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Brook Hill Farm

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/26/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Jo Anne Miller - Executive Director

Employees:   Full-Time:  3  Part-Time:  1  Volunteers:  714

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Executive Director: To provide operational leadership, expertise, and knowledge required to sustain its mission of rehabilitation focused rescue services and a safe haven for unwanted horses while maintaining a unique opportunity for personal growth and equine education for area youth and adults.

Responsibilities:
1. Management and General
Hiring, Firing and oversight of staff and volunteers in charge of all internal operations of the agency such as financial controls, accounting, adherence to legal requirements and reports, payroll, staff supervision, strategic planning, technology development , and risk management.
2. Volunteer Management
Oversight of staff and volunteers, responsible for the implementation of all volunteer recruitment, recognition, training, and dismissal procedures which will utilize the skills and expertise of volunteers in the most effective manner possible for all aspects of the non-profit.
3. Program Management
Oversight of staff and volunteers responsible for the development and implementation of all programs approved by the board
4. Community Involvement
Oversight of volunteer or staff responsible for all aspects of community involvement and community collaboration
5. Marketing
Oversight of staff or volunteers responsible for the development and implementation of a year round marketing plan, publicity campaigns and all aspects of building brand identity and positive public relations
6. Resource Development
Oversight of volunteers or staff involved in all aspects of resource development of fundraising: to include grants and foundations, donor base, pledges, sponsorships, and the establishment of an endowment.
Profile: The Executive Director must have a love of horses and children. A bachelor’s degree with 5 years executive level management, child development and special education background, and knowledge of financial management, fundraising, and organizational skills. Must be a Registered Instructor with PATH International and hold a certification as an Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning.

Evaluations: Evaluations are done on a 6 month rotation by a board selected committee

Assistant Director: Assists the Executive Director in sustaining Brook Hill Farms mission, philosophy, strategy, objectives and annual goals. required to sustain its mission of rehabilitation focused rescue services and a safe haven for unwanted horses while maintaining a unique opportunity for personal growth and equine education for area youth and adults.
Responsibilities:
1. Assist with Administrative duties to include:
Volunteer development
Programs
Community Involvement
Resource Development
2. Preform Secretarial Duties to include correspondence, etc.
3. Maintain all records, policies, and forms for both horses and people.
4. Maintain website and other technological forms of marketing
5. Is in charge in absence of the Executive Director
Profile: A love and knowledge of horses and children is a must. A Bachelor’s degree and 5 years’ experience to include an emphasis on business, web design, record keeping, secretarial and organizational skills. A Center Administrator of PATH International a must.

Evaluations: Evaluations are done on a 6 month rotation by a board selected committee

Volunteers: To aid the farm in the mission, philosophy, and to participate in the actual work required to sustain its mission of rehabilitation focused rescue services and a safe haven for unwanted horses while maintaining a unique opportunity for personal growth and equine education for area youth and adults.

Volunteers and Training:
1. Volunteers fill out a volunteer application complete with references, health history, and experience
2. Volunteers must attend a volunteer orientation and a Volunteer Training session
3. Volunteers are assigned designated days and jobs for volunteering
4. Volunteers participate in a Mentor program, allowing them to advance in their skills in working with horses
5. Volunteers take part in our educational program, as part of our mission

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  12

Number of Board Members:  12  Number of Voting Board Members:  9

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member. Leslie Graham - Board Chairman (Daughter)
JoAnne Cole - Vice Chairman (Mother)

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member, and the name of the related organization. Executive Director owns the facility at which organization operates.

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     1) Horse Rescue, Rehabilitation, and Retirement
Accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries, horses that are no longer useful and/or injured that have been relinquished or seized are evaluated by our staff of knowledgeable professionals. The horses are put into a rehabilitation program carried out by college interns,volunteers, and United Neigh members. Once healed, the horse is available for placement in a life-time free lease agreement with a carefully screened applicant or used in our United Neigh program. 25 to 35 horses are kept on the property at any one time; the total number of horses served in any year fluctuates based on recovery time and placement. Horses that are not placed retire permanently at the farm and are used in our Equine Assisted Activities.

