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Nickers N' Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center aka Stoneybrook Foundation

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/26/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Karen H. McCalpin

Employees:   Full-Time:  4  Part-Time:  3  Volunteers:  45

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Once employees are hired, they are given a job description, written policies and procedures, and a written employee manual. Employees are then trained on operations, general policies and procedures, and on their specific job. For certain jobs, demonstration of skills and obtaining credentials is required. Employees are evaluated with a yearly performance review. Volunteers are also given a written policies and procedures manual. Like with employees, they must practice, and demonstrate their skills to be able to volunteer in certain positions. Annual training opportunities are provided by the organization for both staff and volunteers.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  6

Number of Board Members:  9  Number of Voting Board Members:  5

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member. Two founding members of our organization, John and Debbie McCain are married and are ex-officio members ofboard of directors. Their daughter, Lin Podolinsky, is Vice President of the board.

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Nickers 'N Neighs therapeutic riding riding programs encompass therapy; education; sports; recreation; and leisure. Services are offered to adults and children in a 4 county area. We also provide specialized services to area veterans. Our current student population covers a wide range of disabilities, including but not limited to paraplegia; autism spectrum disorder; Down Syndrome; spina bifida; pervasive development disorder; non-verbal disorders; visual and hearing impairment; developmental and learning disabilities; at risk youth; persons experiencing abuse; cerebral palsy; and muscular dystrophy. We have a mini that we take to offsite events in the community. "Speckles" is able to go inside buildings wearing special sneakers and her therapy vest." We currently have a waiting list of 77. We are a Premier Accredited Center of PATH, Int. (Professional Association of Therapeutic Riding, Int.)

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. Not applicable.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Currently, we have 13 horses of varying ages and sizes. We have written policies for: 1.) criteria for selection; 2.) equine management; 3.) lameness and removal; 4.) overall health; 5.)breeding; process for selection; 5.) euthanasia; 6.) usage statistics; 7.) individual horse work schedules 8.) risk management.
Each horse has a stall card with their name and story. Two dry erase boards are maintained in the barn. One board defines turnout times for each horse; work times for each horse and by whom; and any changes to feeding schedules. The other board lists the students; times; instructors; horses; and volunteers for each day's sessions. A bulletin board is used to tack up any notes to staff regarding any special situations; farrier; vet dates, etc. A feed chart by horse is kept current in the feed room. along with any supplements being administered. Medications are in a locked storage area only accessible to staff. A blanketing chart is also maintained and well as all medical records for all horses. We have 6 separate pastures and when therapy horses are not scheduled for lessons, they are outside with the exception of severe weather. Three part-time staff are employed for feeding; turn out; stalling cleaning; bucket scrubbing; watering; and returning horses from pasture. The pastures are equipped with automatic waterers.All staff, including the Director pitch in with barn work as needed or necessary. We also have a group of volunteers who clean tack, wash bits buckets, move sawdust; etc. All horses are on a regular fecal exam schedule and receive worming appropriate to the results. All horses receive spring and fall vaccines and routine dental and farrier care.
We are in the process of adding 4 additional stalls with the help of grant as well as building an accessible tack room. When both are completed we will have 5 additional stalls. We would like to add two additional horses to our therapy herd.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Horses are acquired for our program from a variety of sources. While some of them are purchased by the center, others are donated to our program by their owners. Currently, over half of the horses working in our therapeutic riding program are owned by private individuals are leased to our facility for use in lessons. This situation is beneficial for both the horse owner and our center; we have access to well-educated horses that may otherwise be too expensive for our organization to purchase, and the horse’s owner can be assured that their horse will continue to receive regular exercise and care in their absence. Before acceptance, a horse must be examined by our veterinarian for overall health status and undergo a conformation and soundness analysis. Horses are generally accepted for a trial period before acceptance and a written agreement is executed and signed by both the lessor or seller and the NNNTRC.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     All horses will be checked for soundness prior to their use in a lesson. It is the policy of Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center to conduct a warm-up session (in-hand, lunging, and/or mounted) with each horse at least 30 minutes prior to the start of their lesson, and a soundness check is performed at this time. Any horse that is deemed unsound is temporarily removed from the lesson program until further investigation of the lameness can be conducted. All lameness and subsequent layoff and treatment will be documented in the daily exercise log. The owner of any horse that is leased to Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center will be contacted after demonstrating a recurring lameness for five (5) consecutive days. All communication between Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center and the horse owner will be documented in the horse’s file. Discussion with the owner will focus on continued treatment of the lameness, treatment by a veterinarian (cost to be covered in the lease contract), the subsequent care of the horse during treatment, and possible permanent removal of the horse from the program. Horses owned by Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center that consistently demonstrate the same lameness symptoms are examined and treated by a veterinarian. Ongoing care and the future prognosis for the horse are discussed during the examination. Treatment options are also discussed including, but not limited to, temporary or permanent changes to the horse’s workload to ease discomfort. If the quality of life for the horse is in question, Nickers ‘N Neighs willdiscuss with a veterinarian the humane euthanasia of the horse. This decision will be made based on the recommendations of the veterinarian and knowledge of the staff of Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center. Horses that are unable to perform comfortably as therapeutic riding horses will be permanently removed from the riding program. A horse that fits these circumstances will be placed in another facility separate from Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center. Leased horses must be removed from the property within 15 days. Every attempt will be made by the staff and management of Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center to find suitable retirement or semi-retirement homes for horses owned by the facility that are no longer physically able to perform the work necessary of a therapeutic riding horse. The center is able to place horses at the home of a staff member or volunteer until a suitable permanent arrangement can be made for the horse. These horses will be placed with individuals who are aware of any and all limitations the horse may have and are capable of properly caring for the horse in all aspects (i.e. skill level, financially, etc.) Horses will not be sold at auction or for slaughter under any circumstances.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Criteria for the selection of a therapy horse

