power Outage, Water Outage, Overhead Lift, Tractors, Vehicles; 4) Natural Disasters - Local Fire, Power Loss, Flooding, Wildfire, Tornado, Hurricane; 5) Hazards Specific to the use of Equines 6) Conduct of Personnel, Participants, and Guests - Smoking, Abuse of Animals, Drugs, Alcohol and Control of Firearms- Rider’s Fall from a Horse, Loose Horse, Kicking and Biting; etc. Volunteers are trained in emergency procedures and we have drills every semester.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     Since we are located on the campus of a State-run facility, security is at the maximum. There is a manned gatehouse at the entrance and security personnel who monitor the campus 24/7. Off-limits areas are clearly posted.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Fort Bend County Animal Control 1210 Blume Rd, Rosenberg, TX 77471 (281) 342-1512

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     PATH International PO Box 33150, Denver, CO 80233-0150 800-369-7433 pathintl@pathintl.org


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/18/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. E.W. Hildreth

Clinic Name: TERF Center    Street: 8925 FM 359 Rd    City: Richmond  State: TX    Zip: 77406

Phone: 281-342-7553    Email: EWHildreth@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Bethany Jensen

     2. Instructor: Helen Evans

     3. Instructor: Toni Conner


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 13.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 14

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 15

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

14 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 3 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

17 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 2 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 1 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

3 = Total of 2d-2f

14 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            14 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$13051     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$3294     Bedding.

$10323     Veterinarian.

$8425     Farrier.

$2000     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$3481     Medications & Supplements.

$2918     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$6000     Horse Care Staff.

$7230     Horse Training.

$277     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$56999     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

5110     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $11
Question 3 ($56,999 ) divided by Question 4 (5110).

Average length of stay for an equine: 301 days
Question 4 (5110) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (17).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 85

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 42

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 35

4. What is the average wait list time? 2 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 2.00  Un-Mounted: 0.00  Total: 2

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 90%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.



Location 3 of 3
SIRE - Spring

4610 Sloangate Spring TX 77373

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Shayna Bolton

2. Contact's Phone: 281-353-6160

3. Contact's Email: shayna@sire-htec.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 4.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 20

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. 1 10 acre pasture, 1 3 acre pasture, rest is smaller pastures/paddocks

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Our horses are not separated and pastures are rotated

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 24

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Sand indoor arenas and sand and grass outdoor arenas are monitored daily, with safety issues addressed immediately.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     PATH International

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     This facility has two 2 horse trailers and a truck for emergency transportation

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Procedures in place according to a written plan

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     We label all bridle and halters with the horses names. All grooming buckets have names and pictures so horses can be identified.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     N/A No barn at this site

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Horses are given grain 2 times per day. We feed Nutrana feeds and for our older horses

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     N/A we do not use this

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Our horses are kept in pasture. No barn at this site. If a need arises for quarantine we use temporary panels to put up a pen and the sick horse is kept from the rest of the herd. Horses from the Spring herd that need stall rest are transported to our Hockley facility. Manure is spread on property regularly.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     SIRE developed and uses an emergency manual covering procedures for local fires, power loss, tornadoes, floods, hurricanes, and wildfires. We have implemented risk management plans for 1) Natural Hazards - Lightning, heat, rain, street flooding, mosquitos (Spring), deer (Spring), poisonous snakes, venomous spiders, fire ants, wasps, prickly grass (Hockley), and poison ivy (Spring; 2) Man-made Hazards - Electric Fences, Stray Animals, Public Roads; 3) Operation of Facilities and Equipment - Deliveries, Power Outage, Water Outage, Overhead Lift, Tractors, Vehicles; 4) Natural Disasters - Local Fire, Power Loss, Flooding, Wildfire, Tornado, Hurricane; 5) Hazards Specific to the use of Equines 6) Conduct of Personnel, Participants, and Guests - Smoking, Abuse of Animals, Drugs, Alcohol and Control of Firearms- Rider’s Fall from a Horse, Loose Horse, Kicking and Biting; etc. Volunteers are trained in emergency procedures and we have drills every semester.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     There is a facility supervisor that lives on property. We also have front entry gates that are closed and locked at night.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     According to Harris County Public Health and Environmental Services, abuse can be reported either to Houston Humane Society (713) 433-6421 ext. 396 http://www.houstonhumane.org/report-cruelty or Houston Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (713) 869-7722 http://www.houstonspca.org/site/PageNavigator/cruelty_and_rescue_animal_cruelty_laws

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     PATH International PO Box 33150, Denver, CO 80233-0150 800-369-7433 pathintl@pathintl.org


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/12/2017

Veterinarian: Jenni Schroeder

Clinic Name: Waller Equine Hospital    Street: 28234 Fm 2920 Rd    City: Waller  State: TX    Zip: 77484

Phone: 936-931-2900    Email: info@wallerequine.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Ali Wheelwright

     2. Instructor: Joelle Devlin

     3. Instructor: Kathy Bigelow

     4. Instructor: Shayna Bolton


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 11.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 12

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 25

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

11 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 2 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

13 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 1 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

1 = Total of 2d-2f

12 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            12 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$14285     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$4246     Veterinarian.

