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Special Equestrians, Inc.

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/27/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Kathleen Claybrook

Employees:   Full-Time:  2  Part-Time:  12  Volunteers:  250

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Volunteers are required to attend a volunteer training session which covers many aspects of the program including safety and emergency procedures. Volunteers also are required to have a background check performed before volunteering.

Employees must go through the same training as volunteers. They are also required to attend the conflict of interest and corporate compliance review each year. Human resource documents include job descriptions, employee handbook, and evaluations.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  4

Number of Board Members:  13  Number of Voting Board Members:  10

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member, and the name of the related organization. Rita Mendel is the founder of Special Equestrians, Inc. and also owns Carousel Tack Shoppe. Special Equestrians purchases tack and riding equipment from Carousel Tack Shoppe from time to time.

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     The Therapeutic Horseback Riding Program is taught in small groups of up to six riders to allow for shared experiences with peers that may have similar disabilities and to encourage social interaction before, during, and after class. Children as young as four can participate and there is no specific upper age limit. Each rider may participate in weekly classes for 4-8 week terms throughout the year. Classes are approximately 45 minutes long and consist of stretching exercises and riding skills appropriate to their abilities. They may venture through the sensory trail where swim noodles, wind chimes and numerous activities are designed to promote sensory integration. Some classes include grooming and tacking the horse. Cost to the participant is $200 per eight week term and $100 per four week summer term. Tuition Discounts (scholarships) are provided for anyone who cannot afford to pay.

Therapeutic riding can provide many physical, emotional, and psychological benefits to riders. Balancing on a constantly moving animal is quite a challenge for anyone but particularly for a rider with reduced motor skills. The movement of the horse closely mimics the hip action of a human being, providing physical benefits such as stimulation of dormant nerves, muscles, and even the vocal chords. The warmth of the horse’s body encourages relaxation of tight, rigid muscles reducing spasticity. Riders feel stronger and more confident as they learn to master the horse. Instructors weave important focus and decision making skills into each lesson. An obstacle course can do wonders for a rider’s processing skills. Social skills are enhanced through interaction with volunteers, staff and fellow riders.

Summer Camps are held in June, offering riders an in-depth look at proper horse care. They learn to groom and tack their horses in preparation for their daily lessons, clean stalls and do barn chores. Classroom time includes horse anatomy, simple first aid, how to clean tack and a visit from our Veterinarian. Riders achieve a sense of normalcy and confidence as they care for the horses and equipment. Cost to the participant is $200 for a 4 day camp. Tuition Discounts (scholarships) are provided for anyone who cannot afford to pay.

Hippotherapy allows the client to receive Occupational Therapy on the back of a horse. Sessions are conducted one-on-one by a specially trained, licensed therapist who uses the horse’s movement as the primary tool to achieve functional goals. For many individuals poor postural control, decreased coordination, or impaired sensory processing may limit their independence in their home or school environment. By combining the movement of the horse with specially designed activities and movement patterns, the therapist works to target specific muscles and improve sensory processing of the client. The rider is then educated on how to use these improvements to increase independence in functional tasks such as walking, dressing, eating, and work or school activities. Cost to the participant is $65 per 45 minute session. Tuition Discounts (scholarships) are provided for anyone who cannot afford to pay.

Horseabilities is a transitional class for riders that are no longer able to use Occupational Therapy, but are not yet ready for the group therapeutic riding. It is supervised by both a therapist and instructor. It utilizes many of the same concepts used in Hippotherapy, but allows for a group experience. Volunteers are specially trained to give correct support and the riders are more carefully monitored for fatigue. Due to the need for both a Therapist and Instructors, cost is $270 for 8 weeks, but tuition discounts (scholarships) are provided for anyone who cannot afford to pay.

Unmounted activities are provided for a limited number of participants that are not able to ride any longer due to balance or weight issues. These participants might do barn chores and care for the horse or learn to lead the horse from their wheelchair. We find that they feel an enormous sense of pride in accomplishing these tasks just as they did when they were riding. Our goal is to allow them to ride once again if they are able.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. None.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Special Equestrians, Inc. leases approximately 13 acres on the campus of Indian Springs School. We regularly house 12-14 horses used in our programs. We make every effort to maintain the highest standards of care for these very special horses. Only the most qualified volunteers are allowed to feed, groom and exercise the horses. We respect them and the work they do and we cannot serve our riders safely without happy, healthy horses.

