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Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 07/08/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Carol Heiden

Employees:   Full-Time:  6  Part-Time:  7  Volunteers:  1000

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Volunteers complete an application and then an interview with the Volunteer Coordinator. All volunteers must complete an initial orientation. CTRC also provides ongoing training opportunities for volunteers. All volunteer positions have job descriptions.

Staff receive initial training and orientation by our Director of Operations. They are also required to attend the volunteer orientation and training. They are also required to receive a minimum of 10 hours of continuing education per year. All staff positions have a job description. New employees are reviewed through a formal review process at 3 months, 6 months and then 1 year. All employees receive annual evaluations there after. All volunteers and employees must complete a background screening before start of volunteering or employment.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  11

Number of Board Members:  7  Number of Voting Board Members:  7

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     CTRC serves our special needs community through four program areas: Therapeutic Riding, Hippotherapy, Mini Troopers and our Retired Horse Sanctuary.Therapeutic Riding is the core of the program. Certified instructors, with trained volunteers, assist riders to achieve therapeutic and other life goals, acquire horsemanship skills, and establish a special bond with their horses. Hippotherapy ("treatment with the help of a horse") is conducted by licensed therapists who use the horse to achieve improved client functioning and rehabilitation, utilizing the three dimensional movement of the horse. Mini Troopers achieves the goal of community outreach and education through a miniature horse outreach team who brings the benefits of animal assisted activities (AAA) to special needs populations who are unable to access traditional services on-site. Retired Horse Sanctuary provides for our noble "Equine Therapists" who have come to the end of their career and who because of age, restricted ability, medical issues or special care concerns are not able to be adopted.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. CTRC has no non-horse related programs.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Commitment to the Horse - At CTRC our horses are the heart of our therapeutic program. They do not only provide the therapeutic movement that is critical to our participants clinical progress, they provide the unconditional acceptance and bond with our participants that often becomes the motivating catalyst for every area of our participants lives. Our horses provide a priceless and difficult service; consequently, we are fully and deeply committed to providing them with the optimum of care and treating them with dignity and respect in all phases of their lives. For 37 years, CTRC has served as an option for horses that no longer fit the needs of their owners. CTRC is one of the largest therapeutic riding centers in the nation, annually serving nearly 1,200 special needs individuals each year through all our Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT) programs. In order to provide this level of service CTRC must maintain a herd of 26 to 30 active, therapy horses. All of our horses are donated to us, typically after they are unable to continue in their primary career due to age, health constraints, their owners loss or change in interest or their owners inability to provide care. CTRC has a long tradition of providing the highest standard of care for our herd of "Equine Therapists". CTRC works closely with our veterinarian, Dr. Mark Fitch, who has been volunteering his services to our organization for 37 years. With Dr. Fitch's guidance we have established, implemented and maintained excellent horse health management practices. Our entire horse health regime has grown from Dr. Fitch's observations of, and recommendations for, humanely building and maintaining the most optimal and effective therapy herd possible.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     All horses for the therapeutic riding and hippotherapy programs are acquired through donation from our community members. Horses in the Retired Horse Sanctuary are all horses that have been retired from our therapeutic riding or hippotherapy programs.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     For 37 years, CTRC has served as an option for horses that no longer fit the needs of their owners. CTRC is one of the largest therapeutic riding centers in the nation, annually serving over 500 individuals through equine assisted activities. In order to provide this level of service CTRC must maintain a herd of 26 to 30 active, therapy horses. All of our horses are donated to us, typically after they are unable to continue in their primary career due to age, health constraints, their owners loss or change in interest or their owners inability to provide care. CTRC has a long tradition of providing the highest standard of care for our herd of "Equine Therapists". Sadly, no matter how great the care - nor how willing the horse - it is inevitable that "Retirement Day" eventually arrives even for therapy horses.

