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Communication Alliance to Network Thoroughbred ExRacehorses (CANTER Michigan)

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/06/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Robbie Timmons

Employees:   Full-Time:  0  Part-Time:  0  Volunteers:  20

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Volunteers complete a Volunteer application describing their abilities with various duties ranging from working with excel sheets, record-keeping, marketing, fundraising, help with CANTER events at Hazel Park raceway, merchandise sales, social media.. to hands-on horse care and training. Each volunteer is contacted and a personal meeting is scheduled to help with evaluation of his/her contribution to Canter and to discuss Canter opportunities that interest them. Each volunteer is given a "Volunteer Guide" with information about Canter, its mission, activities, Volunteer responsibilities and expectations.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  4

Number of Board Members:  10  Number of Voting Board Members:  5

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     CANTER Michigan takes non-competitive and injured thoroughbreds off racetracks in Michigan and the Midwest, and provides veterinary assessment and treatment, farrier care to remove racing plates, assess hooves, provide treatment and new shoes. The OTTB is given time to adjust to farm life and living in a herd. Retraining begins on a lunge line, then walk, trot, canter under saddle, trail riding followed by more advanced training in dressage, jumping and sport horse disciplines. X-rays of injured thoroughbreds are sent to MSU and, if a surgery candidate, the horse receives life saving surgery at Michigan State University to remove bone chips or repair leg fractures. CANTER allows MSU Vet students to assist with all aspects of arthroscopic surgery enabling them to receive an advanced education. Injured thoroughbreds receive several months post surgery rehab at a CANTER rehab facility. Following veterinary evaluation and approval, they can begin retraining for a new career. CANTER actively markets OTTBs to CANTER approved adopters.
The University of Michigan Equestrian Team rides and trains at Willowbrooke Farm.
For advanced riders, working with CANTER thoroughbreds provide experience with OTTBs that is often a great resume' builder for budding professionals.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 2

