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Thoroughbred Placement Resources, Inc.

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 02/18/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Kimberly Godwin Clark

Employees:   Full-Time:  0  Part-Time:  0  Volunteers:  30

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. We have a Volunteer Manual as well as a Policies and Procedures Manual. In addition any volunteers working with horses must do so under the supervision of head Trainer Kimberly Clark and Farm Volunteer Coordinator, Jacqueline Redmond.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  4

Number of Board Members:  5  Number of Voting Board Members:  5

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Today, with a heightened awareness by racetracks and the advent of the Thoroughbreds for All movement, moving horses off of the track quickly has become less of a crisis. One of the consequences of moving so many horses off the track and into the hands of the public is that more than a few horses have ended up with people who are not qualified to handle and retrain a horse directly off the track.

In Dr. Andrew Mcleans book, The Truth About Horses researchers Odberg and Bouisseau found in a study conducted in 1999 that of 3,000 non-racing horses sent to the slaughterhouse in France between the ages of two and seven years, 66.4% were condemned for inappropriate behavior. The fact that these statistics come from countries with well-established equestrian traditions gives no grounds for believing that the figures would be much different elsewhere.

In addition to horses with training issues, many horses with soundness problems are difficult to place due not only to the cost of rehabilitation, but also the lack of skills needed to correctly rest and rehabilitate a horse. In most cases, proper rest and rehab results in an excellent prognosis and a sound horse ready for a qualified adoption.

TPR has the specialized skills to address these two high-risk categories of horses. Leighton Farm, the home base of TPR was designed for active racehorses to rest and rehabilitate. In addition, Kimberly Godwin Clark, principal equestrian at Leighton Farm is a professional exercise rider, owner and trainer with over 25 years experience. In her 25 years working at the track as a rider, trainer and racehorse owner, Godwin Clark took many horses to the farm for rest and rehabilitation giving her a quarter century of experience in properly handling horses. She now works with some of the top show trainers in the United States in order to develop their skills to produce correctly retrained and rideable retired racehorses.

In addition, our Hero Horses Program was formally launched on April 26, 2015, and has continued to grow and expand with increased participation from America's Heroes. You can find out more about it by visiting the goodhorse.org website.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. We are 100% horse related.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Our focus is on promoting the retired racehorse for adoption, but we also have a program for Veterans, Wounded Warriors and their families that operates within our retraining and adoption program at Leighton Farm where Thoroughbred Placement Resources, Inc. is based.

