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Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program, Inc.

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 02/05/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Malaika Albrecht

Employees:   Full-Time:  1  Part-Time:  13  Volunteers:  110

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. There are written job descriptions for each staff position at Rocking Horse Ranch, revised by the director in conjunction with Board of Directors as changes in staff assignments occur. Job descriptions are signed by employees and kept in their files. Training and direct supervision of barn and maintenance staff members is the direct responsibility of our full-time barn manager. Orientation of new instructors and supervision of instructors is the responsibility of the executive director. The director meets annually with individual instructors to review job performance and also schedules regular meetings with the entire staff to plan and problem solve issues relative to the lesson schedule and program offerings. New volunteer orientation is scheduled before every fall, spring, and summer lesson session, and includes verbal, written, and video information and instruction as well as hands on practice in mock lessons supervised by the instructor staff. The instructor/volunteer coordinator is responsible for scheduling all lesson and barn volunteers, as well as for providing individual orientation to new volunteers who come into the program at other times. She also handles any issues regarding volunteers who may need some remedial training as reported to her by other instructors or staff. Rocking Horse Ranch is currently in the process of accreditation as a PATHIntl premier center, so all of the human resource paperwork has been updated during the past year to comply with all relevant PATH standards.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  12

Number of Board Members:  16  Number of Voting Board Members:  15

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member. Two of our board members, Dr Charles Willson and Wendy Willson, are a married couple, one a retired pediatrician and the other a paralegal who has been employed for some time by the firm of our board president. The retired physician served on our board several years ago, prior to the board involvement of either his wife or her employer. Both of the Willson's are long time supporters of our program with extensive horse experience, having bred and have raised show ponies for many years.

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Rocking Horse Ranch is a PATHIntl member center; our programming presently includes individual and group therapeutic riding lessons, ground school, and group activities in interactive vaulting and in equine facilitated learning. We have also recently initiated an off-site outreach program using miniature horses