CTRC has developed, and continually refines, guidelines, standards and practices for the placement of our retired horses. When a horse becomes ready for retirement the original owner has the right of first refusal. If they waive that right, CTRC diligently reviews, evaluates and selects an adoptive home. Potential "adoptees" must submit an Adoption Application. If, upon reviewing the application it seems appropriate, the CTRC Barn Manager will interview the potential "adoptee". The Barn Manager will then visit the home/facility where the "adoptee" intends to care for the horse. The Barn Manager will also contact the "adoptee" veterinarian and farrier for input. If, after all of that, the "adoptee" and the horse seem like a good match then the "adoptee" must complete an Adoption Contract and the horse will be formally adopted. For 30 years, these practices were highly satisfactory and successful. We were always able to secure excellent homes for our horses, and have effectively placed nearly 300 horses. Unfortunately, with the disheartening changes in the horse community we have come to realize that the practice of routinely adopting out our retired horses is no longer viable. With "Commitment to the Horse" as one of our core values, euthanasia was never an option. After much research and careful deliberation, in 2011 we decided to open a Retired Horse Sanctuary open to all horses who cannot be adopted out.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     When a horse is being considered for the either the therapeutic riding or hippotherapy program it is first evaluated in its own setting both on the ground and under saddle. If the horse is sound and seems to have the mental, physical and psychological attributes necessary to succeed as a therapy horse then the horse will come to our center for a 90 day trial period. Coggins and health records are required before arrival. Our veterinarian performs an evaluation upon the horses arrival and then again prior to acceptance into the program.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     CTRC works closely with our veterinarian, Dr. Mark Fitch, who has been volunteering his services to our organization for 37 years. With Dr. Fitch's guidance we have established, implemented and maintained excellent horse health management practices. Our entire horse health regime has grown from Dr. Fitch's observations of, and recommendations for, humanely building and maintaining the most optimal and effective therapy herd possible. When we retire a horse and, due to a multitude of factors, that horse is deemed "unadoptable", but with proper care is still able to live a comfortable life, CTRC commits to retiring that horse to our Retired Horse Sanctuary. These horses live out their lives in a safe, comfortable and familiar environment, surrounded by individuals who are dedicated to their care and well being. Again, as we do with our therapeutic riding program, we have developed best practices based on the feedback of our veterinarian and upon AVMA recommendations for care of the geriatric horse.

Our staff routinely works closely with our veterinarian around health issues for our herd. Our horses are on a schedule of routine health care including immunization, deworming and dental care. Our staff is trained and experienced in horse management and is highly cognizant of, and sensitive to, equine disease and lameness common in horses - with special knowledge of geriatric horses. All horses are formally observed by staff several times a day. Our staff is fully able to identify early signs of disease, distress and injury and is deeply dedicated to providing for the special needs of our geriatric horses. Practices and policies have been established and implemented for all areas of health management and when serious problems arise our staff is highly trained to recognize and promptly address these problems while awaiting the arrival of a veterinarian.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     The decision to euthanize a horse is a very serious one. It is a decision that we make in conjunction with our vet and it is based on the need of the horse. If the horse is in significant pain and there is not a likelihood of ever being able to relive or rectify that pain then we will make the decision to euthanize. We will never euthanize a healthy horse just for the sake of convenience or space.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     CTRC does not breed horses.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     Yes

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     When a horse becomes ready for retirement the original owner has the right of first refusal. If they waive that right, CTRC diligently reviews, evaluates and selects either an adoptive or foster home. A potential foster must submit a Foster Application. If, upon reviewing the application it seems appropriate, the CTRC Barn Manager will interview the potential foster. The Barn Manager will then visit the home/facility where the foster intends to care for the horse. The Barn Manager will also contact the foster's veterinarian and farrier for input. If, after all of that, the foster and the horse seem like a good match then the foster must complete a Foster Contract and the horse will be formally fostered.

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Less than $200

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine health and soundness.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Other considerations are provided below.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: CTRC charges an adoption fee based on whether or not the horse is determined to be solely a companion ($50) or is able to be ridden. The adoption fee helps to offset the cost of site visits conducted to ensure appropriate care and a suitable environment. Additionally, the adoption fee funds an emergency horse care fund.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

11968 Mineral Road Longmont CO 80504

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Carol Heiden

2. Contact's Phone: 303-652-9131

3. Contact's Email: director@gmail.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 10.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 38

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Each horse has a covered shelter that offers relief from direct sunlight, wind, rain, snow and other inclement weather. Each shelter is a 12' x 12' stall with a 12' x 24' run and is equipped with an automatic waterer. The stalls and runs have soft footing and the stalls have shavings for bedding. Paddocks, runs and stalls are cleaned daily. Organic biological fly control products are used to eliminate flies in the stalls, runs, and paddocks and manure is removed from the property on a regularly scheduled basis. Additionally, there are 8 pastures on the property available for pasture turn out, all with a constant source of water. Fencing is three strand smooth wire with one strand of Electrobraid.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     We use pasture rotation, providing full rest for two pastures at a time. We flood irrigate our pastures, fertilize in the spring and fall and spread composted manure. Retired horse have turn out every day. Therapy program horses have turnout every day except Saturday.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 6