Kimberly Godwin Clark galloped Thoroughbred racehorses for 30 years before working extensively with Jim Wofford, Elizabeth Madlener and David Loman to learn the classical principles of retraining Thoroughbred racehorses for Dressage, Eventing, Show Jumping, Trail and pleasure riding. This can best be seen in the online retraining manual I wrote and continue to revise and add to. It can be found on Amazon in both printed and download versions.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Surrender, adoption and donation are the ways we acquire horses in the TPR program.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Adopters of our horses are required to fill out a reference application and be approved to adopt. Horses are posted on the TPR website and advertised on many websites. All homes must be approved to adopt and are required to sign an adoption contract giving TPR a right of first refusal if the horse is ever rehomed. We have several permanent residents at our facility. While we do experience some horses are more difficult to rehome than others - we are successful in finding homes for all horses given the time needed. Humane euthanasia is only considered if the horse is in severe pain and there are no other options.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Most horses are located at an area racetrack. My vet goes over them and their health history with their current vet. At that point decisions are made of whether to radiograph or do any other diagnostic work. All horses are required to have a current coggins before departing to their foster farm or the main facility, Leighton Farm. It can be easily drawn while at the track. Upon arrival, all horses have their teeth done immediately. If deemed healthy by the vet, I normally get on them shortly after arrival at the farm. A let down/retraining plan is developed for each horse individually.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     All horses are evaluated before arrival at the farm. Most are in good health - while we do rehabilitate some horses, our work is primarily in the transitioning area after retirement. We have a feeding, vaccination, deworming and dental protocol that is available on the goodhorse.org website. Basic Feeding Protocol for TPR Horses. This is a guideline and each horse should be treated as an individual. When we bring the horse directly from the track to the farm he is on a "grain high". Most of the horses coming off the track have been receiving huge amounts of grain. Upon arrival, our normal beginning point for feeding at Leighton Farm is two quarts of Safe Starch Forage and only 2 cups of Legends HayStretcher twice per day. We add one half cup of vegetable oil in the evening feeding as a high quality source of fat. These amounts, we give for the first week. It is a cleaning out period. All horses are given access to free choice hay at all times. All horses are treated for Ulcers with Neighlox given orally. I don't worry if the horse doesn't want to eat this for the first few days or even a week as long as he is eating hay and not acting sick. They are used to eating "candy" feed that is rich and high in sugars and molasses. This diet is rather bland compared to that of the working racehorse and most horses take a few days to accept the fact that that's all they're going to get. They do learn to look forward to it and enjoy it as much as the race feed, and they feel better too. There are two main reasons I use the forage with the Legends Hay Stretcher pellets. The first being it stretches a small meal into a larger one. Racehorses are used to huge amounts of grain and a quart or two of Legends Hay Stretcher pellets is a meager meal when standing alone. The other and more important reason is that I have experienced a few horses that suffered from choke caused by straight pellets. I don't know if this is because the use of pellets at the track is rare or if it's just that some horses can't handle pellets. I can say that I've never had choke since I began mixing the pellets with the forage. We generally do not feed any grain because I want to get them off of the "grain high" as soon as possible. I believe that many Thoroughbreds (maybe other breeds too, I just have experience with Thoroughbreds), are very sensitive to the sugars found in most grains. I avoid anything with large amounts of molasses or other sweeteners. Legends Hay Stretcher is fortified to be a complete meal for the horse, it is 11 percent protein. In the second week we increase the Legends Hay Stretcher to 1 quart, keeping the Forage and vegetable oil at the same amounts. All horses have free choice hay at all times. Most horses on this diet maintain a good weight and settle into farm life quickly. Growing horses may require larger proportions or even more protein. When the horse begins to work hard enough that he is building muscle or if he is young and growing I add a 1/2 quart of alfalfa hay cubes twice per day for an easily digestible source of protein. Each horses diet is evaluated and updated on the individuals needs. Some horses receive as much as 4 quarts of Legends Hay Stretcher and a cup of vegetable oil in each meal. At Leighton Farm, we have explored many different fat supplements and finally came back to vegetable oil. The reason is it is 100% fat and is also a good source of antioxidants. It is also the most cost effective. It can be a little more work intensive due to its oily nature meaning it can be messy, but its benefits far outweigh the disadvantages. If the horse hasnt been receiving a source of fat in his diet, it will take about 30 days for his body to begin to utilize it. Horses that come to us in need of substantial weight gain are also fed soaked beet pulp. Horses over the age of 15 that are in training or show signs of having had extensive stomach ulcers or are over the age of 17 years old are fed Purina Senior. If you decide to try this diet there are many different companies that offer a variety of hay stretcher products. Check to be sure the one you use is fortified to offer the needed protein and minerals a horse in work requires. If the particular brand you select does not, you will need to supplement these. Also take special care when selecting forage. Many types of forage are sprayed with molasses. The Triple Crown Safe Starch Forage is not and that is the reason for our selection. This is the diet given to all horses at Leighton Farm and if you have the time to visit, you will find that the horses here are shiny, calm and carry good weight.

Vaccine and Deworming Practices - January Ivermectin, February mid March, Tetanus EEE/WEE, Intranasal flu, West Nile Virus VEE, Strongid, mid April Strongid, May, June Potomac Rabies, July Moxidectin, August, September Intranasal flu, October Fenbendazole, November, December.

Guidelines for Dental Care, Horses should be scheduled to be seen by an equine dentist upon arrival to provide a baseline before the horse is ridden. Horses under the age of 5 and over the age of 15 years old should be seen by an equine dentist every six months. Those over the age of 5 and 15 years should be seen yearly.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Euthanasia of adoptable horses in our program will be avoided whenever possible. This is accomplished by actively promoting to find these animals suitable homes. They will remain safely in our care, for as long as it takes, to find them homes. Or they may be transferred to another approved, no-kill organization with similar policies.

Euthanasia of adoptable animals because of lack of space is not a viable option. Thoroughbred Placement Resources, Inc. adheres to the policies of a NO-KILL shelter. TPR, Inc. does NOT send equines to auction, commercial dealer, shipment to slaughter, brokers, or any other un-traceable outlet Equines who are suffering physically, mentally, or emotionally on a severe or chronic basis may be candidates for euthanasia. Euthanasia is to be considered only after reasonable and appropriate exploration of all other viable options. It is never a decision that is made without utmost consideration for what is best for the animals. A candidate for euthanasia may be an equine which has: poor prognosis, painful protracted recovery, incurable serious illness; or an equine that is non-responsive to treatment; or one for whom treatment is not reasonably available. Equines deemed to pose an unacceptable and serious danger to other animals, themselves, or the public may be candidates for euthanasia. The euthanasia process is initiated by Kimberly Clark, based on input and discussion from relevant sources: foster home, veterinarian, trainer, farrier, or others involved in the equines evaluation. Euthanasia Protocol. Medically necessitated euthanasia: Euthanasia is considered for animals suffering from an acute or chronic illness. Quality of life and the best interest of the equine is the number one concern.