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. N/A

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     For horses accepted into our program, our barn/equine manager/instructor develops a plan and schedule, including a dietary plan in consultation with our vet, for training and conditioning each horse that takes into account the types of program activities for which the horse will be used. That training generally includes a significant amount of Parelli type ground work, as well as lunging, round pen work, long lining, and exercise under saddle. It also includes daily turn-out time as part of a group. The goal is to maintain all our horses in good physical and mental condition for the work they do, so that they are willing partners in our equine assisted activities programs. Written records are kept noting work time in various types of lessons as well as training sessions. Daily time spent in lessons falls well within PATHIntl guidelines. At this time, we have 9 horses and 2 miniature horses in our barn (one under our present maximum capacity), all of whom work in the lesson program. We consider each horse that joins our herd to be a long term member of our program, so we generally do not evaluate horses older than 18, nor horses that would be considered rescues or which have significant soundness issues. We are committed to high quality equine care that will allow each of our horses to have a long and useful life working in our program, followed by a retirement on site unless we can find a quality placement elsewhere.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Program horses are acquired either through donation, purchase, or long term loan. (At present, 2 of our horses were donated, 6 were purchased, and 3 are on long term loan). Because of our long evaluation process, we avoid situations in which we would have to make an immediate decision on keeping/rejecting a horse for our program (ie auction sale). We will not take into our program horses that, during the evaluation process, are judged to have significant chronic health, soundness, or behavioral issues, as our mission is not equine rehabilitation and we do not have funding to devote to the care of these animals. In our experience, horses being retired by owners and offered to us as donations are frequently either aged or not sound enough to be considered for our program. In the recent past, we have looked for horses to fill specific roles in our program, such as having the potential to be trained as an interactive vaulting horse or for a horse of sufficient size to be suitable for larger adult beginner independent lessons.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Our policy regarding horses that can no longer be used in the program depends on whether these are owned by or on loan to the program. In the past 10 years, 3 "loaned" horses have been returned to their owners, either at our request or that of the owner. One horse owned by the program became burned out after 3 years and, after trying time off, retraining, etc, was placed in a new home with a single owner - this placement was facilitated by our vet. It is our policy to place an aged, healthy retired horse with a private owner only if a very suitable retirement situation can be found, and if we are completely satisfied with the housing, care and proposed use of our retired horse. Otherwise a program horse will be retired on our property. Since 2003, we have retired 3 program owned horses from the riding program; two remained on site and eventually were euthanized for health reasons; after more than a year of retirement on site, the other was placed into a single owner situation as a pasture mate for another horse.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Each prospective horse is first evaluated by members of our staff at its home location if possible, and, if considered a good candidate for our program, it is then brought to our facility for a 4-6 week trial. Prior to arrival, the owner must provide us with a current negative Coggins test as well as all other recent vet and farrier records. During the trial period, the horse is stabled and turned out apart from our regular herd and is not used with or around any students; staff members assess the horse's ground manners, gaits under saddle, tolerance for ramps, lesson props, leaders and sidewalkers, and unbalanced riders, ending with full mock lessons using multiple staff members. During this time, our vet also performs a health and soundness pre-purchase type of evaluation. Temperament, size, soundness and quality of gaits, ground manners, and ability to perform specific types of activities (ie lead line or independent lessons) are all elements that factor into our final decision, much more so than breed or appearance. The decision to keep or return a prospective lesson horse is made jointly with all staff involved in the evaluation and giving consideration to the recommendation of our vet.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Each horse has a health care file that is maintained by our barn/equine manager who records all vet and farrier visits as well as weight tape and body score evaluations that are completed twice a year. Per the recommendation of our vet, vaccinations are done on each horse every 6 months or annually, depending upon the specific vaccine. A Coggins is drawn yearly and yearly dental evaluations are done with interventions (including changes in diet for our older horses) based on findings. Per recommendation of our vet, we have changed to a 6 month strategic deworming schedule. The barn/equine manager routinely does weekday morning feeding, and so has the opportunity to do a daily visual inspection of each horse as she brings it in from night turn-out. Three staff members are responsible for providing basic horse care evenings and weekends, so that horses are routinely handled daily by a limited number of staff who are familiar with their appearance and normal behaviors and can report any deviations to the barn manager. Any significant changes in diet or hoof care are done in consultation with our vet and farrier, based either on their findings or upon changes that staff see in a horse's behavior, body condition, or soundness. Our care plan for each of our horses involves maintaining them in optimal condition and trying to be proactive in anticipating health issues as our equine population ages.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Euthanasia of a program-owned horse is only considered in the setting of escalating chronic health problems or a severe acute medical condition, and would be based on quality of life as well as safely issues for both the horse and the staff handling him, and taking into account the availability of financially feasible options to treat or improve the horse' s condition. The decision to euthanize would always be made in consultation with our vet and with the input of staff members as well. At no time would we consider euthanasia simply as a means of managing the number of horses in our program.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     N/A. We only take geldings into our program.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training? 
     N/A

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. 
     N/A

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     N/A

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: N/A



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program

1721 Blue Banks Farm Rd Greenville NC 27834

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Malaika Albrecht

2. Contact's Phone: 252-752-0153

3. Contact's Email: info@rhrnc.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 10.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 16

