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CORRAL Riding Academy

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/13/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Joy Currey

Employees:   Full-Time:  5  Part-Time:  7  Volunteers:  200+

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. At CORRAL Riding Academy we follow our Standard Operating Procedures for training our volunteers and our staff.

CORRAL volunteers are required to attend a two hour classroom style volunteer training class at the beginning of their volunteer career with CORRAL. This class covers the history of CORRAL, why we use rescued horses, how and why our horses work with our girls, about at-risk girls, how to work with our girls and all of our emergency procedures and the volunteer roles at CORRAL. When discussing volunteer roles we cover the policies and procedures for each role as well as the needed qualifications for each role, training requirements, volunteer commitment, procedures and policy for each volunteer role at CORRAL. In addition to the Policy and Procedure document for each volunteer role we have volunteers sign our Code of Conduct, Confidentiality P&P and Volunteering with the Girls consent form, which is a consent to a background check. The next step for each volunteer role is shadowing an approved volunteer in the specific volunteer role until knowledge and proficiency in the role is evident and a background check is performed. Over the course of the volunteers’ time with CORRAL they are mentored by a staff member and coach when needed.

CORRAL Staff members have a similar training process. Before beginning at CORRAL all staff members have a background and references checked. Staff members then sign off on the requirements of their job description. All CORRAL Standard Operating Procedures are taught to the new staff member by the Executive Director and signed off on. Staff members self-evaluate on a monthly basis and have a full evaluation with the Executive Director twice a year and as needed. All evaluations, policies and procedures are kept each employees file.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  12

Number of Board Members:  8  Number of Voting Board Members:  8

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  Yes

If yes, provide the name, title and responsiblility of each VOTING Board member who is compensated: Joy Currey, CORRAL's Founder & President sits on the Board and is compensated for her work as the President, managing all staff & operations.

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member. Joy Currey and Rob Currey are co-founders of CORRAL. Joy is the Executive Director. Rob is a member of the Board of Directors. All finances are handled through a third party accounting firm.

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 80

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     The CORRAL Riding Academy is a faith based youth-serving nonprofit operating out of Cary, North Carolina and serving residents of Wake County. This program’s mission pairs at-risk girls between the ages of eleven and eighteen with rescued horses to promote healing, transformational growth, and ultimately, lasting life change.

Most participants have experienced significant trauma, neglect, and/or abuse which have affected their emotional and mental health, and over 70% of participants live at or below the poverty line. These factors have affected the child’s ability to succeed, often resulting in poor academic achievement, untreated mental health problems, and negative behaviors. Left unchecked, these students are at-risk for teen pregnancy, gang involvement, juvenile crime, and dropping out of school which creates an even bigger problem for our community.

At CORRAL, we believe that no matter where you come from, everyone has the ability to reach their full God-given potential, including our horses. Sometimes you just need a leg up in life” to learn how to overcome the struggles you have been faced with. The CORRAL Riding Academy provides an intervention program geared specifically for teenage girls to address these issues. CORRAL's multifaceted approach is based on five components: horseback riding, vocational training, tutoring, equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP), and mentorship. These components are designed to allow participants to gain equine knowledge and skills, while also developing the behaviors, attitudes, and skills necessary for success in life beyond horses. CORRAL is intended as a long-term intervention for each girl, requiring at minimum a one-year commitment from each participant, and anticipating a four to seven-year commitment for each student with reapplication every year. The intention of CORRAL is to shepherd at-risk youth through their difficult teenage years and into college.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. All CORRAL programs are focused or directly in relation to horses, however, academics and literary tutoring, individual and group mental health therapy and vocational/job readiness training are a large part of our program as well. Since most of our participants are behind academically, tutoring is a large part of our program.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     CORRAL accepts rescued horses from the USERL or other reputable rescue groups. Horses are fostered for a period of 30-60 days, during which time they are treated for any medical problems and begin training. If after this period the horse is deemed to be a good fit, they are adopted into the program. If not, they remain under the custody of the USERL and we help find them a more suitable home.

Horses will enter the program when they are able to:
• When they become a willing partner with their trainer
• When they are of sound mind and body

Horses are pulled out of the program for the day if they demonstrate the following:
• Any physical or mental set-backs. Lameness, Colic, Fever, Physical or Mental Fatigque

Horses will retire when/if
• They are chronically unsound, sick or sore
• They are mentally 'checked-out' or unhappy
• They are too expensive to maintain

Horses will not work more than three consecutive hours per day and not more than 5 total hours

Horses receive at least one hour of training with the Equine Director per week, and several additional hours with volunteer equine professionals. The CORRAL Riding Academy utilizes natural horsemanship principles during training.