2) Equine Facilitated Learning
As a member of PATH International, Brook Hill offers professional Equine Facilitated Learning to youth and adults. This program offers many different activities involving the horse as a partner, either under saddle or on the ground, aiding the farm with its mission of rehabilitating unwanted horses. The EFL learning process is planned and guided, with the goal being to increase the participant’s social competence and positive behavior. Horses are congruent; they provide immediate meaningful feedback of non-verbal behavior. In an EFL setting, the participants attempt to manage and direct their own behavior to evoke desirable responses from the horse. The participants learn to recognize and give non-verbal communication cues to their horses through pressure, release and posture. This process allows the participants and facilitators to reflect on their behavior and the horse’s response through thoughts, feelings and communication skills and then apply these skills to a human partner. The program is set up to improve self and social awareness, personal responsibility, goal directed behavior, self-management, communication skills, and positive behavior. We have on staff an Educator and a Licensed Registered Riding Instructor and an Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning overseeing these programs.

3) United Neigh:
United Neigh is an innovative program created to aid the farm in its mission of rehabilitation of unwanted horses for at-risk youth ages 12-18. As a United States Pony Club Center, United Neigh uses the Pony Club curriculum to teach riding and horse knowledge. Led by adults and college interns, the program teaches its members basic horse care, horse rehabilitation, riding skills and personal accountability with the goal of decreasing the high school drop–out rate. The National Education Association’s Twelve Point Plan for Reducing the School Dropout Rate pinpoints “community-based, real-world learning experiences for students” and involvement in small after school groups as a key factor in increasing the rate of high school graduation. The farm’s unique program utilizes equine facilitated learning to provide just such an experience for at-risk youth in the Central Virginia area.

4) Rockin' Riders:

Rockin' Riders is a traditional therapeutic riding program individuals with physical and mental disabilities that can experience the rewarding benefits of horseback riding. A disability does not have to limit a person from riding horses. In fact, experiencing the motion of a horse can be very therapeutic. Because horseback riding rhythmically moves the rider's body in a manner similar to a human gait, riders with physical disabilities often show improvement in flexibility, balance and muscle strength. Therapeutic riding uses equine-assisted activities for the purpose of contributing positively to cognitive, physical, emotional and social well-being of people with disabilities. It provides benefits in the areas of health, education, sport and recreation & leisure. In addition to the therapeutic benefits, horseback riding also provides recreational opportunities for individuals with disabilities to enjoy the outdoors. This program is open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, or marital or family status.

5) College Interns
Educational opportunities in collaboration with regional schools including Virginia Tech are provided for college students to participate in internships aiding the farm in its mission of rehabilitating unwanted horses, earning them college credit in the following fields: Animal Sciences, Animal Psychology, Biology, Education, Special Education, Business, Communications, and Pre-Vet Studies. Brook Hill Farm is partnering with Randolph college to teach the class, "Introduction to Equine Assisted Therapies".

6) Seniors Helping Seniors
This program just began in January 2017 for senior citizens. It will be classified as a therapeutic riding class that was created to help support the horses in sanctuary at the farm. The participants will help to care for the horses in sanctuary , will ride if appropriate, and financially help to support this population.

6) Community Outreach
Brook Hill Farm partners with existing programs such as the Salvation Army, Alliance for Children, Boy and Girl Scouts, Church groups, School Groups and others to provide a hands-on one day educational program in basic horse care and knowledge that creates community awareness of the plight of the horse that is no longer useful. In 2017 we hope to begin a summer camp program.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. None

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     At Brook Hill Farm, we do rescue right. Fully accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries, and by the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance, all of the horses in our program are worked with each day, based on a rehabilitation plan created by the Veterinarian and staff, and is carried out by staff, college interns,volunteers, and United Neigh members. Horses accepted into the program come in all conditions: from starvation cases to lameness issues. A total number of 25 to 35 horses are kept on the property at any one time; the total number of horses served in any year fluctuates based on recovery time and placement. Horses that have long-term issues or are not able to be placed in a free lease home are used in our PATH International Equine Assisted Activities Programs. Below is a sample of our rehabilitation plan, put together for each horse on the property.