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. The facility consists of a 16 stall wooden barn located on 25 acres. Nine horses are stabled in one wing of the barn, which contains 10 stalls in total, in 12x12 windowed stalls with mats and pelleted bedding; there is an additional stall in another wing of the building. Of the remaining five stalls, one has been converted into an office, two are used as activity areas for students, and two are used for storage. Four multi-acre turn-out pastures behind the barn are planted with coastal bermuda grass, and have some shade from trees outside the fencing; one pasture has a run-in shed. There is also one very small dry lot turn-out area where we can keep a horse that needs to be off pasture because of dietary restrictions or temporary limitations on physical activity; and a second small dry lot has been constructed for the two miniature horses. All horses have correctly sized rain sheets and blankets available if needed; each stall has a fan set up in the summer when horses are inside during the heat of the day. During the summer of 2013, all of the aged wooden pasture fencing was replaced with 4 rail Ramm Flex Fence topped with electrobraid hotwire, and the wooden pasture gates were replaced with metal gates, thanks to coordinated grants from two local foundations.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Our climate allows for 24 hour turn-out most of the year, except in cases of extreme inclement weather. Horses are inside if scheduled for a block of lessons, or if weather is severe - this includes the 2 minis who occupy one of the extra stalls in the barn during those times. Turn-out for the horses is done in 3 groups, based on compatibility, and these groups are rotated every 2-4 weeks between the four 3-4 acre turn-out pastures. The small dry lot is used only when needed, especially in spring with ponies which may be prone to founder on lush grass. The 2 miniature horses have a separate dry lot for turn-out.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 20

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Four board wooden post/rail fencing completely encloses the area between the back of the barn and the front of the turn-out pastures; it is where the mounting and primary riding/lesson areas are located. This area, which is mainly grass, includes a lighted 70x200 dressage ring surrounded by a single rail fence with a gate at each end, where most lessons are conducted, as well as a large round pen used for at liberty training work. There is also a gated access to a very large fenced grass field that is also sometimes used for lessons and schooling rides by staff members. The footing of the riding ring and the round pen is dirt covered by screenings.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? No

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant.
     After reviewing their website, while we do follow many of their guidelines, there are several relative to rescue/rehabilitation that do not apply to our mission and program situation. Our mission focuses on providing equine related services to people with disabilities; our commitment to our horses is to provide them with the best possible care because they are the foundation of our program team. While we do at times take donated horses into our program, they are healthy, serviceable animals in need of neither rescue nor sanctuary. We believe that our membership in and compliance with standards of the organizations noted below (#8) is more in line with our mission and is sufficient to ensure that our horses receive the excellent care that they deserve.

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     For more than 20 years, Rocking Horse Ranch has chosen to be a member center of PATHIntl (formerly NARHA) because it is the organization that best fits our mission and we feel that their standards of equine management are most applicable to our program. We are currently in the midst of the process for PATHIntl premier accreditation. In addition, we are also in compliance with the care guidelines of the American Association of Equine Practitioners.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Because our horses are not routinely transported off our property (except for the minis, who have a specially modified van), we do not own a truck/trailer for horse transport. We do have access to borrowed transportation if this should ever be necessary and could quickly get a horse to our local vet clinic. However, we have made the determination that our program lacks the financial resources to send any of our horses to the state vet school in Raleigh, NC for a major health issue (ie surgery) so we work closely with our local vet to be proactive in the care of our horses and take care of minor health problems before they become serious. In 14 years of full time operation, we have had minimal emergency calls to our vet and have never had to take a horse to the local clinic for more intensive care. (Owners with horses on loan to the program have a written emergency care plan as part of their loan agreement, in case we cannot quickly reach them, including whether or not they want their horse transported to either the local clinic or the state vet school at their cost).