The herd is currently at capacity with 10 horses in our herd.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     We acquire our horses from rescue organizations. We foster horses for 30-60 days while we train or retrain and evaluate for suitability in our program. We then adopt the horse from the rescue organization if deemed suitable. If adoption is not a possibility for the horse or program, but the horse is suitable for the program, then we will become a long-term foster home for the horse.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Horses will retire when/if: they become chronically unsound, sick, showing signs of mental stress, burn-out or simply need retirement.

If a horse is no longer suitable for our program we will work with the USERL and/or our expansive list of volunteers and equine partners to find a new home for the horse.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Our initial assessment includes groundwork and test rides (if possible) to determine the mental and physical state of the horse off of the property. We obtain all health records from the previous caregiver, requiring dates of the last vaccinations and a recent Coggins test prior to arrival on property. Once the horse is deemed a potential candidate for CORRAL's program, they will come to the farm.

Before being introduced to the CORRAL Herd, each new horse will go through a 15 day quarantine to insure that the horse is healthy and comfortable in their new location.

After the horse has completed quarantine, the horse will go through 30-60 days training before being introduced into the Riding Academy, to ensure the horse is ready physically and mentally.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     The Program Director spends a minimum of one hour each week per horse to assess their physical and mental health. Our feeders also do a quick check every morning during feeding and immediately report any blemishes (cuts, fungus, etc.) or lameness issues to our Equine Director. Horses are vaccinated and dewormed regularly or as directed by our veterinarian. If a horse is at-risk, geriatric, or has a serious health issue, we will consult our veterinarian on the best and most cost effective treatment option.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     We euthanize when our veterinarian advises us to do so for horses that have a life-threatening injury or illness. We do not euthanize difficult horses because we receive horses from rescue organizations and other adopters that will find another place for that horse to live.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     CORRAL does not breed horses and it is a policy not to accept stallions onto the CORRAL farm. We only accept horses that are at least 6 years of age.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: Our organization has no position on varying adoption fees as they are not applicable to our organization.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
CORRAL Riding Academy

3620 Kildaire Farm Rd. Cary NC 27518

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Joy Currey

2. Contact's Phone: 9193552090

3. Contact's Email: joy.currey@corralriding.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 5.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 20

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. CORRAL maintains four paddocks, which are seeded and fertilized twice yearly, all pastures have run-in sheds and tree lines. There is also 20 acres of accessible acres where horses are allowed to graze periodically. All paddocks are rotated as needed. CORRAL has use of a 80 x 120 stable which includes areas for equine supplies, tack storage, hay storage, equipment and tractor. Fencing surrounds the perimeter of the property and is composed of both split rail fencing and poly-cable.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     CORRAL continually maintains pastures including testing, seeding,fertilizer and cultivation twice each year. The pastures maintain themselves well given our geographical location. The horses are rotated to give pastures regrowth, generally every 2 months, but this need changes seasonally. Pastures have dense tree lines, water tanks, run-in sheds and 2 pastures have ponds, which the horses enjoy playing in.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 22