Euthanasia may be requested for an injured animal who is not a candidate for treatment or whose injuries are not treatable. Emergency euthanasia, such as severe break of a long bone, may be initiated on the judgment of the Program Director. In the interest of preventing severe ongoing suffering, full Board of Directors approval will not be required. Examples of conditions which may necessitate euthanasia are: organ failure, stroke, inability to stand up despite handlers efforts to assist, severe neurological conditions (eg. untreatable EPM), fracture of bones especially long-bones, progressive later stages of arthritis affecting quality of life, any untreatable condition that impairs the equine from walking to his food/hay/herd, certain congenital abnormalities or defects or any other serious/chronic illness with a poor prognosis or not reasonable responsive to treatment. Quality of life & risk to the health of the other animals and humans will be considered in the decision.

Behaviorally necessitated euthanasia: A request due to behavioral reasons may be generated by a concern the animals poses an unmanageable threat to staff, public safety, or to other animals; or for a concern for the quality of life the animal is likely to achieve when behavior modification regiment cannot lessen the equines severe distress. Professional training, environmental modification, veterinarian-prescribed medications, hormone treatment, or any other reasonable avenues will be explored before this animal is deemed a candidate for euthanasia. Examples of conditions which might require euthanasia are: a blind horse who is not adapting well to his new surrounding and posing a danger to himself or others, an equine so unmanageable he cannot be cannot be caught or handled even by a professional especially when he has a medical condition that needs treatment, an equine with a history of seriously intentionally injuring other people and with whom re-training has failed, or an elderly horse who is not adapting well to the loss of her herd mate & who refuses to eat or move despite all efforts to help her.

PROCEDURE upon decision to euthanasia: Once all reasonable efforts have been exhausted,the euthanasia is authorized through the Board of Directors (unless an emergency, as outlined above). Depending on the health & condition of the equine, it may be done on or off farm. Should the equine be transported for this purpose, the trailer ride should be short and comfortable, and done only in a safe, equine-approved trailer. All animals will be given: A quiet, comfortable shelter to rest. Food and treats, as prescribed by staff. When appropriate, the equine will receive visits from staff & volunteers. When appropriate, staff will spend quality time with the animal. This may involve giving the animal extra grooming, a walk in nice grass, or other rewarding activity the animal may enjoy. Comfort measures such as pain control and sedation may be administered, as prescribed by staff or veterinarian. The euthanasia process will be conducted in a manner humane and respectful to the animal. Whenever possible it will be done out of the view of other animals. Euthanasia is performed in accordance with AVMA guidelines. After euthanasia is completed, the animal will continue to be handled in an appropriate & respectful manner. The captive bolt gun is not an acceptable method to perform euthanasia on an equine and shall never be used.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     We have a no breeding policy in our adoption contract. It is very rare that a horse would become pregnant at the racetrack. While it is not impossible that it could happen we would consult a veterinary on the course of care for the foal and mother.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     Yes

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     Foster homes must pass a reference check and on site inspection. Horses are monitored through pictures and video throughout their time at the foster facility. Fosters are required to sign a contract agreeing to TPR guidelines for care of the horses and to supply veterinary records of such care. TPR volunteers are allowed to inspect the foster farm at any time. Fosters are selected based on their reputation and the results of the inspection and reference check. We provide a detailed handout on how TPR horses are to be cared for and handled. This can be found on the goodhorse.org website.