Soundness
o This is a very broad category. A horse selected for our program must be free from obvious conformation and gait anomalies that would prohibit him or her from participating in a sustained training and work program.
o The horse must pass a veterinary exam from a vet of our choosing before being accepted. This exam includes a conformation and lameness analysis, as well as a comprehensive assessment of the overall health of the horse. The veterinarian will provide information regarding any current health or soundness issues and outline a maintenance program for the horse.

Character
o Horses accepted into our program must possess a friendly, personable personality. We recognize that horses possess individual personalities and their attitude toward their surroundings can fluctuate depending on their health, soundness, instinctive behavior, etc. This could affect the outward expression of a horse's character at any given time.
o Horses that excel in our program are patient, social animals who enjoy contact with people. They are bright horses who enjoy consistent work and interaction with humans.

Background
o Therapy horses come from a variety of backgrounds and training programs. Their current level of training is significant, since it is an indication of the horse's soundness and trainability. Current schooling is less important than solid basic training and the character to build on those skills. Horses must exhibit good ground manners, basic obedience under saddle, and a desire to work for their rider. These traits allow a horse to be developed further with consistent training.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center employs a comprehensive health care regimen for the horses that work in our program. Our health care philosophy is grounded in the most natural care of the horse possible, and we incorporate this idea into every area of our horses’ care. The horses at our facility receive 24 hour turnout that is limited only by potentially dangerous or uncomfortable weather conditions. Each horse comes in every day to be groomed and checked by the staff whether they are working that day or not. Our horses are handled twice each day, since they must be led into the barn for their morning and evening meals. Staff members and volunteers assessing the horses make note of any changes in behavior or movement and notify the manager to address the situation. Any horse exhibiting signs of lameness, illness, or abnormal behavior is removed from the work schedule until their condition can be evaluated. An individual feeding program is planned for each horse by the Barn Manager in consultation with our veterinarian. The basis of our feeding program is top-quality grass hay that is fed a minimum of four times per day when the horses are indoors and free-choice as necessary when they are out. Horses that benefit from grass are pastured on grazing fields that contain a mixture of grasses, while those with metabolic issues are kept in a dry lot. The horses that require additional calories have ration balancer and/or a pelleted feed added to their diet. We consider our feeding program to be one of the basic aspects of our health care system, since feeding a forage-based diet that allows them to eat small quantities most of the day limits and prevents many major health and behavior issues. The horses at Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center receive three regular veterinary examinations each year; two in the spring and one in the fall. These coincide with our vaccination schedule, which is as follows: all horses at the center receive Flu/Rhino, EWT, Rabies, PHF, WNV, and Strangles vaccinations given in two visits each spring and Flu/Rhino booster in the fall. Our horses also receive a visit from the equine dentist in the spring. We de-worm our horses four times per year based on the recommendation of our veterinarian. Currently, our horses receive Ivermectin in March and September and Pyrantel Pamoate in June and December. We conduct yearly fecal exams to evaluate the effectiveness of our de-worming program. Although none of our horses would be considered at-risk, we make every attempt to identify and treat individual issues for our horses. Many of our