General Information
Barn Name:
Registered Name:
Date of Arrival:
Breed: Date of Birth: Sex: Color:
ID # Height: Weight: BCS:
Temperature: Pulse: Respiration:

Previous Job:
Medical Issue:

Diagnosis Date:

Rehabilitation Plan
Record of Physical Therapy – Record observations

Date Day Activity Pulse Resp.
This section can be lengthy
Form Filled out by:

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Brook Hill Farm is the official Animal Shelter for horses for Bedford County, handling all horses that are seized by animal control. This service is offered to surrounding counties when space is available. All of our horses come to us through seizure, owner surrender or donation. We provide Services to horses all over the nation when we have openings. We focus on accepting lame horses through donation, hoping to help reduce their numbers at sales where they do not stand much of a chance of being purchased by loving homes.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     All of our horses have a purpose. Those that are rehabilitated and can resume their previous career in a free lease home, while some of those who are retired and work in an Equine Facilitated Learning programs here at the farm. Others are provided sanctuary to live out their retirement, and are handled daily by our volunteers and staff. All of our horses enjoy people and having a job! For example, our oldest members are used to teach basic grooming to our new volunteers!

Once a horse is donated or released to Brook Hill Farm, the farm retains ownership of the animal throughout its natural life. The farm has a lifetime free lease application where the horse may leave the property and live at another approved site. An application is filled out by potential leasers, and references (especially the Veterinarian, as they are brutally honest with the placement home) are checked. These horses are checked on, and may return to the farm at any time. To recruit potential adopters we use word of mouth, our website, and work together with other equine rescue organizations to find the proper placement. To date the farm has placed 452 horses in life-time free lease homes! Below is a sample of our Policy:

Free Lease Program Information
The Free Lease Program:
Care is needed for many of the horses donated to Brook Hill Farm. The goal of the farm is to place horses within a lifetime lease. If the horse is no able to be cared for, we require that the horse be returned to the farm, and not be bought, sold, traded, bred, or raced. An agreement must be signed with the farm. These responsibilities include:
* All of the expenses incurred by the horse
* Annual shots, worming and hoof care
* All other health care needed
* Liability for the horse for any property damage, accident or injury that the horse may cause to the foster family or others.
* A 60 day notice must be given to the farm before the horse is returned. During this time the leaser is still responsible for the liability and health care of the horse
* When the horse is returned a $500.00 donation is requested to cover the expense the farm will incur in providing care for the horse upon its return.
* The farm is to be consulted if the horse is to change locations. The farm will contact the leaser and/or the leaser’s Veterinarian once a year to check in.
* Horses may not be used for breeding.
* Brook Hill Farm reserves the right to remove the horse if these requirements are not met.

The process to Free Lease a horse is:
* A visit to Brook Hill Farm is required.
* A Free-Lease application is to be completed. We encourage individuals to turn in an application as we can contact you if a horse should become available that would fit your needs.
* References listed by the applicant will be checked.
* The facility where the horse will be stabled is checked.
* An appropriate match is suggested and tried.
* The horse must pass a vet, farrier, trainer and administrator evaluation before it is released.
* The committee votes on the application.
* The horse is signed over to the leaser.
* Any transportation costs are the responsibility of the leaser.

Free Lease Program Application
(Please include has much information as possible describing training, experience and the type of horse you are interested in. You may right on the back as needed.)
Name: ___________________________________ Date: ________________
Address: ______________________________________________________________________
Resident: X City County (Check one) County of Residence:
Phone Number: ______________________________________________________________________
E-Mail Address: ______________________________________________________________________
References: (please list two)
Name: ________________________________ Phone:_____________ Relationship:_________________
Name: ________________________________ Phone:_____________ Relationship:_________________
Horse Experience: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Do you own a horse now? (If yes please describe) ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Type of horse wanted: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
What you plan to use horse for? __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Where you plan to keep horse? ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Will the horse be kept by itself? ______________________________________________________________________
Veterinarian:________________________________________________________
Farrier: ______________________________________________________________________

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Below is a copy of our initial assessment form and health records required and filled out by a Veterinarian and Staff member upon the arrival of the horse.