The ideal horses for our program are age 10 and above and are sound and of good temperament. They are under 16 hands tall and must be comfortable being led. We prefer they have had some training in the arena although we have some awesome horses that were used primarily trail horses before coming to us. They are taken through a series of ground exercises and desensitization before gradually introducing them to the program. We are not able to bring in horses that need extensive training or rehabilitation because of our limited space and staff.

Many of our horses live out their final years here with us, but in the case where we need to retire them, a suitable retirement home is located.

Classes are held 5 days a week. Horses are used for up to 11 classes a week, with an average daily use of two to three rides (but no more than four). Most classes are predominantly walking with less than 10 minutes of trotting time per horse. A small number of riders are able to canter.

We schedule their riders according to size, balance and ability. Our older horses carry the lighter riders. During class terms, the horses are exercised generally once a week by a skilled, balanced rider to help them maintain needed muscle and strength. When we are in between class terms, they are ridden 2 times per week.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Most horses are donated or loaned to the program, but occasionally they are purchased. They are generally donated upon retirement from a show career, when families are no longer able to exercise them or can no longer care for them financially.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Generally the horse will leave the organization if they have become intolerant of the activities, they have become lame and cannot be ridden or the owner of a leased horse cancels the lease.

Horses that are on loan and can no longer be used in the program are returned to their owners.

For horses that have been donated, we notify the donor that we are looking for a suitable home in case they want to take them back into their care. Otherwise we advertise the need for a retirement home through our vet, farrier and local tack shop. They remain at our facility until we find a caring placement.

We are fortunate that we have several owners that lend their horses to us during peak times and take them home during the summer or winter months when the demand is low.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     The initial screening by phone and questionnaire determines whether the horse is a candidate for trial in the program. A history is taken that includes physical and personality traits of the horse, health history, training, life experience, and general behavior. Promising horses are evaluated first by observation of the current owner as they groom, tack, and ride the horse at all gaits. They are then ridden and evaluated under saddle by a representative of Special Equestrians.
If accepted "On Trial", a negative Coggins test, appropriate vaccinations, feed and health records are required. Once they arrive on site, they are introduced slowly into the herd, after a brief quarantine period. They remain on trial for 3 months. They are seen by the vet and farrier during that time.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     The Executive Director oversees and, as necessary, adjusts the feed, supplements, and medications needed by each horse. Horses are turned out in a paddock or pasture and brought in twice a day for feeding and a wellness check. They are in assigned stalls for feeding, on class days and during inclement weather. Detailed feed charts are used to maintain consistency with their care. The equine feeding team is comprised of volunteers who are supervised and supplemented by our full and part time staff.

Regular visits from our vet & farrier, who discount their services and even massage therapists who donate their time, ensure the well-being of our herd. A staff member is on-call 24/7 for equine emergencies. If a horse is in distress, staff and veterinarian are called. We have a recovery stall with cameras to monitor an ill horse from our office or home computers. If the horse is too ill to leave unattended, staff will take shifts to monitor or care for the horse. If the illness or injury warrants hospitalization or surgery, they are transported as needed.

Routine vaccinations and dental care are handled by a veterinarian in the Spring and Fall. He advises on parasite control and is on call for emergencies and for other advice. We typically do a fecal count on a sample of horses and de-worm accordingly. Our farrier trims every 5 - 6 weeks and is also on call for emergencies.

Geriatric horses are monitored closely and provided supplements or special feeding routines at the recommendation of the veterinarian.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     If the horse is in pain and veterinary help is either inappropriate or will not improve its condition, the horse will be humanely euthanized by the veterinarian.

If space is needed and the horse is not appropriate for the program, a suitable retirement home is found rather than euthanizing the horse.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     We do not do any breeding.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Over $1,500

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  All equines have one set fee or donation amount.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization approves of this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: Basically, our donors assist with the care of our horses through their donations. We actually call it a horse sponsorship rather than adoption.

There are 2 levels of sponsorship. A full sponsorship is $2,000 and a horse care sponsor is $600 which only covers routine vet and farrier costs.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Special Equestrians, Inc.