$2255     Farrier.

$1000     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$2483     Medications & Supplements.

$993     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$34956     Horse Care Staff.

$10000     Horse Training.

$1282     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$71500     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

4380     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $16
Question 3 ($71,500 ) divided by Question 4 (4380).

Average length of stay for an equine: 337 days
Question 4 (4380) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (13).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? No

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 65

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 25

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 35

4. What is the average wait list time? 8 Weeks(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 2.00  Un-Mounted: 0.00  Total: 2

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 90%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Ali Wheelwright

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE - Spring

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.certified


     2. *Instructor: Anthony Busacca

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE Hockley

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1991

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Anthony is a Master Instructor. Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) offers three levels of certification for therapeutic riding instructors: Registered, Advanced and Master. PATH Intl. also offers instructor certification in the specialty disciplines of driving and interactive vaulting. Driving instructors may become certified as Level I, Level II or Level III. Those teaching vaulting also have the opportunity to obtain vaulting instructor certification, and PATH Intl. Registered Level instructor certification is a prerequisite for this particular discipline.


     3. *Instructor: Bethany Jensen

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE Fort Bend

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Instructor in Training


     4. *Instructor: Helen Evans

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE Fort Bend

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered level


     5. *Instructor: Joelle Devlin

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE Hockley

         SIRE - Spring

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1994

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Joelle is certified as a Master Instructor. Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) offers three levels of certification for therapeutic riding instructors: Registered, Advanced and Master. PATH Intl. also offers instructor certification in the specialty disciplines of driving and interactive vaulting. Driving instructors may become certified as Level I, Level II or Level III. Those teaching vaulting also have the opportunity to obtain vaulting instructor certification, and PATH Intl. Registered Level instructor certification is a prerequisite for this particular discipline.


     6. *Instructor: Joetta Adkins

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE Hockley

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Path

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.certified therapeutic riding instructor


     7. *Instructor: Karen Somma

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE Hockley

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) offers three levels of certification for therapeutic riding instructors: Registered, Advanced and Master. PATH Intl. also offers instructor certification in the specialty disciplines of driving and interactive vaulting. Driving instructors may become certified as Level I, Level II or Level III. Those teaching vaulting also have the opportunity to obtain vaulting instructor certification, and PATH Intl. Registered Level instructor certification is a prerequisite for this particular discipline.


     8. *Instructor: Kathy Bigelow

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE - Spring

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered level


     9. *Instructor: Kimberley McDonell

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE Hockley

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2013

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.certified


     10. *Instructor: P.J. Murray

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE Hockley

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) offers three levels of certification for therapeutic riding instructors: Registered, Advanced and Master. PATH Intl. also offers instructor certification in the specialty disciplines of driving and interactive vaulting. Driving instructors may become certified as Level I, Level II or Level III. Those teaching vaulting also have the opportunity to obtain vaulting instructor certification, and PATH Intl. Registered Level instructor certification is a prerequisite for this particular discipline. Therapeutic riding instructors who teach at PATH Intl. Centers are required to achieve one level of PATH Intl. Instructor Certification status. Instructors apply for each level of certification separately, beginning with the Registered level. More at http://www.pathintl.org/resources-education/certifications


     11. *Instructor: Paige McDonough

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE Hockley

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.certified


     12. *Instructor: Shayna Bolton

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE - Spring

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2001

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) offers three levels of certification for therapeutic riding instructors: Registered, Advanced and Master. PATH Intl. also offers instructor certification in the specialty disciplines of driving and interactive vaulting. Driving instructors may become certified as Level I, Level II or Level III. Those teaching vaulting also have the opportunity to obtain vaulting instructor certification, and PATH Intl. Registered Level instructor certification is a prerequisite for this particular discipline.


     13. *Instructor: Toni Conner

         *Facility Participation:

         SIRE Fort Bend

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) offers three levels of certification for therapeutic riding instructors: Registered, Advanced and Master. PATH Intl. also offers instructor certification in the specialty disciplines of driving and interactive vaulting. Driving instructors may become certified as Level I, Level II or Level III. Those teaching vaulting also have the opportunity to obtain vaulting instructor certification, and PATH Intl. Registered Level instructor certification is a prerequisite for this particular discipline. Therapeutic riding instructors who teach at PATH Intl. Centers are required to achieve one level of PATH Intl. Instructor Certification status. Instructors apply for each level of certification separately, beginning with the Registered level. More at http://www.pathintl.org/resources-education/certifications