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     The barn/equine manager is responsible for maintaining a written list of saddles and surcingles that correctly fit each horse. Refitting of all saddles and surcingles is done twice a year in January and August, prior to the start of our spring and fall lesson sessions, and at any other time that an instructor might have a concern with the fit of a specific piece of tack. She also performs monthly tack checks; all instructors are responsible for checking tack they use and reporting any breakage to the equine manager so that repairs can be made promptly. Blankets / rain sheets are repaired if needed in the spring and re-fitted every fall.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     There is a description of each horse posted in the feed room. Lesson volunteers can reference the photo and description included on each horse's weekly tack assignment clipboard. Each horse has a nameplate on its stall door and has its own grooming bucket with attached photo hanging on its stall door. Each horse also has a nametag fastened to its halter, and its bridle and girth are kept on hooks in the tack room identified by name. In terms of identifying horses loose in the pastures, only staff members are allowed to turn out or bring in horses from their pastures; volunteers who help solely with barn chores do not routinely handle the horses, and any horses being used for lessons are already in their stalls prior to the arrival of lesson volunteers.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     We will not keep on premises more horses than we have stalls available. However, we believe that routine daily turnout, preferable in groups, is essential for the mental and physical well-being of our horses. Except in cases of extreme weather, horses are kept on 24 hour turnout throughout the year apart from when they are brought in for a block of lessons. No horse is kept in a stall without daily turnout except in cases of weather emergencies (ie, hurricanes) or when a medical issue mandates stall rest for a period of time.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     The dietary regimen for each horse is developed by our barn/equine manager in consultation with our vet and recorded on a feed chart in the feed room. Horses have access to pasture grazing daily and are fed timothy hay daily as well. All horses receive a twice daily ration based on grain, supplemented with beet pulp, and salt (also available free choice in turnout pastures and in each stall); we have 6 horses on SafeChoice Senior feed and 5 on SafeChoice Special Care. Amounts of hay and feed are adjusted based on visual inspection and, at minimum, a spring and fall body condition score and weight tape measurement. Unless recommended by our vet, horses are generally not on additional supplements.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Body scoring and weight tape measurements are recorded at least twice a year by our barn/equine manager to document the condition of each horse relative to their feed allotment and work/exercise schedule. Individual adjustments in diet and exercise are made based on these results relative to changes from past scores for each horse. We also use these results to help determine rider weight limits for each horse.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Manure management consists of daily stall cleaning; manure is spread using a mechanical spreader every 2-3 days in a field removed from turnout pastures and other facility activities. Turnout pastures are dragged as soon as horses are rotated out of a pasture to spread out manure and minimize re-ingestion of parasites. In consultation with our vet, we have tried a variety of fly control measures inside the barn - what has worked best over time is a combination of keeping access into the barn limited (stall windows have screens and barn doors are kept semi-closed, keeping interior shaded when there are no activities being conducted), and being meticulous about daily manure and debris removal in stalls and barn aisles. In 15 years at this facility, we have only euthanized two horses, which were buried in the pasture used for manure spreading, where no other facility activities take place. In terms of spread of disease, we feel there is slight risk of transmissible disease coming into our herd, as there are no other horses nearby, our horses do not routinely travel off the property to other equine venues, and we infrequently bring a horse in on trial. However, all of our horses receive all recommended vaccines on a schedule determined by our vet.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     These issues are addressed in our risk management plan. We keep horses inside the barn during hazardous weather (typically hurricanes or severe thunderstorms). There is emergency contact information posted by the phone in our common area for volunteers and clients. There is a smoke detector placed in the upper loft areas at each end of the barn and 5 fire extinguishers are located throughout the barn. There is an evacuation procedure for staff to follow in case of fire, first making sure that all clients and volunteers are evacuated to a specific location and then designating the senior staff person on site to determine if an attempt can be made by staff to safely remove any horses from inside the barn.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     There is one designated exterior entrance to the waiting room for volunteers and clients, which is kept locked when lessons are not in session. There is "no trespassing" signage posted at all other entrances to the facility that are accessible from the driveway, and warning signage posted at intervals on the turnout pasture fencing. There is not a security system on the premises. There is no on-site caretaker; however, there is a rental apartment above the barn, so there is often a tenant present at night and on weekends when staff is not usually at the barn - and we are very particular in choosing our tenants.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Michelle Whaley, Pitt County Animal Control, 4550 County Home Rd, Greenville, NC 27834 252-329-4387 (no email address)

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     N/A


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 01/26/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Linda Balot

Clinic Name: Greenville Mobile Equine Service    Street: 3203 Quail Pointe Dr    City: Greenville  State: NC    Zip: 27858

Phone: 252-353-6111    Email: gmesvet@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Amber Decker

     2. Instructor: Ashlyn Batten

     3. Instructor: Carolyn Shultzaberger

     4. Instructor: Cheryl Meola

     5. Instructor: Kristina Cudney

     6. Instructor: Malaika Albrecht

     7. Instructor: Rachael Moore

     8. Instructor: Sandra Rogers

     9. Instructor: Sherri Moore

     10. Instructor: Tracy Parham


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 11.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 11

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 12

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Our vet typically does dental care as needed, so there we do not keep a separate line item for equine dentistry. Barn staff is responsible for stall cleaning / manure removal into a spreader, which is run as needed by the barn/equine manager as part of her job duties. The barn/equine manager is our only full time employee, and her time is about equally divided between horse care/training/conditioning and teaching TR lessons, so the amount listed for 3-j represents about 50% of here total salary. Our part-time maintenance person is responsible for pasture fence upkeep as well as mowing/dragging pastures and many other tasks that do not relate directly to horse care, so this is just a rough estimate as well.

10 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 2 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

12 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 1 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

1 = Total of 2d-2f

11 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            11 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$7298     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$2500     Bedding.

$3350     Veterinarian.

$4240     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$650     Medications & Supplements.

$422     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$8252     Horse Care Staff.

$12000     Horse Training.

$2000     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$40712     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

3560     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $11
Question 3 ($40,712 ) divided by Question 4 (3560).

Average length of stay for an equine: 297 days
Question 4 (3560) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (12).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses?

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? Some of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 129

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 30

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 32

4. What is the average wait list time? 2 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 3.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 4

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 4

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 95%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Amber Decker

         *Facility Participation:

         Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered therapeutic riding instructor


     2. *Instructor: Ashlyn Batten

         *Facility Participation:

         Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered therapeutic riding instructor

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Volunteer coordinator


     3. *Instructor: Carolyn Shultzaberger

         *Facility Participation:

         Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2004

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered therapeutic riding instructor

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. This instructor is in the process of becoming certified as a PATHIntl mentor.


     4. *Instructor: Cheryl Meola

         *Facility Participation:

         Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2004

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered therapeutic riding instructor

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. This instructor also has a MEd degree and is a licensed professional counselor. She is one of our lead instructors in our equine assisted mental health and learning programs.


     5. *Instructor: Kristina Cudney

         *Facility Participation:

         Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2005

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered therapeutic riding instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine specialist in mental health and learning

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. This instructor is also a licensed recreational therapist and CTRS. She also serves as our educational coordinator, supervising the students from East Carolina University who do internships or practicum hours at Rocking Horse Ranch to satisfy educational requirements for their degree programs in child development/family relations, rehabilitation studies, social work, or recreational therapy. As a member of the faculty at Pitt Community College, she also supervises students from the Recreational Therapy Assistant program who perform practicum hours at Rocking Horse Ranch.


     6. *Instructor: Malaika Albrecht

         *Facility Participation:

         Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered therapeutic riding instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2103

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. This instructor is also a licensed clinical social worker and is also a certified equine massage and Reiki practitioner. She became Executive Director of Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program, Inc. on July 1, 2104.


     7. *Instructor: Rachael Moore

         *Facility Participation:

         Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered therapeutic riding instructor


     8. *Instructor: Sandra Rogers

         *Facility Participation:

         Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2003

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered therapeutic riding instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine specialist in mental health and learning


     9. *Instructor: Sherri Moore

         *Facility Participation:

         Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2008

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered therapeutic riding instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.interactive vaulting instructor

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. This instructor is the program's only full time employee, working as both the barn/equine manager and as a part-time TR and vaulting instructor


     10. *Instructor: Tracy Parham

         *Facility Participation:

         Rocking Horse Ranch Therapeutic Riding Program

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATHIntl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1997

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered therapeutic riding instructor