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. CANTER works with Michigan State University Veterinary students to help expand their education by allowing Vet students to assist with all aspects of arthroscopic surgeries on injured thoroughbreds from diagnosis, surgery preparation, anesthesia, arthroscopic surgery and post surgery care.
Because of the CANTER program at Michigan State University, the Equine Program in the College of Veterinary Medicine is one of the best in the country as it provides unique educational opportunities for veterinary students.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Every OTTB coming into the CANTER program immediately receives veterinary evaluation for sore or injured legs, dental needs, body condition, overall health and may receive xrays if any injuries are suspected. Vet recommendations are immediately implemented and medical and dental care provided. A Farrier pulls racing plates, examines hooves for injury or disease, assesses hoof condition and formation. Corrective shoes may be recommended or shoes to help improve hoof health are put on. Each horse is given time to adjust to farm life in a separate paddock away from other horses. Many times an OTTB has never grazed so must be introduced to grass, or has not had light in its stall, so is fearful of an open stall window. CANTER handlers of OTTBs are patient and give each horse rehabilitation time to relax, with lunging exercises before beginning basic training under saddle in walk, trot and canter. As each horse progresses in training, it is evaluated for its potential career and is constantly monitored for any lameness.
Each thoroughbred is given necessary grain, nutrients and high quality hay to maintain its athletic weight. Thoroughbreds in the CANTER retraining program seem eager to learn and are good candidates for retraining as sport horses, dressage or trail horses.
CANTER attempts to keep an open door for thoroughbreds that need to leave racing and come into the CANTER program by actively marketing its horses to CANTER approved buyers. CANTER accepts non-competitive thoroughbreds and thoroughbreds with racing injuries such as bone chips or fractured legs. CANTER obtains xrays of the injuries which are submitted to Michigan State University Equine Hospital for assessment of surgery requirements. A surgery date at MSU is set, and transport of the horse is arranged from the racetrack to MSU. Following surgery, the horse is transported to a rehab farm to begin several months of post surgery rehab.
CANTER Michigan is unique as it accepts injured thoroughbreds and provides surgery to repair racetrack injuries.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     CANTER is contacted by a thoroughbred racing owner/trainer who wants to retire its non competitive thoroughbred from racing, giving it the opportunity to excel in a new career through the CANTER program of rehab, retrain, re-home. Some want their injured thoroughbred to come into the CANTER program to receive surgery to repair racetrack injuries followed by CANTER's rehabilitation and retraining for a new career.
CANTER does not charge a fee to accept any thoroughbred into its program.
CANTER does not pay a racing owner/trainer to buy the thoroughbred.
The racing owner donates the horse to CANTER and receives a horse donation letter from CANTER that can be used for tax purposes.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     CANTER requires that all adopters be pre-approved by completing a CANTER Buyer Approval Form that includes information about their horse care experience, level of riding- whether beginner, intermediate or experienced and what discipline (Trail, Dressage, Hunter, Jumper, Polo, etc.) the horse will be ridden. The Approval form also requires information and descriptions of the farm where the horse will be boarded and whether a trainer will be used. Equine Vet information is required and a CANTER volunteer contacts the Vet to obtain a Vet Reference to approve or deny the adoption of the CANTER horse.
CANTER actively markets horses using email promotion, Facebook, and CANTER website to promote CANTER horses to potential adopters; creates and distributes Flyers with photos and descriptions of Horses available for adoption; features horses in quarterly e-newsletters and publicizes CANTER horses in local horse publications, at Horse Shows and advertises on Equine.com.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Each Thoroughbred off the track comes to CANTER with a current Coggins, Health Certificate and Veterinary contact. When possible, CANTER will request a Vet pre-purchase exam to identify any medical issues. Once at a CANTER farm, an equine veterinarian immediately assesses each new horse for lameness, injuries, dental needs, body condition, overall health and may take xrays if any injuries are suspected. UlcerGuard and worming may be recommended as well as special grain and nutrients to maintain the horse's weight and condition.
A Farrier removes racing plates, examines and assesses hooves for injury, disease or hoof problems. The farrier may put on new shoes on front hooves suitable for training.
The new horse is slowly introduced to the herd and will not begin basic training under saddle until it has had time to adapt to its surroundings and new life.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Each CANTER thoroughbred is assessed daily for any changes physically such as a pain response when groomed or handled, or in its behavior such as not eating or acting lethargic. If detected, the horse is closely monitored and a Vet contacted for recommendations or a farm visit.
Each CANTER thoroughbred is on a regular vaccination, farrier, worming and dental schedule.
Since CANTER takes thoroughbred racehorses off racetracks for retraining into new careers, none is a senior horse.The majority are between the ages of 3 and 8.
CANTER accepts thoroughbreds with serious injuries that are at risk of being sent to slaughter and provides life saving surgery followed by months of rehabilitation, then retraining for a new career.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Each injured thoroughbred into CANTER receives medical care and surgery when prescribed to repair racetrack injuries. If the equine surgeon advises that surgery will not relieve the horse's pain and suggests euthanasia, euthanasia is permitted as a last resort. Euthanasia of a horse is only allowed after every option to save the horse has been exhausted and the equine veterinarian suggests euthanasia to relieve the horse's pain.
CANTER's euthanasia policy is based on recommendations of the AAEP and Humane Society.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     Breeding is not allowed at CANTER boarding facilities and all stallions are immediately gelded. Mares are adopted with the stipulation that they may not be bred for racing foals with CANTER having the right to seize the mare if breeding rules are violated.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: $1,001 to $1,500

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine level of training.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine health and soundness.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization approves of this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: Injured thoroughbreds coming into CANTER to receive life saving surgery to repair racetrack injuries such as bone chip removal or fractured legs are taken to Michigan State University Equine Veterinary Hospital. Veterinary students have the opportunity for advanced equine education by assisting in all aspects of surgery including diagnosis through xrays and physical examination, preparing the horse for surgery, anesthesia, assisting during arthroscopic surgery in the operating room, post surgery care, bandage changing and administering medications. CANTER horses help the medical training of Veterinary students at Michigan State University who assist MSU equine surgeons.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 2

.

Location 1 of 2
Willowbrooke Farm

7461 Brookville Rd. Plymouth MI 48178

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Jennifer Blades

2. Contact's Phone: 313-938-9221

3. Contact's Email: willowbrookefarm@aol.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Use

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Jennifer Blades
7461 Brookville Rd.
Plymouth, Michigan 48178
734-737-0899 barn
313-038-9221
willowbrookefarm@aol.com