1215 Woodward Drive Indian Springs AL 35124

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Kathleen Claybrook

2. Contact's Phone: 205-987-9462

3. Contact's Email: Kclaybrook@specialequest.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Indian Springs School
190 Woodward Drive
Indian Springs, AL 35124

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     The lease term is 15 years from June 2012 through June of 2027. We hope to remain in our current location.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     There are no services that are provided by the Lessor, however they assist us on a regular basis. We only pay for our own utilities. There is no charge for the use of the land. The improvements made to the facilities serve as our payment.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 12.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 10

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Special Equestrians operates on roughly 13 acres of land on which we maintain a 15-stall stable, a covered arena, an open arena, four pastures, and five paddocks.The pastures and paddocks are fenced with a combination of ratchet wire electric fence and 2 board wood fencing. All of the paddocks and three of the pastures have run-in structures for protection. The stable consists of 15 box stalls. Stalls are 12 X 12, 10 X 12 and a large stall which is 13 X 12. One of the stalls has access to a small paddock. It also has cameras posted to allow us to watch recovering horses from a computer.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Horses are generally turned out in a paddock or pasture 24 hours a day unless there is inclement weather. They are brought in 2 times a day for feeding and they go out in the opposite turnout. They are usually out in a pasture for at least 6 hours per day. The pastures are seeded and fertilized annually. The pastures are rested as needed.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 20

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     We have one covered arena with molded plastic fence rails. The footing is 4 inches of crushed gravel, with one inch of shavings combined with 1 inch of sand. The arena is raked and dragged weekly. There are 2 outside arenas enclosed with wood fencing and grass footing.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Special Equestrians is a Premier Accredited Center with PATH, Intl.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     We have a truck and 2 horse trailer.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Before using any equipment on our horses, blankets, saddles, bridles or halters, the fit is checked by the appropriate staff. The fit of the saddles is regularly monitored to be sure the proper fit is maintained. Our massage therapists notify us of any soreness after their monthly massage as well.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Each horse has a picture stall card on their assigned stall with a detailed description. They also wear a leather break away halter with a name plate.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     The only time our horses are stall bound is in the case of an injury. They are kept in our recovery stall and as they are able to have small amounts of turnout, we are able to give them access to a small paddock with limited grass. This turnout area is also monitored by cameras. We then introduce them to larger turnout areas as they progress.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     We use high quality feeds. Most of our horses are on Nutrena Safe Choice. The easy keepers are fed a vitamin enriched feed to ensure the appropriate nutrition while feeding a small amount. With our aged horses we supplement as needed with senior feed, vitamins, iron, and joint supplements depending on the needs of the horse. When pastures are low during the winter months, they are fed hay 2 times per day to supplement. Older horses are given shredded hay to aid in the chewing.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Our horses are weighed each month and their condition is evaluated by staff to determine any changes in feed or exercise that need to be made. Many times a horse coming in on trial may be thin to very thin, but we gradually build their nutrition and exercise to improve their condition.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Manure is removed from stalls 2 times a day and put in a pit that is cleaned out as needed. We reside on a private school campus and they use the manure for their vegetable garden which is quite large. Our vet checks our fecal samples at lease 1 time per year, and recommends a deworming schedule from there. Carcasses are buried with guidance from our veterinarian.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Emergency Procedures Fire Evacuate everyone from barn. Head personnel will evaluate situation and designate someone to call 911. Be sure to tell them there is a fire or the fire trucks will not come over bridge. Evacuate horses only after making sure all persons are out of barn and surveying scene to be sure it is safe to enter. Remove horses closest to fire first. Lead horses to closest paddock or pasture if possible. Horses may panic and not want to leave their stalls, talk quietly to them to reassure them, if they still won't leave or are unmanageable, leave stall door open and move to next horse Be aware that once the horse is out of the barn it may try to run back in. Tornado Weather radio is located outside office beside first aid box. If a tornado is approaching head for the bathroom sit on floor between toilet and wall away from window. Sit and put your face down and cover your head with your hands. If there is a watch or a warning and the tornado is not an immediate threat, check weather radio located beside first aid box by the office. There is also a battery operated one on shelf in bathroom. If there is time move all horses in barn to lower pasture. On campus safe place during a tornado is located in the gymnasium near the soccer field. Severe Thunderstorm Check weather on weather radio located beside first aid box. If there are no tornado watches or warnings or high wind warnings, and hail or dangerous lightning is expected, horses should be brought into stalls. If dangerous lightning has already begun do not risk yourself to bring the horses in. If there are horses in unprotected paddocks open the gates between them and the pasture so they can get out. Flood Be aware that excessive rain can cause the bridge coming in to flood and block your exit. Keep an eye on it and leave the property well before the water reaches the bridge. If we cannot get to the horses, there is staff that live on this side of the bridge and have been trained to care for the horses. Do not drive through if water is over the road! WHEN MOUNTED Tornado Watch/Warning We do not ride in the event of a tornado watch, regardless of the present weather. If a watch occurs while we are riding, we will finish the class and discontinue classes for the day. Note: All classes will be canceled if we are under a tornado watch. Inclement Weather During Class (Tornado Warning, Severe Thunderstorms with lightning or high winds) With the assistance from the instructor, riders will quickly dismount their horses and go to the stable. The horse handler will calmly take the horse to the stable. In case of tornado, all people go to gymnasium on Indian Springs School property. In Case of Fire Remove all people from the facility and its proximity. (Not in pastures) Call 911; be sure to tell them the structure is on fire. Remove animals from the structure and its proximity. (Upper Pasture if possible) Dismount all riders and take them to their cars.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     We are very fortunate to reside on the campus of a private school with a guard at the gate 24 hours a day. They have been given a list of all riders, volunteers and visitors.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Shelby County Humane Society 381 McDow Road Columbiana, AL 35051 info@shelbyhumane.org 205/669-3916