management practices prevent or minimize problems for our horses. Our horses live an active life with regular exercise, generous turnout, and schedules designed to keep them physically and mentally healthy. We work with our veterinarian, equine dentist, and farrier to address specific issues such as chronic lameness, arthritis, weight problems, etc. In addition, our horses receive massage therapy, acupuncture, and chiropractic treatment when it is prescribed by our veterinarian. Horses that have serious or chronic issues requiring long-term care are generally not serviceably sound enough to meet the criteria for our program and are removed per our organization’s guidelines.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Euthanasia Policy It is the policy of Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center to provide exceptional care for the horses at our facility. Euthanasia is, unfortunately, sometimes the only viable option for a horse that is no longer serviceably sound or healthy. Our veterinarian assists us in weighing options for each horse in the event of an illness or injury, and euthanasia may be recommended if the veterinarian determines that it is in the best interest of the horse based on their medical condition and prognosis. Horses may be euthanized for conditions including, but not limited to, the following: severe colic, severe lameness, illness, or injury with poor prognosis for rehabilitation, complications due to old age, severe, debilitating laminitis and failure to thrive as a result of an existing medical condition with no hope of recovery. Since the criteria that we use to determine the compatibility of a horse for our program is very strict and inclusive, a horse that may be deemed too ‘difficult’ for use in our program is often happily re-homed into a different career. It is the policy of Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center that any horse determined to be unsuitable for our programs due to behavior or temperament reasons will not be euthanized. The horse will be marketed or adopted into a different home that is aware of any and all issues with the horse. If it is not possible to keep the horse on the premises for the safety of our students, these horses will be kept at a facility separate from Nickers ‘N Neighs until a suitable home can be found for them.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     Breeding Policy Nickers ‘N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center does not participate in the breeding, raising and training of horses for profit. The mares owned by the facility will never be bred; it is far more beneficial for our program and the equine community at large to purchase or adopt horses that are suitable for our students. We do not allow stallions over the age of 6 months on the premises regardless of ownership, and there are no exceptions to this policy. Since some of the horses in our program are owned by private individuals, they may choose to breed their mare at their discretion. Currently, our facility is home to one such mare, and she foaled in May, 2014. Her owners provide all prenatal care for her and are allowing our students the opportunity to experience a horse’s pregnancy, birth, and early training. The owners of this mare intend to keep the resulting foal as a personal riding horse and possibly an addition to our program. If a mare is purchased for our program and it is determined after the purchase that she in foal, she will be allowed to foal at a separate facility and will rejoin our program after weaning her foal. The foal will be offered for sale or adoption to a suitable home after weaning. Nickers ‘N Neighs believes that the nurturing a foal receives from its dam is important to its well-being, and recommends foals be weaned at a minimum of 5-6 months of age. Nickers ‘N Neighs does not currently have a no-breeding clause in any sale or rehoming documentation.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     Yes

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     Horses are placed only at the facilities of staff or volunteers. All volunteers are carefully vetted and both staff and volunteers must provide state and federal criminal clearances.