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: $201 to $500

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine level of training.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine health and soundness.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization approves of this concept.
  Our organization feels that increasing/varying fees may extend the length of stay for individual equines in our care.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: The more retraining a retired racehorse has, the better his chances of success after his race career ends. He is also more likely to represent his breed in a positive way.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Leighton Farm

13130 Molly Berry Road Upper Marlboro MD 20772

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Kimberly Clark

2. Contact's Phone: 410-802-8425

3. Contact's Email: kclark@goodhorse.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Kimberly and William Clark
13130 Molly Berry Road
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     My husband owns Leighton Farm. TPR does have a lease agreement with him for it's use. We have a year to find a new facility and would relocate horses, using foster farms in the interim if needed. The agreement is self renewing each year. It began in November 2008.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     Owner is not compensated - he does this for his wife - and the horses. He mows, makes all farm/barn repairs as needed.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 1.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 20

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. We have 12 stalls in two barns - all 12x12 stalls. Three 3+ acre fields, each with a turn out shed. Flex fence in all fields. Three round pens.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Some horses here are on stall rest. We do not put more than four horses in a field at one time. Horses are turned out a minimum of 5 hours unless they want to come in earlier. Some racehorses don't like to be out for long periods and we cater to that. We normally replant and rest one field in the spring for several months.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 8

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     150x250 sand arena for dressage and stadium jumping. We also have cross country jumps and bridle trails.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     We are fully accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries and the Thoroughbred Accreditation Alliance.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Leighton Farm has two trucks and two gooseneck trailers that can be made to box stalls.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? No

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Kimberly Godwin Clark, head trainer and rider at Leighton Farm, home of TPR, works closely with Gold Medal Olympian and Saddle Innovator, Tad Coffin of Tad Coffin Performance Saddles. We use his saddles exclusively and they are created to fit any horse. You can visit the Tad Coffin Performance Saddles website to learn about this cutting edge technology.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Leighton Farm has a board with stall assignments and turn out assignments. Volunteers are never allowed to handle/work with horses unless under direct supervision of Kimberly Clark.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     There is one barn with two stalls on the end that you can open sliding doors to provide a more open environment for stall bound horses. Lay up horses are normally transitioned under the supervision of a vet to hand walking, rounds pens and eventually normal turn out and riding as directed by the vet.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     BASIC FEEDING PROTOCOL FOR TPR HORSES This is a guideline and each horse should be treated as an individual. When we bring the horse directly from the track to the farm he is on a "grain high". Most of the horses coming off the track have been receiving huge amounts of grain. Upon arrival, our normal beginning point for feeding at Leighton Farm is two quarts of Safe Starch Forage and only 2 cups of Legends HayStretcher twice per day. We add ½ cup of soy oil in the evening feeding as a high quality source of fat. These amounts, we give for the first week. It is a cleaning out period. All horses are given access to free choice hay at all times. All horses are treated for Ulcers with Neighlox given orally. I don't worry if the horse doesn't want to eat this for the first few days or even a week - as long as he is eating hay and not acting sick. They are used to eating "candy" feed that is rich and high in sugars and molasses. This diet is rather bland compared to that of the working racehorse and most horses take a few days to accept the fact that that's all they're going to get. They do learn to look forward to it and enjoy it as much as the race feed, and they feel better too. There are two main reasons I use the forage with the Legends Hay Stretcher pellets. The first being it stretches a small meal into a larger one. Racehorses are used to huge amounts of grain and a quart or two of Legends Hay Stretcher pellets is a meager meal when standing alone. The other and more important reason is that I have experienced a few horses that suffered from choke caused by straight pellets. I don't know if this is because the use of pellets at the track is rare or if it's just that some horses can't handle pellets. I can say that I've never had choke since I began mixing the pellets with the forage. We generally do not feed any grain because I want to get them off of the "grain high" as soon as possible. I believe that many Thoroughbreds (maybe other breeds too, I just have experience with Thoroughbreds), are very sensitive to the sugars found in most grains. I avoid anything with large amounts of molasses or other sweeteners. Legends Hay Stretcher is fortified to be a complete meal for the horse, it is 11 percent protein. In the second week we increase the Legends Hay Stretcher to 1 quart, keeping the Forage and vegetable oil at the same amounts. All horses have free choice hay at all times. Most horses on this diet maintain a good weight and settle into farm life quickly. Growing horses may require larger proportions or even more protein. When the horse begins to work hard enough that he is building muscle or if he is young and growing I add a 1/2 quart of alfalfa hay cubes twice per day for an easily digestible source of protein. Each horses diet is evaluated and updated on the individuals needs. Some horses receive as much as 4 quarts of Legends Hay Stretcher and a cup of vegetable oil in each meal. At Leighton Farm, we have explored many different fat supplements and finally came back to vegetable oil. The reason is it is 100% fat and is also a good source of anti-oxidants. It is also the most cost effective. It can be a little more work intensive due to its oily nature meaning it can be messy, but its benefits far outweigh the disadvantages. If the horse hasnt been receiving a source of fat in his diet, it will take about 30 days for his body to begin to utilize it. Horses that come to us in need of substantial weight gain are also fed soaked beet pulp. Horses over the age of 15 that are in training or show signs of having had extensive stomach ulcers or are over the age of 17 years old are fed Purina Senior. If you decide to try this diet there are many different companies that offer a variety of hay stretcher products. Check to be sure the one you use is fortified to offer the needed protein and minerals a horse in work requires. If the particular brand you select does not, you will need to supplement these. Also take special care when selecting forage. Many types of forage are sprayed with molasses. The Triple Crown Safe Starch Forage is not and that is the reason for our selection. This is the diet given to all horses at Leighton Farm and if you have the time to visit, you will find that the horses here are shiny, calm and carry good weight.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Most of the horses arrive here in good shape. All are evaluated by a vet and the bet helps to design the retraining and let down plan for individual horses.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Horses that are in need of euthanasia are rare, but it is normally done at the track and therefore we do not handle carcass removal. In the event it is necessary to euthanize a horse here at Leighton Farm or one dies. Valley Proteins is available for carcass removal at a price. Our manure is kept far from the barn and removed by those who use it as fertilizer. We use Streufex which turns into excellent compost and is desireable to those with gardens and farmers. All horses are sprayed with fly spray several times per day - morning, before riding and after riding/bath. Sensitive horses wear fly sheets. We do not have a huge parasite problem as manure is kept far from the barn. There are well cared for barn cats for rodent control and plastc owls and other bird discouragement devices throughout the barn areas.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     During winter, a minimum of 100 bales of hay is kept on hand at all times and we have minimum amounts of feed to signal its time to order. Less than: 5 bays Hay Stretcher 4 bales of Safe Starch Forage 10 bags of bedding Signal an order is to be made from R&D. They normally deliver within 2 days. In the case of medical emergency for horses, our contact Dr. Morgan Dove initially. If you are unsure it is a medical emergency please call Dr. Morgan Dove. Then call Kimberly Clark if she is off site. There are two shippers to contact in the event the horse must be shipped and a driver is not here for the on site horse trailer. Contact Kappel Horse Transportation for most cases. If the horse requires special care, contact DaVinci Equine Transport. We have a generator that works the well in the case of a power outage and in the event the generator does not work, our farm has a stream bordering two sides of it which is a back up source of water for the animals here at Leighton Farm.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     We live at the farm and it is 1/4 mile from the road. We are far in the country and security is not a huge issue.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Prince Georges County Animal Management Division 3750 Brown Station Road Upper Marlboro, MD 20772 (301) 780-7200 Fax: (301) 780-7258 Prince Georges County Animal Management Division Rodney Taylor, Associate Director Terri Littlejohn, Assistant Associate Director 3750 Brown Station Road Upper Marlboro, MD 20772 (301) 780-7200 Fax: (301) 780-7258