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     CTRC has one indoor arena 100x200 and two out door arenas - 100x200 and 100x100. The footing in all of our arenas is sand. The arenas are watered and groomed at least 3xs per week.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     CTRC is a Premiere Accredited Center by PATH International. Our Retired Horse Sanctuary as Accredited through the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     We have 2 horse trailers and two trucks on our facility. Additionally, we have 6 volunteers within a few minutes of our facility who are "on call" for emergency evacuation.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Instructors are responsible for checking tack upon every use. Our Barn Assistant formally checks all tack every other week. Saddle fittings are conducted twice a year and upon the arrival of any new horse. Blankets are cleaned professionally when necessary. Barn Team volunteers clean tack monthly.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     All horses have their names on their runs. There is a map in the tack room of the runs and each run is labeled with the horse's name assigned to that run. There is a picture and bio of each horse on each horse's cubby in the tack room. Each horse has a name tag on their halter.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Each horse has a covered shelter that offers relief from direct sunlight, wind, rain, snow and other inclement weather. Each shelter is a 12 x 12 stall with a 12 x 24 run and is equipped with an automatic waterer. Feeding occurs only within the runs in order to ensure each horse's access to their specific feed. As a number of our retired horses have arthritis and lameness conditions, the stalls and runs have soft footing and the stalls have shavings for bedding. Paddocks, runs and stalls are cleaned daily. Organic biological fly control products are used to eliminate flies in the stalls, runs, and paddocks and manure is removed from the property on a regularly scheduled basis. Additionally, there are 8 pastures on the property available for pasture turn out, all with a constant source of water. Our pasture environment is an excellent option for our older horses, as turnout promotes beneficial activity. The retired horses are turned out every day and typically enjoy six to seven hours of turn out. Consistent light exercise regimens are adhered to in order to maintain range of motion and muscle strength. All retired horses are turned out only with their peers in order to guard against safety issues that may arise from pasturing with younger, more aggressive horses. Fencing is three strand smooth wire with one strand of Electrobraid. Horses that come from a stall bound environment are brought in and placed in an indiviual shed run or paddock along side members of the herd that the staff has identified as being the most likely to accept a new horse. The horse is than able to be introduced to neighboring horses while maintaining it's own safe space. Once settled in the new horse is released during turn-out into the herd of neighboring horses. Staff continues to monitor group dynamics of all the herds and adjusts herds as necessary. Horses new to a pasture turn-out enviroment are initially releaesed on a limited time frame working up to an extended turn-out time over a period of time. Dry lots are also available for horses that are unable to be turned-out on grass pasture.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     We monitor our horses carefully for changes in the body condition and body weight, because loss of condition is the most common problem in older horses. As weight loss can indicate abnormal and often treatable conditions, and lost weight is harder to regain in older horses than in younger horses we are vigilant around body weight. Each of our retired horses is on a diet that has been specifically designed for that horse's specific needs. Each horse is fed individually within a run, twice daily. All receive grain that is commercial rations designed specifically for the geriatric horse and specialized feeds that contain highly digestible fiber and a fat form for energy. We often utilize extruded grains or pellets as they are more digestible and more easily chewed. As our retired horses tend to have a decreased ability to digest fiber and chew effectively, we supply them with high-quality roughage, predominately sweet young grass and soaked beet pulp. We also feed grass hay and alfalfa mix. For those with impaired chewing we feed hay cubes or pellets that have been soaked. Feed supplements are also utilized when appropriate. Water is continually available to each horse and attention is given to water intake. The use of supplements is determined on a horse by horse basis. Our Barn Manager, often in conjunction with our veterinarian, makes those determinations.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The Henneke Body Conditioning Score each session break (4 times a year). Since horses take a while to gain weight but can lose it so easily, it is used to monitor and track their weight and muscle tone throughout the year. Sine the BCS is designed to judge the 6 places a horse loses fat and muscle first when it is notice a horse is starting to lose fat (or gain it) during a certain season, we adjust their feed and exercise accordingly and in a timely manner. Also each instance of a horse's BCS and weight tape is recorded and kept on file to see if there is any correlation between seasons (pasture grass vs hay vs grain). On the exercise and use spectrum, if the horse is holding a good weight for their size but they don’t seem to be gaining muscle or fat on their top line(due to gravity and age), building more strength in their backs during schoolings and lessen their weight limit is emphasized. Also this helps if noticed some saddles aren’t fitting as comfortably as they used to.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Our runs and paddocks are cleaned daily and manure is piled in an area that is away from all horse and people traffic. The manure is then removed from the property every other week. Organic biological fly control products are used to eliminate flies in the stalls, runs, and paddocks. Our pastures are sprayed at least twice per season for mosquitoes. Carcasses are removed from the property upon death by a removal service. We have a quarantine area for horses that need to be kept separate from the heard due to illness and staff are trained in procedures to mitigate the chances of the spread of disease to or from our facility. As with all our horse related policies and procedures, our veterinarian has helped us establish our practices.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     We have an evacuation plan in place should any emergency require that horses be removed from the property. We are very vigilant about precautions around fire. Our facility is a non-smoking facility. We have smoke detectors and fire extinguishers located throughout the buildings and properties. The local fire department visits and does an inspection annually. Staff is required to attend Emergency Training once a year to help ensure everyone is prepared. Instructors carry out volunteer and rider safety training at the start of every session (4 times a year) We also have an Emergency Procedures Manual that lays out all policies and procedures around emergency preparedness and intervention.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     We have caretakers who live on site. Our main entrance gate is closed and locked when there is no staff or caretakers on site.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Sheriff's Office Main: 303-441-3600 Alternate: 303-441-4444 FAX: 303-441-4739 Emergency: 911 Sheriff's Headquarters 5600 Flatiron Parkway Boulder, CO 80301 303-441-3626 rsullenberger@bouldercounty.org www.bouldersheriff.org