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Nickers 'N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center

260 Mountain Trails Ln Acme PA 15610

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Karen McCalpin

2. Contact's Phone: 724-613-3312

3. Contact's Email: karen@kidsonhorses.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: John McCain
944 Stoneybrook Circle
Ligonier, Pa 15658

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     The five year lease began on November 1, 2012 and ends on October 31, 2017. After the end of this lease, our organization plans to renew the lease, and collaboratively is looking into transfer of ownership of the property from the individual to our organization.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     Not applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 4.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 26

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. 4 turnout areas of approximately 2.5 acres each, one turnout area of approximately 2 acres, one dry lot of approximately 1.5 acres. All fields are fenced with wooden posts and 2 inch electric tape power by solar units. All turnouts are equipped with auto waterers. The entire facility encompasses 55 acres. Future plans include fencing additional turn outs as funding is available. Our facility includes an 18 stall barn; tack room; feed room; equipment room; 60 x80 indoor arena; large hay storage building and a modular home. With funding from a local foundation, we are constructing a 10 x 50 ADA compliant tack room and adding 4 stalls.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     The horses at our facility receive 24 hour turnout that is limited only by potentially dangerous or uncomfortable weather conditions or work schedule. Each horse comes in every day to be groomed and checked by the staff whether they are working that day or not. Our horses are handled twice each day, since they must be led into the barn for their morning and evening meals. Staff members and volunteers assessing the horses make note of any changes in behavior or movement and notify the manager to address the situation. Any horse exhibiting signs of lameness, illness, or abnormal behavior is removed from the work schedule until their condition can be evaluated.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 12

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Most training activities and lessons take place in a 60 x 80 indoor arena. The arena footing is sand and peat moss, with magnesium flakes added for dust control. The arena is treated and dragged regularly to prevent packing. Some training and conditioning take place on rolling hills in a field adjacent to the barn. This area is used when footing is suitable and safe.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, Int. http://www.pathintl.org/path-intl-centers/path-intl-center-accreditation

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Truck and trailer are available 24/7.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     The facility engages the regular services of a certified saddle fitter to ensure that all tack fits correctly. Staff members regularly check the fitting of each horse’s tack, blankets, halters, etc. and communicate any potential or possible issues.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Each horse’s name and photo is prominently displayed on their stall. Turnout assignments are listed on a dry erase field chart. Volunteers work with staff members when turning horses in and out.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Our horses receive as much turnout as possible. When weather is inclement, they are turned out in small groups in our indoor arena for exercise. Any horse on stall rest is hand walked (under the guidance of our veterinarian).