General Information
Barn Name:
Registered Name:
Date of Arrival:
Breed: Date of Birth: Sex: Color:
ID # Height: Weight: BCS:
Temperature: Pulse: Respiration:

Arrival Shot Records (Please supply most recent information)
* Rhino Flu Date
* Tetanus Date:
* Eastern Western Encephalitis Date:
* West Nile Date:
* Rabies Date:
* Strangles Date:
* Potomac Horse Fever Date:
* Coggins Date
* Worming Dates and Products:
Previous Discipline/Job:
Reason for Donation / Return:
Medications/Medical Issues:
Feed:
Arrival Condition:
Under Saddle
Ground Manners
Concerns: Recommendations: (Does this horse require Quarantine?)
Attending Vet:

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Every horse on property has a loose leaf notebook with all of their information. Included in that notebook is their intake sheet (see above), their rehabilitation plan (see above), a feeding schedule, and a daily log filled out by everyone who has contact with the horse. All of our animals are at-risk, as they come either from a seizure or have lameness issues, are older, or have serious health problems. All of our rehabilitation plans are done on an individual basis for each horse by the attending Veterinarian and staff, and the plans are carried out by College Interns,volunteers, and United Neigh members. We vaccinate our horses twice a year to include Rhino Flu, Tetanus, Eastern Western Encephalitis, West Nile, Rabies, Strangles, Potomac Horse Fever, and a Coggins test is done once a year. Worming is done on an individual basis, based on the results of quarterly fecal exams done by college interns and monitored by the Vet. Dental exams are done once a year, and farrier care is provided every 4 to 6 weeks.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Euthanasia is only an option when there is no other humane option available. Reasons for euthanasia to include: terminal illness or injury where there is no possibility of recovery, behavioral problems that pose a perilous threat to other animals or humans, disease transmission, and old age where the quality of life is impaired by major loss of functions. This procedure is done under the guidance and recommendation of a licensed Veterinarian. Euthanasia is never done to create space!!

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     Brook Hill Farm has a no breeding policy, and there is a no-breeding clause in our free lease agreement. All stallions are castrated as soon as possible based on the health of the animal, and there are no exceptions to this policy. Mares and newborn foals are kept together at least 6 months, under the guidance and recommendation of the Veterinarian.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     Yes

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training? 
     All of our studies have been done in conjunction with a college or University. We have been a part of college study on herd behavior, a medical procedure, and discovering the best over the counter product for rain rot.

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     We do not place horses in "foster" care - all of our horses are at Brook Hill Farm during their recovery. Once a horse has recovered, it can be free leased by a qualified forever home, or it is used in our Equine Assisted Activities. A horse can always be returned to Brook Hill Farm.

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Other considerations are provided below.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: Brook Hill Farm began its mission of rescuing unwanted horses in 2001. Along the way, Brook Hill discovered the magic combination of horses and people. As a PATH International Riding Center, it is our goal to ensure excellence and help to change the lives of both horses and humans through equine-assisted activities and therapies. Our center pairs at-risk youth with rescue horses offering the opportunity to form a bond of trust with an animal whose background is, all too often, just as painful as their own. Through hard work and love, the participants care for and heal their rescue horses, and, very often, find healing themselves. It is a win-win situation for both, and this program helps not only to fund the horse rescue mission, but also provides a steady, trained and supervised workforce to ensure the success of our mission.

Brook Hill Farm does not believe in adoption fees - we are not in the business of selling horses, and we do not believe it is in the best interest of a non-profit organization to rely on these fees for their ongoing expenses. Instead, we guarantee that horses can be returned when they are no longer wanted, and we have a set return fee for the horses of $500. This fee was created so we have money to care for them when they first return to the rescue, giving us time to budget for their continued care.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Brook Hill Retirement Center for Horses, Inc

7289 Bellevue Road Forest VA 24551

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Jo Anne Miller

2. Contact's Phone: 540-586-7432

3. Contact's Email: executivedirector@brookhillfarm.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Jo Anne and Jay Miller