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Colorado Department of Agriculture Brand Inspection Division 305 Interlocken Parkway Broomfield CO 80021 Phone 303.869.9160 Colorado State Veterinarian's Office (303) 869-9130 Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital 300 West Drake Road Fort Collins, Colorado, 80523 Phone: (970) 297-5000 Fax: (970) 297-1205 csu-vth@colostate.edu


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/02/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Mark Fitch, DVM

Clinic Name: Quality Equine Services    Street: 3451 95th Street    City: Boulder  State: CO    Zip: 80301

Phone: 303-877-1402    Email: mfitchdvm@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Annette Gruba

     2. Instructor: Christine Overholt

     3. Instructor: Emma VanNostrand

     4. Instructor: Erica Zimmerman

     5. Instructor: Kaitlin Lamarre

     6. Instructor: Katie Da Costa Santos

     7. Instructor: Lindsey Moloznik

     8. Instructor: Lisa Strother

     9. Instructor: Michele Bruhn

     10. Instructor: Sue Winthrop


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 34.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 34

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 45

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

33 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 7 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

40 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 5 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 2 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

7 = Total of 2d-2f

33 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            27 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            6 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$28425     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$11344     Veterinarian.

$10240     Farrier.

$1057     Dentist.

$3385     Manure Removal.

$13659     Medications & Supplements.

$2114     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$68533     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$8300     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$147057     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

12250     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $12
Question 3 ($147,057 ) divided by Question 4 (12250).

Average length of stay for an equine: 306 days
Question 4 (12250) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (40).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-All of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Not at all or when issue arises

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 800

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 52

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 52

4. What is the average wait list time? 1 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 1.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 2

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 100%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Annette Gruba

         *Facility Participation:

         Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2002

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructor


     2. *Instructor: Christine Overholt

         *Facility Participation:

         Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructor


     3. *Instructor: Emma VanNostrand

         *Facility Participation:

         Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Emma is CTRC's Barn Assistant.


     4. *Instructor: Erica Zimmerman

         *Facility Participation:

         Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructor, PATH Intl. Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning


     5. *Instructor: Kaitlin Lamarre

         *Facility Participation:

         Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2013

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructor


     6. *Instructor: Katie Da Costa Santos

         *Facility Participation:

         Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructor


     7. *Instructor: Lindsey Moloznik

         *Facility Participation:

         Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Lindsey is CTRC's Barn Manager


     8. *Instructor: Lisa Strother

         *Facility Participation:

         Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructor


     9. *Instructor: Michele Bruhn

         *Facility Participation:

         Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2013

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Intl. Registered Level Instructor


     10. *Instructor: Sue Winthrop

         *Facility Participation:

         Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Sue is CTRC's Mini Trooper program leader