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Equine Activities are held in three different locations around the farm. A professionally renovated farm house provides academic centers for developing equine-related studies and projects. The horse barn provides a large open area for learning hands-on ground work activities and skills. The 90 x 160 outdoor arena was professionally constructed in 2010 with a split rail perimiter, footing is a crusher run base, with sand and crumb rubber. Lights were professionally installed in 2013. Riding takes place in both the outdoor arena and trails which surround the property.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     CORRAL is an verified and approved foster home for the United States Equine Rescue League.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     The truck and horse trailer are located next to the barn for easy accessibility. We also have a check list in case of emergency.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Horses are fitted with tack annually by a professional saddle fitter. We continually re-assess the fit of our tack based on the horses weight or change in conditioning.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     We display a picture of each horse in the barn and be sure that each volunteer is mentored by a more experience volunteer as part of their initial training.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     CORRAL's horses are generally turned out during the night and most of the day except for the time they are used for programming. All of our staff, volunteers and participants use use Natural Horsemanship training techniques for turn-out and retrieving horses from the pasture.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Horse are fed daily. CORRAL works with our feed company, veterinarian, farrier and NC Veteriary School to analyze our horses conditions and nutrition requirements. Horses are fed a complete feed, and hay quality is monitored and tested. If a horse is determined to need a supplement we research products and involve our veterinarian in this process as well. Some horse recieve supplements temporary and some are given supplements continuously. Mineral blocks are provided as free choice in all pastures. Water tanks are cleaned weekly and refilled daily.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Six parts of a horse are checked. withers, shoulder, ribs, loin, and tailhead. We apply light pressure so that we're able to score the horse properly. CORRAL uses this in the initial intake of rescued horses and thereby develops a nutrional plan for rehabilitation. We monitor our horses weight daily and continually adjust feed as needed.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     CORRAL's Biosecurity Plan - Incldues cleaning first and then disenfecting all equipment, buckets and feed tubs which are not shared between horses. We ask equine professionals including trainers to wash their hands before working with the horses. Feed and tack rooms are swept and kept tidy, with no standing water in barns. Horses are isolated when sick, new or returning from horse shows. Sick horse are classified as having a nasal discharge, cough, fever, diarrhea or lathargic. Manure from stalls is removed and disposed. Horses that die on the property are removed by call a humane disposal service. Horses receive fly spray daily, as well as, fly predators spread on manure piles in the early spring. Fly masks and sheets are used as needed. Veterinarian is consulted and recommendations are followed on all of these policies.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     CORRAL has an inventory of operations policy manual which address both natural and man made safety proceedures for horses and volunteers. The entire manual is available upon request. In brief; Inclement weather plan includes horses not being worked during thunderstorm watches, warnings or tornado watches or warning. In case of Fire - Stall doors are opened to the outside. Fire extiguishers are checked or replaced annually. All exits are clearly marked and exit plans displayed. Fire plans are rehearsed annually. Emergency numbers are posted in both the barn and office. CORRAL is insured by Lipstone Insurance Company which has a copy of our risk management manual on file.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The owner of the property resides on the property. We also have taken security measures by locking our fence gates at night. Staff works on the premise 8am - 8:30pm.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Wake County Sheriff's Office 820 Beacon Lake Drive Raleigh, NC 27610 Cary extension: 919-319-4517

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     none


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/13/2017

Veterinarian: Sally Vivrette DWM

Clinic Name: Triangle Equine Veterinary Services    Street: 103 Candy Apple Court    City: Cary  State: NC    Zip: 27513

Phone: 919-460-6300    Email: info@triangleservices.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Camille Brown

     2. Instructor: Hannah Lipstone

     3. Instructor: Joy Currey

     4. Instructor: Lauren Clements

     5. Instructor: Leanne Nieforth


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 10.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 10

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 10

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

10 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 1 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

11 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

0 = Total of 2d-2f

11 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            11 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$7260     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$3460     Veterinarian.

$3960     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$500     Medications & Supplements.

$330     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$16970     Horse Care Staff.

$17544     Horse Training.

$100     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$50124     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

3650     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $14
Question 3 ($50,124 ) divided by Question 4 (3650).

Average length of stay for an equine: 332 days
Question 4 (3650) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (11).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? Most of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? No

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? No

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? 2-3 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? Most of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 60

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 6

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 42

4. What is the average wait list time? 3 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 1.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 2

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 4

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 50%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed. CORRAL Riding participants participating in natural horsemanship sessions which may last 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Generally there is 1 hour of groundwork with the horse before mounting and the remaining 1/2 - 1 hour is blocked off for traditional or rhythmic riding depending on the needs of the client. The therapist and the equine specialist formalizes this process depending on the individual treatement session and it's goals. There are times when ground work or round pen work represents the entire lesson.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Camille Brown

         *Facility Participation:

         CORRAL Riding Academy

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.CORRAL Riding Academy

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.CORRAL has developed an intensive process for certifying our instructors which includes components of PATH, EAGALA and CHA.


     2. *Instructor: Hannah Lipstone

         *Facility Participation:

         CORRAL Riding Academy

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.CORRAL Riding Academy

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.CORRAL has developed an intensive process for certifying our instructors which includes components of PATH, EAGALA and CHA.


     3. *Instructor: Joy Currey

         *Facility Participation:

         CORRAL Riding Academy

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.CORRAL Riding Academy

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2008

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.CORRAL has developed an intensive process for certifying our instructors which includes components of PATH, EAGALA and CHA.


     4. *Instructor: Lauren Clements

         *Facility Participation:

         CORRAL Riding Academy

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.CORRAL Riding Academy

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2013

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.CORRAL has developed an intensive process for certifying our instructors which includes components of PATH, EAGALA and CHA.


     5. *Instructor: Leanne Nieforth

         *Facility Participation:

         CORRAL Riding Academy

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.CORRAL Riding Academy

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.CORRAL has developed an intensive process for certifying our instructors which includes components of PATH, EAGALA TF-EAP and CHA.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? No

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? No

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.