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     An individual feeding program is planned for each horse by the Barn Manager in consultation with our veterinarian. The basis of our feeding program is top-quality grass hay that is fed a minimum of four times per day when the horses are indoors and free-choice as necessary when they are out. Horses that benefit from grass are pastured on grazing fields that contain a mixture of grasses, while those with metabolic issues are kept in a dry lot. The horses that require additional calories have ration balancer and/or a pelleted feed added to their diet. We consider our feeding program to be one of the basic aspects of our health care system, since feeding a forage-based diet that allows them to eat small quantities most of the day limits and prevents many major health and behavioral issues.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Our veterinarian assigns each of our horses a body condition score during their yearly exam. Each horse’s feeding and turnout plan is adjusted accordingly. Some may have their hay soaked or be removed from grass fields, others may have additional calories added to their diets. Exercise is a key component of managing each horse’s condition. Individual exercise programs for each horse are also adjusted; for example, we may add an additional exercises riding or lunging session to the horse’s schedule to assist with weight loss or add light hill work to aid in developing muscle along their toppling. horses are monitored throughout the year.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Our manure management plan was written with the assistance of Penn State University Cooperative Extension, and meets all state regulations. Manure is stored in a compost pile away from where horses are housed, and is allowed to compost before it is spread on an adjacent field. Horses are dewormed twice per year, and receive regular fecal exams to determine their individual parasite level. Those who carry higher parasite loads may receive a stronger deworming medication under the supervision of our veterinarian. These horses are stalled for 24 hours following deworming to minimize infection of other horses. Whenever possible, we transport horses to a local veterinary clinic for euthanasia and disposal. This clinic also contracts with an individual to remove deceased horses. It is against Pennsylvania state law to bury a horse on our property. New horses entering the property are quarantined for a minimum of 14 days. During this time, horses cannot touch existing herd members, and staff takes precautions to limit the spread of germs among horses being handled. Horses must have current vaccinations consistent with our program and a current negative Coggins to move to the property.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Emergency exit plans are posted in various areas throughout the barn and office. For inclement weather, horses are housed in the barn to limit exposure to lightning and wind. In accordance with the Westmoreland County Fire Marshall, our fire safety plan includes opening stall doors for any horses indoors (ONLY IF it is safe to do so) and meeting in an area across the parking lot. Any loose horses can then be captured and be housed in fields located away from the barn

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The facility is equipped with cameras and a Rampart Security alarm system and the Operations Manager and her husband live on the property. No members of the public are permitted in the barn without the presence of staff as well as a signed waiver. when no staff or present the access doors to the barn are locked.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Westmoreland County Humane Society 1152 RT 119N Greensburg,PA 15601 724-689-9468 hswcgbg@aol.com

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Our Executive Director is a member of the board of directors of The Cloud Foundation 107 S. 7th Street Colorado Springs, CO 80905 719-633-3842 info@thecloudfoundation She is also the owner of two kill pen rescues and actively uses her social media page to speak out against horse slaughter.


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/25/2017

Veterinarian: Alexis Baney

Clinic Name: Allegheny Equine Associates    Street: 5015 Sampson Drive    City: Murraysville  State: PA    Zip: 15668

Phone: 724-325-4615    Email: office@alleghenyequine.net


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Amanda Erett

     2. Instructor: Becky Kostley

     3. Instructor: Kayla Umbaugh

     4. Instructor: Kimberly Reynolds


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 13.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 15

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 17

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Almost all staff, regardless of title, are involved in horse care (stall cleaning; feeding; watering; turn out, bring in; grooming; exercise) Two rescued horses are bordered by the Executive Director and not used for any EAT activities at this time.

14 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 3 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

17 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 4 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

4 = Total of 2d-2f

13 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            13 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$12227     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$1800     Bedding.

$8742     Veterinarian.

$4425     Farrier.

$690     Dentist.

$80     Manure Removal.

$2600     Medications & Supplements.

$2000     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$17783     Horse Care Staff.

$3800     Horse Training.

$2260     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$56407     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

4745     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $12
Question 3 ($56,407 ) divided by Question 4 (4745).

Average length of stay for an equine: 279 days
Question 4 (4745) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (17).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses?

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Half of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? Not at all

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Less often than weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 105

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 50

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 52

4. What is the average wait list time? 16 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 3.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 4

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 4

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 90%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed. Some students ride bi-weekly.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Amanda Erett

         *Facility Participation:

         Nickers 'N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Amanda is working on completing her hours to qualify for testing for PATH Registered Instructor.


     2. *Instructor: Becky Kostley

         *Facility Participation:

         Nickers 'N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Becky has almost completed her required hours to qualify for the Path Registered Instructor test.


     3. *Instructor: Kayla Umbaugh

         *Facility Participation:

         Nickers 'N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Level Instructor


     4. *Instructor: Kimberly Reynolds

         *Facility Participation:

         Nickers 'N Neighs Therapeutic Riding Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2017

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Advanced