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Prepared by: B. Leigh Drewry, Jr., Cunningham Drewry Tax Map Reference No: 114 A 120 THIS LEASE AGREEMENT, made this 1st day of July, 2011, by and between JAY R. AND JOANNE E. MILLER, Grantor, herein referred to as "Landlord," whose address is 7289 Bellevue Road, Forest, VA 24551, BROOK HILL RETIREMENT CENTER FOR HORSES, INC., Grantee, herein referred to as "Tenant," whose address is 7289 Bellevue Road, Forest, VA 24551. WITNESSETH: THAT for and in consideration of the mutual covenants contained herein, the Landlord and Tenant hereby covenant and agree as follows: PREMISES Landlord agrees to lease to Tenant the hereinafter described premises solely for the purpose or purposes specified herein, and subject to the terms and conditions herein set forth for a term of twenty (20) years, to commence on the 1st day of July, 2011, and to end on the 30th day of June, 2031: Fenced pastures, Barn 1, Barn 2 and the 2 room house of the total property consisting of 43.95 acres known locally as Brook Hill Farm with an address of 7289 Bellevue Road, Forest, Bedford County, VA and bearing Tax Map #114 A 120. This does not include the main dwelling, 2 outbuildings and surrounding yard. Brook Hill Farm also has access to additional acreage on a neighboring property on a year to year basis, bringing the total acreage used for the horses to 60 acres. An additional 12 acres is also available. It is the goal of the current management team of Brook Hill Farm for the organization to last far beyond the current Staff. Since its inception in 2001, it has been the goal of the farm to establish an endowment for the eventual purchase of property for the organization to continue. This endowment is built into the long term plan, and will begin to be a reality in 2015.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     PREMISES Landlord agrees to lease to Tenant the hereinafter described premises solely for the purpose or purposes specified herein, and subject to the terms and conditions herein set forth for a term of twenty (20) years, to commence on the 1st day of July, 2011, and to end on the 30th day of June, 2031: Fenced pastures, Barn 1, Barn 2 and the 2 room house of the total property consisting of 43.95 acres known locally as Brook Hill Farm with an address of 7289 Bellevue Road, Forest, Bedford County, VA and bearing Tax Map #114 A 120. This does not include the main dwelling, 2 outbuildings and surrounding yard. Brook Hill Farm also has access to additional acreage on a neighboring property on a year to year basis, bringing the total acreage used for the horses to 60 acres. An additional 12 acres is also available. The owner is compensated monthly, but at year end much of the monthly rent is donated back to the organization.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 3.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 60

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Brook Hill Farm horses are kept on a total of 60 acres: 15 acre isolation field with 3 stall barn 30 acre field with 22 stall barn and 1000 sq foot run in 10 acre field now with a 2 stall barn and run-in 5 acre field Fencing: Board Fence Electric Fence Barb wire covered in hedge row (this is being replaced with board fence)

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     All of the 35 horses have access to the 30 acre field, the 10 acre field and the 5 acre field. Horses that need to be quarantined stay in the 15 acre isolation field. We believe that horses should live in a herd, and be able to roam as much of the entire property as possible.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 24

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     We have a 5 acre field that is able to be shut off from the rest of the pasture that we use for Equine Assisted Activities. The field is grass, and in the center of the field is a 125' x 200' enclosed riding arena made of board fence and has blue sand as its footing. As we are a rehabilitation center for both horses and humans, it is important that the footing is soft, and is well-maintained. This year we added a 40' by 80' therapeutic riding arena with a ramp for our Rockin' Riders Program

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Fully Accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries 2015 - Present: Accredited by the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance 2016 - PATH International Premier Center In 2015 we became fully accredited by the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance for the care of the many thoroughbreds we have rescued and currently care for. "Brook Hill Farm stands out among a field of many wonderful equine rescues in their attention to detail beyond the expected excellence in equine care and rehabilitation," said Jeannine Alexander, GFAS Deputy Director-Equine. "Brook Hill Farm has successfully developed an incredibly professional administrative structure that anchors the confidence their supporters have in their organization. For example, they have created a detailed business/strategic plan that clearly tells the story of their past achievements and highlights their strategic road map to future success. We are so pleased with their plan that we have asked and been granted permission to share some of their document templates with rescues/sanctuaries that are in the process of GFAS Verification or Accreditation. In 2015 we shared this plan on a GFAS webinar,