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Boarding and Training agreement between CANTER and Willowbrooke Farm dated 12/20/2015 with no end date. CANTER may terminate the agreement with or without notice at any time. The agreement may also be terminated at the request of Willowbrooke Farm.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     Farm Owner, Trainer Jennifer Blades assesses each thoroughbred for its potential career and begins basic training on a lunge line then under saddle in walk, trot, canter and jumping cross poles. If the OTTB has the interest and potential to be a jumper, training advances to an indoor arena jump course. Jennifer Blades donates her time and talents to CANTER in marketing horses through photos and videos posted on Willowbrooke Farm Facebook, shared by Canter Michigan Facebook. CANTER horses at Willowbrooke are featured in frequent flyers that are created and distributed throughout the equine community. CANTER pays Willowbrooke Farm $575. to $700. monthly for board, daily care, feed and training, depending on the daily needs of the horse, but does not pay for evaluations or minor treatment required, marketing of CANTER horses, meetings with potential adopters or time spent on paperwork. Jennifer Blades arranges regular veterinary and farrier visits for CANTER horses. Coordinating with the vet, Jennifer Blades ensures that all horses are up to date on vaccines, dental care and have proper shoes for training.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 1.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 45

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Willowbrooke has 65 Stalls Indoor Arena 100'x200' Indoor Arena 200'x65' Four large grass Pastures (1) 10 acres, (3) 3 acres each with 5 run-in sheds. 16 Paddocks Sizes 200x200 to 400x400 2 Large Outdoor Arenas 150'x300' each Trails Fencing is 3-rail Flex Fencing

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Willowbrooke Farm rotates horses in pastures so grass is not depleted and rotates horses in paddocks. Pastures and paddocks are of adequate size to maintain healthy grazing.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 12

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     The majority of training and riding takes place in the 100'x200' indoor arena as well as the 65' x 200' indoor arena. As weather permits, the outdoor arenas are used. Show Jumping setups can be placed in the large indoor arena. Indoor arenas have wooden kick walls with a sand, dirt, proper footing mixture flooring. Outdoor arena has sand, dirt, good footing mixture for flooring.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     TAA accredited

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Emergency horse transportation is available 24/7 at Willowbrooke Farm. Horse trailer on premises.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Trainer checks all tack and equipment prior to use. A professional saddle fitter is available as needed. CANTER purchases proper size and weight blankets for each CANTER horse. Blankets are not shared among horses and are cleaned, sanitized and repaired to maintain safe and clean use. New Blankets purchased Winter, 2015-2016.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     A Horse Daily Status Board is readily visible by trainers, caretakers and volunteers to identify each CANTER horse and includes notations to update information on training, accomplishments in training, feed, any changes physically or in personality and any vet and farrier visits and treatment.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Willowbrooke is primarily a training facility. If a horse is recovering from surgery or requires stall rest, horses are led out of stalls for hand walking 5 to 15 minutes if they are recovering from surgery. As they heal, they are led into an individual paddock for limited exercise. When approved by a vet for full turnout, they are taken to larger paddocks or pastures.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Each thoroughbred may require a specialized diet, fat supplements, extra feed or nutrients to maintain its athletic weight. Equine nutritionists and equine vets may suggest a specialized diet, which is implemented.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Willowbrooke Farm keeps horses at a 5 or 6 Henneke Body Conditioning Score. Amount and type of feed, fat supplements and nutrients are considered in the horse's daily diet to maintain the Henneke score.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Willowbrooke follows Veterinary recommendations on de-worming and schedule of vaccinations. All horses are required to have current vaccinations. Manure is removed daily and disposed of off property.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Emergency phone numbers are visible at all times. All trainers, caregivers, farm managers, workers are trained to quickly and properly respond to all emergencies that may require the evacuation of horses from barns, or how to secure the barns to protect horses from severe weather. Willowbrooke Farm address is visible to give by phone to emergency responders. Veterinary and farrier emergency numbers are visible at all times. Halters and leads are on stall doors and tagged. Farm Manager and Farm owner are available to respond immediately to any emergency. Fire extinguishers in barns and near arenas. Special Emergency plan for first responders posted by the Road on the Willowbrooke Farm Sign, n a black cylinder. It identifies locations of water, fuel, electric, equipment and general layout of the farm.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     Willowbrooke has 24/7 on premises barn manager or owner. There is one entrance to the property preventing unknown public access.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Humane Society of Huron Valley works with the Ann Arbor Police Department and Washtenaw County Sheriff's Department, who has Animal Control officers. 3100 Cherry Hill Road Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 734-662-5585 Ypsilanti Township, Michigan 734-994-2911

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     TAA Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance 821 Corporate Drive Lexington, Kentucky 40503 info@thoroughbredcare.org 859-296-3045


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/03/2017

Veterinarian: Peter Esterline, DVM

Clinic Name: Kern Road Veterinary Clinic    Street: 105 Fowlerville Road    City: Fowlerville  State: MI    Zip: 48836

Phone: 517-223-9618    Email: info@kernroadvet.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Jennifer Blades


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 10.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 72

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 100

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Willowbrooke Farm is a training facility for CANTER thoroughbreds who come into training directly from racetracks in Michigan,Kentucky,Ohio, Illinois,West Virginia or after completing rehabilitation at the rehab facility, Wood Show Horses, utilized by CANTER Michigan. Willowbrooke averages 15 horses at one time for an average of 182 days. As horses are adopted and leave, additional horses come into Willowbrooke for training.