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Maryland Jockey Club P.O. Box 130 Laurel, MD 20725 Racing Secretary, Georgeanne Hale (301) 725-0400 Pimlico 5201 Park Heights Avenue Baltimore, MD 21215 Racing Secretary, Georgeanne Hale (410) 542-9400


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 02/02/2017

Veterinarian: Morgan Dove

Clinic Name: Chesapeake Equine    Street: P.O. Box 978    City: Bowie  State: MD    Zip: 20718

Phone: 410-365-0779    Email: TheDoves@comcast.net


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Kimberly Clark


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 10.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 13

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 16

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Medications/supplements is included in veterinary.

14 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 10 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

24 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 14 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

14 = Total of 2d-2f

10 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            6 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            4 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$33812     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$3130     Bedding.

$12618     Veterinarian.

$9440     Farrier.

$1380     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$0     Medications & Supplements.

$18312     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$19935     Horse Care Staff.

$8271     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$106898     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

3872     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $28
Question 3 ($106,898 ) divided by Question 4 (3872).

Average length of stay for an equine: 161 days
Question 4 (3872) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (24).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses?

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-All of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? 2-3 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Not at all or when issue arises

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Kimberly Clark

         *Facility Participation:

         Leighton Farm

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. I work regularly with Grand Prix Dressage Coach, Elizabeth Madlener, Olympian Jim Wofford and Joe Fargis. I galloped racehorses for 30 years, giving me the appropriate skills to transition retiring racehorses from race to sporthorses. We do not give riding lessons to anyone - only ride and retrain retired racehorses.