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Brook Hill Farm owns and has on property a truck, a 2 horse trailer, and a 4 horse trailer. Many of the Board Members and Volunteers also own trucks and trailers and are willing to help transport in an emergency.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Our facility is also a designated United States Pony Club Center for our United Neigh Program. Pony Club is very particular about tack, and we adhere to Pony Club standards. Saddle fittings are done by professionals, and all tack is checked each time it is used for cleanliness, fitting, and to make sure it is safe for use.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Staff and volunteers are assigned a horse on a wipe board in the college lab. Once receiving their assignment, they go to a shelf in the college lab containing record books on each of the horses on property. On the front of the notebook is a postcard with pictures of the 4 views of the horse: head, left side, right side, and rear. In the book is the coggins, all shot records, health records, staff , the rehabilitation plan, and a daily log that is filled out every time someone works with the horse.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     All of our horses live out in a pasture of 60 acres in a herd, as nature intended. The only time a horse is stall bound is under the direct supervision of a Vet. A stall bound horse will quickly have access to a small paddock, and then would be turned out with the herd. When a new horse arrives, full turn-out is gradual to avoid sickness.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     The Veterinarian and staff together create a feeding plan to include any necessary supplements for each horse. This is documented both in the feed room, and in each individual notebook for each horse. All of the horses are brought into individual stalls for feeding.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Brook Hill Farm records the body condition score of each horse on its intake sheet (see above) based on the Henneke Body Conditioning Score chart. The Veterinarian and staff then come up with an individual plan for each horse to include feeding, rehabilitation, and exercise. The vet is a weekly volunteer at the farm, so this information is kept current, and documented.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Manure is removed daily from stalls and the common area by tractor and placed in an area far away from the barn in a compost environment. Dead horses are disposed of by incineration at the state lab located locally. Parasite control is dealt with by fecal exams conducted by College Interns, supervised by the Veterinarian, and worming is done on an individual basis.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Below is a sample of our emergency preparedness plans: Natural Threats: House Fire Barn Fire Hurricane Wildfire CONTACT INFORMATION: Phone Numbers: Primary Emergency Contact - Jo Anne Miller 540-586-9017 Secondary Emergency Contact - Tracy Russler 434-944-1619 Emergency 911 Animal Control: 540-586-7690 Bedford County Sheriff's Office 540-586-4800 Local Extension Office 540-586-7675 State Veterinarian-Dr. McNeil 434-947-6731 Electric Company – American Electric Power 434-522-4200 Equine General Liability Co (Policy # 0030083) 800-723-9414 Veterinarian: Dr. Ronald Fessler 434-525-5112 Veterinarian: Dr. Martha Moses 540-761-4602 Farrier: Richard Nunnally 434-283-2144 Brook Hill Farm Emergency Shut off: Main Electrical Circuit: Office/Kitchen Main Water Valve: Outside Tack Room Back Door Location of other utilities: Phone Line in Main House Your emergency supply kit and first aid kit are located: Office/Kitchen Fire Extinguishers are located: Bathroom in Office, Barn 1, Barn 2 Brook Hill Farm Emergency Shelter: Windhaven Equine Clinic Dr. Ronald Fessler, DVM. Route to site: 221 N take a left onto Gum Tree Rd, left onto Windhaven Farm. Horse Identification and Contacts: Horse medical history and vet records located in individual notebooks labeled for each horse Located at: 7289 Bellevue Rd, Forest VA 24551 Backup file is located at 7053 Bellevue Rd, Forest VA. Brook Hill Farm: Policy for Horse Emergencies: Signs of a sick Horse: Looks sad and miserable, not usual self Sweating Bleeding Lying down, unable to get up Lowered head Runny nose, thick yellow mucus Coughing Won't eat Kicking or Pawing Grinding teeth Droppings diarrhea or hard balls, unusual color Urine altered in color Fever Procedure 1. If any question about an injury or symptom get staff immediately. 2. A vet is to be called. 3. Make situation as safe as possible for everyone, including the horse! 4. All people working with the horse must wear gloves. 5. Procedures for handling of animal to be dictated by the vet. * In case of choking horse, put cold water in their ear to make them shake their head to dislodge object or food! Brook Hill Farm: Policy for People Emergencies: 1. Do not move Patient! 2. Get help from Staff and trained EMT on duty at most sessions 3. Call 911