17 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 24 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

41 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 19 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 7 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

26 = Total of 2d-2f

15 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            15 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$8190     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$18900     Veterinarian.

$5400     Farrier.

$1500     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$1500     Medications & Supplements.

$1500     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$51750     Horse Care Staff.

$9000     Horse Training.

$4100     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$101840     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

3650     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $28
Question 3 ($101,840 ) divided by Question 4 (3650).

Average length of stay for an equine: 89 days
Question 4 (3650) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (41).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses?

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. Most

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.



Location 2 of 2
Wood Show Horses

596 Hagadorn Road Mason MI 48854

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Cathy Wood

2. Contact's Phone: 517-256-6548

3. Contact's Email: cwoodshowhorses@aol.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Use

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Cathy and Alan Wood
596 Hagadorn Rd.
Mason, Michigan 48854
517-256-6548
cwoodshowhorses@aol.com

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Boarding and rehabilitation agreement between CANTER and Wood Show Horses Farm dated 2/15/16 with no end date. CANTER may terminate the agreement with or without notice at any time. The agreement may also be terminated at the request of Wood Show Horses.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     Cathy Wood provides rehabilitation to CANTER horses recovering from surgery at Michigan State University. Cathy Wood has the ability to transport horse to and from MSU. Her farm is located near MSU and she can be in contact with the equine surgery at MSU to answer any questions about the recovery of the horse. She follows MSU discharge papers which include frequent bandage changing, medications, evaluation of the surgical site, assessment of infection, changes in eating and overall recuperation of the horse following surgery. The horse is on stall rest for a minimum 30 days with daily hand walking 5-15 minutes. The 2nd and 3rd month of rehab, Cathy can turnout the horse in a small paddock. Cathy will advise CANTER, and a vet will confirm thru examination, when the horse is ready to be transported to a CANTER training facility to begin retraining for its new career.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 1.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 20

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Wood Show Horses has a 10-acre grass pasture and 9 paddocks. Fencing is 5-board vinyl and electric braid. Four outside run-in shelters. One barn with 24 stalls.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Each CANTER thoroughbred on post surgery rehabilitation has a stall for stall rest. Once released by the vet for small turnout, the horse can go into one of 9 paddocks. Most CANTER horses are on stall rest. When rehab is complete and the vet approves full turnout, the horse can be turned out into the large pasture with other horses.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 2

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Wood Show Horses Farm is utilized by CANTER for rehabilitation only, no training. Most horses are on stall rest. When vet approves, the rehab horse may be turned out for a short time into a small paddock.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     TAA Accredited

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Emergency transportation is available 24/7 as the owners of the farm live at the location and have access to their horse trailer.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? No

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     CANTER horses at Wood Show Horses farm are not ridden or trained. No saddles or riding tack are required. Horses on rehab are housed in stalls inside the barn. Halters and leads are provided by Wood Show Horses when a horse is approved for limited walking or turnout into a small paddock.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Each CANTER Horse is identified by its name on its stall. A maximum of 4 CANTER horses are at Wood Show Horses at any one time and easy to keep track of. Frequent photos of each horse are taken and are available for identification if needed, but Cathy Wood is very familiar with each CANTER horse and can readily identify each one.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     CANTER horses at Wood Show Horses Farm are on short term rehabilitation from lameness, or minor injury, or long term rehabilitation following surgery to remove bone chips or repair leg fractures. The first 60 days, the surgery horse is on stall rest with daily hand walking 5-15 minutes. When the Vet approves, the rehab horse can turned out in a small paddock. After 4 months the Vet may approve full turnout in a pasture. Each rehab horse is led separately into their stall at night. They are checked daily for any signs of infection, lameness or post surgery rehab issues.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     CANTER horses at Wood Show Horses are maintained at the proper weight through feed, grain and fat supplements. Adjustments are made depending on the needs of each horse.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     CANTER horses are maintained at the 5-6 Henneke Body Conditioning Score. Feed amounts, type of feed/graint/supplements and feed schedules follow the vet's recommendation for horses on stall rest or on rehab with limited exercise.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Stalls are cleaned daily. Manure is composted and removed off site for disposal. Veterinary advises when vaccination updates are needed and de-worming,