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Alabama Horse Council P.O. Box 553 Columbiana, AL 35051 info@alabamahorsecouncil.org


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/19/2017

Veterinarian: Jud Easterwood

Clinic Name: Easterwood Equine Hospital    Street: 12093 Highway 25    City: Calera  State: AL    Zip: 35040

Phone: 205-663-4000    Email: horsedoc@easterwoodequine.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Betsy Guttshall

     2. Instructor: Courtney Wrenn

     3. Instructor: Ellen Davis

     4. Instructor: Kathleen Claybrook

     5. Instructor: Madison Pozzo

     6. Instructor: Matthew Bunt

     7. Instructor: Megan Smith

     8. Instructor: Melinda Bartlett

     9. Instructor: Pam Abdulla

     10. Instructor: Rob Moore

     11. Instructor: Sally Cope

     12. Instructor: Teresa McCombs


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 14.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 14

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 15

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

12 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 5 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

17 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 2 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 1 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

3 = Total of 2d-2f

14 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            14 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$15587     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$1200     Bedding.

$11111     Veterinarian.

$10050     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$7259     Medications & Supplements.

$6132     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$6280     Horse Care Staff.

$2150     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$59769     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

5117     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $12
Question 3 ($59,769 ) divided by Question 4 (5117).

Average length of stay for an equine: 301 days
Question 4 (5117) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (17).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? Most of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 120

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 20

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 31

4. What is the average wait list time? 1 Years(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 1.00  Un-Mounted: 0.00  Total: 1

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 98%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Betsy Guttshall

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2007

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     2. *Instructor: Courtney Wrenn

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     3. *Instructor: Ellen Davis

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2001

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.American Hippotherapy Association

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2003

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Hippotherapy Clinical Specialist

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Alabama State Board of Occupational Therapy

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2000

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Licensed Occupational Therapist


     4. *Instructor: Kathleen Claybrook

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1991

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning


     5. *Instructor: Madison Pozzo

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     6. *Instructor: Matthew Bunt

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2006

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     7. *Instructor: Megan Smith

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2017

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     8. *Instructor: Melinda Bartlett

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     9. *Instructor: Pam Abdulla

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1991

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     10. *Instructor: Rob Moore

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Rob helps to train our horses for Therapeutic Riding using a natural horsemanship approach. He has been riding and training for 15 years.


     11. *Instructor: Sally Cope

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2006

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     12. *Instructor: Teresa McCombs

         *Facility Participation:

         Special Equestrians, Inc.

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor