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Hoofbeats Therapeutic Riding Center

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/13/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Carol Gardner Branscome

Employees:   Full-Time:  2  Part-Time:  0  Volunteers:  30

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Hoofbeats trains lesson volunteers in formal training sessions offered at the beginning of each eight-week session. Each volunteer is given a manual that provides an overview of volunteer duties and of the program. Hoofbeats' standards for administration, facilities, and program are those of the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International and the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries; these materials are located in the Hoofbeats office for anyone to study. The standards include job descriptions, evaluation, etc.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  4

Number of Board Members:  7  Number of Voting Board Members:  7

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member. Maria Pennine, Hoofbeats instructor, and Ellen Pennine, Hoofbeats board treasurer, are sisters.

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member, and the name of the related organization. Ellen Pennine, Hoofbeats board treasurer, is on the staff of the Virginia Horse Center, which rents facilities to Hoofbeats.

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes

Additional Comments:
Hoofbeats staff and board members are committed to maintaining transparency in all aspects of the program.


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Hoofbeats offers a variety of programs: therapeutic riding sessions, a quadrille riding program, a sensory trail, Special Olympics, a Hoofbeats show team for open competition, and a "Barn Rat" volunteer program for at-risk youth.

1. Riding Sessions: Hoofbeats offers three eight-week riding sessions every year. Sessions are goal oriented toward a competition in the form of an in-house "Dinner Theater" event. At dinner theater, riders have the opportunity to show their new skills to family and friends in a positive yet challenging atmosphere. During the sessions, riders have the opportunity to join various drill teams in demonstrations, flag drills, or horse shows. Special Olympics falls during session one, and "Hear the Beat" fun shows and "Dressage with a View" open shows are options during session two. At the end of session three, Hoofbeats riders compete in the Regional Therapeutic Riding Association of Virginia (TRAV) show, where they experience what it means to be a team competing against other centers, meet new friends, and challenge themselves.

2. Quadrille Riding: Hoofbeats is known for its unique contribution to the field of therapeutic riding with its use of the drill team. This form of riding is often called the "ballet of the horse." It is based on the movements of dressage and first appeared as entertainment for royal courts. Hoofbeats presented this approach nationally at the 2002 NARHA conference and has since seen the use of drill team riding expand nationwide. Drill team riding promotes teamwork and camaraderie while it develops correct use of aids, accuracy of movements, spacing, sequencing, and planning ahead. Hoofbeats has three levels of drill. The younger crowd is called the "Drill Bits," the older crew is known as "The Cronies on Ponies," and the most serious invitational team that does demonstrations and competitions is called the "Little Hoofer Drill Team." There is something for everyone at every level in drill team. Every year Hoofbeats holds an annual dinner theater to showcase all of our riders performing quadrille. Our teams also are invited to perform as flag bearers for other equestrian events. It is an entertaining way to connect with community members whether or not they have knowledge of horses. It is also a great way to showcase what disabled riders are capable of doing.

3. Sensory Trail: Ryan's Trail opened in November 2010. It is named in honor of one of our long-time riders who loves going out of the ring. The one-mile sensory trail gives our disabled riders the opportunity to go deep into nature and experience the natural world through the senses. The rider experiences the movement of the horse as it walks through different footing such as sand, mulch, or rock dust, or as the horse climbs up and over hills designed to challenge the rider's balance as the horse's center of balance changes. The rider hears the wind in the trees and the horse's footfalls as they cross a wooden bridge. Riders see frogs in rain puddles, butterflies in bushes, and birds in trees. At the end of the trail, a trellis is designed to encourage riders to look up and use fine and gross motor skills to work pulleys and leave messages for other riders, or work for treats or small treasures. The final hill, when fully planted, will feature color and wonderful smells, including lavender, azalea, and butterfly gardens.

4. Special Olympics: Hoofbeats has been active with Special Olympics of Virginia since 1998. Hoofbeats and the Virginia Horse Center host the Regional Equestrian Games.

5. Open Competition Show Team: Riders are selected each session to participate in Hoofbeats' "Hear the Beat" or "Dressage with a View" shows. Riders are expected to act as members of a team, and this experience gives them a chance to prove to themselves that they can compete in an open show venue. This in turn promotes riders' self-esteem and enhances their social acceptance in the larger community.

6. "Barn Rat" Program: This program for at-risk youth allows kids to come to Hoofbeats to learn work skills. Participants sign a code of conduct and have the opportunity to learn about horses, the horse industry, and themselves.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. N/A

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Hoofbeats Therapeutic Riding Center is a Premier Accredited Center of the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International, and we meet or exceed all PATH standards for screening, horse care, and training. Hoofbeats also is a member center of the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries and the Therapeutic Riding Association of Virginia. Hoofbeats meets or exceeds all of the standards for these organizations for administration, facilities, and programs. Between them, our two instructors have more than 60 years of horse knowledge and experience, and they directly supervise any contact with our horses. Our books are completely open with our records of more than 20 years of meeting all of these standards on a regular basis. Our barn has ten stalls, so our herd is limited to ten horses. Horses considered for donation or loan to the program are rigorously evaluated. (See response to Question 3 below.) We love our horses and feel that they are gifts from God and precious to our own lives and to the people of the Hoofbeats community. Our horses are the centerpiece of our work.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     We acquire our horses through donations or loans. All Hoofbeats policies regarding this process are posted on our website, www.hoof-beats.com. Materials include donation/loan information, an application, and a formal agreement.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Hoofbeats' policy for removal of equines from the program (PATH Program Standard 6) is as follows:

Horses may be removed from the program for any number of reasons including but not limited to:

1. Unsoundness that has worsened or become unmanageable with medications


2. Increased cost of upkeep

3. Behavioral changes in either ground manners or riding manners that are counterproductive to therapeutic riding goals

4. Changes in pasture manners that are disruptive to the herd

5. Training or size or abilities no longer match the needs of the current client population

The head instructor will consult with the board of directors and the program director to make these decisions. Every effort will be made by the instructor to find a suitable new situation for the horse, including return to the original donor, donation to someone looking for a "companion" horse or backyard horse, or retirement to a suitable farm or to someone looking for a quiet mount.

In more than twenty years, just two Hoofbeats horses have been adopted. Hoofbeats' adoption practices and procedures meet the standards of the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries. Hoofbeats does not have any recruitment initiatives to attract potential adopters, because our retired horses return to their owners or live on our instructors' farms. Currently, three retired therapy horses live at assistant instructor Maria Pennine's farm, and another retired therapy horse lives at director Carol Branscome's farm.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Horses that are considered for service in the program go through a quarantine process in a separate paddock for 14 days and undergo a veterinarian and farrier evaluation prior to inclusion in the herd. All horses must come with vaccination and health history and Coggins test. Staff evaluate horses within a 90-day trial period during which we expose them to anything that we can anticipate them being asked to do in their work here.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Our horses tend to be geriatric and are constantly evaluated for problems that are taken care of on an as-needed basis, such as chiropractic work. Horses at Hoofbeats are vaccinated in the spring and fall and have their teeth checked at that time. Any dental work that is required is scheduled based on those exams. Horses are dewormed every three months or more often if needed. Horses receive farrier care every six weeks March through November and every eight weeks December through February. They are given supplements per veterinarian recommendation as needed. When a horse cannot work comfortably, it is retired.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Hoofbeats' euthanasia policy (PATH Program Standard 6) is as follows: Horses in service to Hoofbeats that die or must be put down will be buried on the site or cremated.

In more than twenty years, and in dealing with an older horse population, this has come up on occasion. I have put horses down because of pituitary brain tumors, strangulated colons, and strokes. We would never destroy a healthy horse for any reason.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     We do not breed horses, and we do not accept pregnant horses. We do not keep stallions, and we also do not board horses.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training? 
     N/A

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. 
     N/A

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     N/A

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: N/A



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Hoofbeats Therapeutic Riding Center

487 Maury River Rd. Lexington VA 24450

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Carol Branscome

2. Contact's Phone: 540-464-3337

3. Contact's Email: hoofbeats@rockbridge.net

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Virginia Horse Center, 487 Maury River Rd., Lexington, VA 24450

Contact: Leigh Anne Claywell, 540-464-2960, laclaywell@horsecenter.org

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Hoofbeats has a yearlong lease running Jan. 1 through Dec. 31. We plan to renew our lease, as we have for the past 11 years.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     The Virginia Horse Center provides security for the center as well as maintenance for the arena and paddocks. Hoofbeats' monthly rent is $1,000.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 2.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 12

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Hoofbeats has a 10-stall barn with a tack room and a feed room. We bed with sawdust and have rubber mats in stalls. Each horse has a 12x12 box stall with a window. We have a large paddock (5 acres) for up to four horses with two run-in sheds (10x12), two smaller paddocks (3 acres each) with a 10x12 run-in shed in each, and one small single paddock (3/4 acre) with a 10x12 run-in shed. Paddocks are fenced with horse woven wire fencing and electric on top. Paddocks do not have grass, but round bales or hay baskets are available at all times.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     In warm weather, horses are turned out at night and are indoors during the day, and in cold weather this system is reversed. There are round bales or hay baskets in the fields at all times.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 12

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Training, riding, and equine-related activities take place in a vinyl-fenced arena with a sand and rock dust footing that is regularly maintained by the Virginia Horse Center. The one-mile Sensory Trail through the woods is inspected daily for hazards such as fallen trees. The therapy herd is made up of older animals, and we make every effort to ensure their comfort.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Hoofbeats is accredited by the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH International), which accredits therapeutic riding centers, as well as the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS), which accredits equine organizations that utilize donated or rescued horses in their programs and ensure lifetime humane care of those horses through adoption or retirement.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Hoofbeats has access to an equine ambulance located on the Virginia Horse Center grounds. In addition, both Hoofbeats instructors have personal trailers.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     The instructors inspect tack for signs of wear at the beginning of each eight-week riding session. Also, a professional saddle fitter evaluates each horse at the start of the program year for saddle fit. Instructors also prepare a daily list of horse-rider-tack combinations.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Horses have stall cards with picture identification, and the horse profile binder is located in the office with complete medical history and personal information. Staff and volunteers go through a training process that familiarizes them with all aspects of horse care.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Hoofbeats horses are not normally stall bound except in case of injury. Horses go out at night during summer and during the day in winter. All horses have a personal stall that is cleaned daily and supplied with hay, fresh water, and mineral blocks.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     The feeding schedule is located in the feed room with all horses listed as to feed, supplements, and any special needs. Only staff feed the horses, although volunteers may help. Staff monitor the feed on a daily basis to make changes as needed. All feed charts may be viewed in the horse files and are kept with yearly records. Staff work with the veterinarian on progressive horse maintenance.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     A Purina representative conducted a seminar at Hoofbeats for staff and volunteers in 2013. The program director considers this score in making decisions on the feeding schedules.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     The stalls are cleaned daily and during the day as needed. Water buckets inside and outside are scrubbed daily. Horses that come onto the grounds are monitored for two weeks in a quarantine paddock. Manure is disposed of by the Virginia Horse Center. Horses that pass away are buried on the VHC grounds. Our veterinarian is consulted anytime questions arise.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     There is a very detailed binder located in the office that guides all of our emergency plans. These guidelines and plans meet or exceed the requirements for the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International and the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The Virginia Horse Center provides security for Hoofbeats. The gates to the road are closed when the guard is off duty.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Rockbridge County Sheriff's Department, 258 Greenhouse Rd., Lexington, VA 24450, Animal Control 540-463-7328, rcsopatrol@yahoo.com

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     1. Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries: PO Box 32294, Washington, DC 20007; contact person is Robin Mason, robin@sanctuaryfederation.org, 623-252-5122. 2. PATH International: PO Box 33150, Denver, CO 80233; pathintl@pathintl.org; 800-369-7433 and 303-452-1212.


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/07/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Tracy Bell

Clinic Name: Bell Veterinary Service    Street: 1111 Bell Town Rd.    City: Lexington  State: VA    Zip: 24450

Phone: 877-295-8831    Email: tabvdm@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Carol Branscome

     2. Instructor: Maria Pennine


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 9.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 6

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 10

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 2 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

10 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 2 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 1 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

3 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            7 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$18190     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$564     Bedding.

$1500     Veterinarian.

$2855     Farrier.

$1000     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$2843     Medications & Supplements.

$2005     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$998     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$29955     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

2982     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $10
Question 3 ($29,955 ) divided by Question 4 (2982).

Average length of stay for an equine: 298 days
Question 4 (2982) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (10).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-All of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 150

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 50

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 36

4. What is the average wait list time? 1 Weeks(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 3.00  Un-Mounted: 0.00  Total: 3

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 100%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed. N/A


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Carol Branscome

         *Facility Participation:

         Hoofbeats Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1994

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH International Certified Instructor, Member No. 10005

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Special Olympics of Virginia

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1998

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Certified Instructor

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Carol Branscome was graduated from Radford University in 1985 with a major in sociology and a minor in English. She rode on the intercollegiate invitational eventing team and was a member of the Radford Redcoats drill team. She is a lifelong horse owner and competitive rider with more than 35 years' experience teaching riding, horsemanship, and stable management. Her specialties are dressage and synchronized team riding (quadrille) for the disabled.


     2. *Instructor: Maria Pennine

         *Facility Participation:

         Hoofbeats Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1998

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH International Certified Instructor, Member No. 38819

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Special Olympics of Virginia

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1998

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Special Olympics Coach

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Before coming to Hoofbeats Therapeutic Riding Center, Maria Pennine worked for nine years at the Rhode Island Zoo where she was an elephant trainer.