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Each person handling horses or working at Wood Show Horses farm is trained in emergency procedures to close the barn in severe weather to keep horses safe, or procedures to evacuate horses from the barn if necessary. Emergency phone numbers for vet, farrier, emergency responders are easily visible. Fire extinguishers in barn. First aid kits for equines and humans in barn. Address of Wood Show Horses Farm is visible to easily give to emergency responders.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     Owners of Wood Show Horses Farm live at the farm to ensure security and safety of the horses and the farm. Public access to horses is limited and anyone coming onto the farm would be seen.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Ingham County Animal Control 600 Curtis Street Mason, Michigan 48854 517-676-8370 jmcaloon@ingham.org

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     TAA Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance 821 Corporate Drive Lexington, Kentucky 40503 info@thoroughbredcare.org 859-296-3045


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/08/2017

Veterinarian: Perry Ragon, DVM

Clinic Name: Kern Road Veterinary Clinic    Street: 105 Fowlerville Road    City: Fowlerville  State: MI    Zip: 48836

Phone: 517-223-9618    Email: info@kernroadvet.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Cathy Wood


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 4.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 20

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 30

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Wood Show Farms is a rehabilitation facility. Once a horse is vet approved to begin training, it is transported to training farm Willowbrooke. Wood Show Horses may have 1 horse on rehab for a week, then add a second horse needing rehab for 2 months, or add post surgery rehab horses requiring a minimum 6 months rehab. Wood Show Horses will average 3 horses on rehab for 6 months of 182 days and will have a minimum number of 1-2 horses rotating in and out during the year - or a total of 10 horses during 12 months coming into Wood Show Horses for rehab, then leaving for training at Willowbrooke Farm.

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 7 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

10 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 7 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

7 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            3 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$1800     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$3600     Veterinarian.

$1200     Farrier.

$1000     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$1000     Medications & Supplements.

$300     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$16200     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$1000     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$26100     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

910     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $29
Question 3 ($26,100 ) divided by Question 4 (910).

Average length of stay for an equine: 91 days
Question 4 (910) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (10).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses?

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Most of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. Most

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Carrie Turner Thorne

         *Facility Participation:

         Hamilton Ridge Farm

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Equine Message Therapy

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Carrie Turner Thorne is a certified Equine Massage Therapist

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Carrie Turner Thorne is a certified Equine Massage Therapist whose abilities help diagnose and treat back problems, leg issues or other physical concerns so they can be treated and relieve the horse of pain so it can more readily recover from surgery and progress in its rehabilitation. Carrie Turner Thorne's ability to treat a horse's pain through non invasive methods enables the horse to be pain free so that it can start or continue training.


     2. *Instructor: Cathy Wood

         *Facility Participation:

         Wood Show Horses

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Cathy Wood is experienced with providing rehabilitation for horses recovering from surgery and healing for horses needing layup time from lameness or minor injury.


     3. *Instructor: Jennifer Blades

         *Facility Participation:

         Willowbrooke Farm

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Jennifer Blades is a Coach of the University of Michigan Equestrian Team. She and Willowbrooke Farm host the Girls Town Program for 12-16 yr.old girls living in homeless shelters in the inner city, in which they learn about horses and ride them. Jennifer Blades and Willowbrooke host Summer Camps to enrich and enhance horse riding experiences. Jennifer Blades has ridden and shown nationally with numerous wins and championships. She qualified for State Finals and won several gold medals. She now enjoys training CANTER OTTBs, and matching them with riders, as she mentors and trains them to compete. Many students have won national championships and medal finals at all levels of shows throughout Michigan and the Midwest. Willowbrooke has riders and former CANTER horses entered in the annual RRP (Retired Racehorse Project) in Lexington, KY, in October. She believes in continuing education and has attended and participated in trainer symposiums in Wellington, Florida.


     4. *Instructor: Ruth Hill Schorsch

         *Facility Participation:

         Stapleton Farm

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.USDF

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Awards for Achievement in Dressage Competition through FEI Levels

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. More than 15 Years Training Experience in Eventing and Dressage. Dressage training through FEI Levels Eventing training through Training/Preliminary Coach of Michigan State University Dressage Team since 2007 Has Experience with many breeds and types of horses. Received National Awards and Regional Awards. Received USDF Silver Medal Received USDF Bronze Medal