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     Brook Hill Farm has 2 families on premises as caretakers around the clock. Public access is restricted to open hours, 9 am until 6 pm, Monday through Friday, year round. The drive to the parking area and the entrance is closed when the farm is closed.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Officer Jonathan Jackson 1345 Falling Creek Road Bedford, Virginia 24523 540-586-4800 J.Jackson@BedfordSheriff.org

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance Janice Towles: jtowles@jockeyclub.com,(859)224-2762 c/o The Jockey Club, 821 Corporate Dr., Lexington, KY 40503 Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries Valerie Taylor: Equine, valerie@sanctuaryfederation.org,(623)252-5122 PO Box 32294, Washington, DC 20007 Homes for Horses Coalition Cindy Gendron: cindy@homesforhorses.org or (757)932-0394 VAERO - Virginia Alliance for Equine Rescue Organizations Co-Chairs Jo Anne Miller , Jorg Huckabee-Mayfield Jorg - 1688 Burke’s Tavern Road, Burkeville, VA 23922 (434)767-2839 PATH International Equine Welfare Committee Co-Chairs - JoAnne Miller, Marcie Ehrman Marcie - marcie210@hotmail.com


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 01/17/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Ronald Fessler

Clinic Name: Windhaven Equine Clinic    Street: Po Box 2189    City: Forest  State: VA    Zip: 24551

Phone: 434-525-5112    Email: kkfessler43@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Jo Anne Miller

     2. Instructor: Penny Hawes

     3. Instructor: Tracy Russler


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 35.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 35

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 35

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:We are a rehabilitation facility - when one horse leaves, another takes its place immediately. Our costs are based on the fact that all of our horses come to us lame, have an average stay of 1 year, need special diets and retraining.

35 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 6 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

41 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 4 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 2 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

6 = Total of 2d-2f

35 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            29 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            6 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$30925     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$5850     Veterinarian.

$4585     Farrier.

$130     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$9563     Medications & Supplements.

$8115     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$20000     Horse Care Staff.

$10000     Horse Training.

$10000     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$99168     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

12775     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $8
Question 3 ($99,168 ) divided by Question 4 (12775).

Average length of stay for an equine: 312 days
Question 4 (12775) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (41).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? Most

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 60

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 25

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 50

4. What is the average wait list time? 6 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 1.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 2

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 3

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 50%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed. As a rehabilitation facility, many of our horses come to us with injuries. Under Veterinarian supervision, Brook Hill Farm gives the horses time to heal, and then gradually puts them back to work slowly, doing physical therapy under the guidance of the Vet. Rehabilitation is begun on the ground, and once the horse is serviceably sound, the horse may be used in our PATH programs with At-Risk youth,in our Rockin' Riders therapeutic riding program, or in our program for seniors. Once healed the horse may be available for free lease, or remain in our youth programs.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Jo Anne Miller

         *Facility Participation:

         Brook Hill Retirement Center for Horses, Inc

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2013

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Mentor Training

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. The above instructor is also the Executive Director of the organization,and currently serves as an Adjunct Professor of Equine Science at Randolph College.


     2. *Instructor: Penny Hawes

         *Facility Participation:

         Brook Hill Retirement Center for Horses, Inc

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.BHSAI (British Horse Society)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1978

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.The BHSAI certificate is awarded to candidates who have successfully achieved the BHS Horse Knowledge, Care and Riding Stage 3, hold a Preliminary Teacher's Certificate and have submitted a fully completed Coaching Portfolio or have logged 500 hours teaching.


     3. *Instructor: Tracy Russler

         *Facility Participation:

         Brook Hill Retirement Center for Horses, Inc

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Path International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Tracy holds a bachelor's degree from Ohio University with a major in business and computer programing.