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Equine Assisted Therapy Alaska

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/19/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Rebecca Widmer

Employees:   Full-Time:  1  Part-Time:  4  Volunteers:  200

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. EATA provides orientation and training sessions, materials, and online resources for volunteers. Employees are given hard-copy workforce pamphlets and training materials. Volunteers are supervised by a PATH Intl. certified riding instructor during sessions and by a volunteer or paid staff member with experience and vetting working with EATA.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  12

Number of Board Members:  8  Number of Voting Board Members:  8

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Equine Assisted Therapy Alaska (EATA) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, our mission is to enhance the physical, psychological, and social well-being of Alaskans living with disabilities through therapeutic horsemanship. We offer equine-assisted activities and therapies, include a program specifically for veterans called, “Freedom Reins.”

Clients:
EATA serves three clients an hour, five days a week, between 6-8 hours a day. In 2016, 118 clients participated in our eight-week summer program. EATA beneficiaries live primarily in the Anchorage and Mat-Su areas, but we also served clients from Tok and Dillingham this year. 76% of EATA participants are under 18 years of age, 64% are male. 15 veterans from the Veterans Affairs Domiciliary participated in our Freedom Reins program. We continue to have a partnership with three clinics in the Anchorage area for therapeutic activities, through Alaska OT Services, Alaska Pediatric Therapy, and All For Kids Pediatric Therapy. Participant demographic make-up consists of 58% Caucasian, 31% are Alaska Native, 6% are Hispanic, 3% are African-American, and 2% are of Asian descent.

Alaska’s leading therapeutic riding center provides multi-faceted benefits to individuals with a wide-range of physical, neuromuscular disorders, learning and language disabilities, hearing, visual and cognitive impairments, behavioral and emotional disorders. Some specific conditions include amputations, functional spinal curvature, Cerebral Palsy, Spina Bifida, Multiple Sclerosis, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Traumatic Brain Injury, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Down Syndrome, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

Programs:
Equine-Assisted Therapies (EAT) are sessions run by licensed occupational, physical, speech-language therapists/pathologists, or mental health specialists with a PATH certified riding instructor. During sessions, clients ride a therapy horse and work to fulfill the goals set by the therapist. There are unique challenges not present in clinical setting that encourage the client to engage in a task that few able-bodied individuals are capable of accomplishing mentally or physically. For those bound to a wheelchair, the horse’s gait provides a unique opportunity for the client to move his or her body in a manner similar to walking, as the horse’s gait mimics an individuals natural walk (or gait). This movement exercises their legs and back, while it strengthens their spinal cord.

Equine-Assisted Activities (EAA) are the many activities that occur at the center, whether the rider is on the horse or not. This can include stable management, grooming, learning basic horsemanship skills, shows, and other demonstrations. For the majority of the participants, equine-assisted activities involve mounted or therapeutic riding in the arena or on the trails with a PATH certified riding instructor and a group of volunteers. The goals vary from rider to rider, yet a general goal is to work on self-confidence, teamwork and social development. This environment also improves the rider's core strength, manual dexterity and flexibility.

"Freedom Reins" focuses on active, reserve, separated, and retired men and women of the Armed Forces suffering from the effects of military service. This program is primarily an equine-assisted activity based program, but aims to incorporate both the equine-assisted therapy and equine-facilitated psychotherapy in the future. This program is a rehabilitative program and aims to give riders true freedom from their limitations, while rebuilding their confidence and self-esteem.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 2

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. N/A

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Equine Assisted Therapy Alaska (EATA) values and views each of its horses as family, partners, members of the EATA team, and as facilitators of healing. EATA does not believe a horse is a “tool” or a means to an end. EATA owns a total of five (4) horses and is free leased an average of two (2) to (5) more horses during programming.

Each of EATA’s horses are chosen based on their suitability and temperament for therapeutic riding activities. EATA’s highest priority is safety for the horses, clients, and volunteers. EATA provides constant evaluation to determine the suitability of the horse for this type of programming. If a horse shows signs of either mental/physical fatigue or discomfort, EATA takes immediate steps to rectify the problem. Any physical concerns are addressed through the consultation of a licensed veterinarian. A horse will not be used for programming until they have been cleared physically by the program director who is a PATH Intl riding instructor and mentor. Per PATH Intl standards, a PATH certified riding instructor must be present during all sessions therefore the riding instructor can pay special attention to ensure horses are being handled in a safe and appropriate manner. Additionally, per EATA policy and PATH Intl. the horse is only used for two (2) continuous hours and no more than six (6) hours per day. If a horse is showing signs of mental fatigue, physical distress, or other signs of unhappiness with a specific activity, steps will be taken to attempt to ensure the comfortability of the horse or they are removed from the activity and placed under observation. First, EATA consults a veterinarian to ensure there are no underlying physical conditions. Secondly, the program director and/or riding instructor will assess how the horse is handled by volunteers, therapists, and participants. If any concerns are noted, EATA will enact changes immediately. If the horse is still not able to provide therapeutic riding activities, the horse’s strengths will be reassessed and the best course of action will be chosen. Courses of action will either be retirement, finding a new job for the horse within the organization, returning the horse to its owner per free lease agreement, or selling the horse to a thoroughly vetted buyer for a new career that focuses on the horse’s strengths. EATA horses are generally retired to the program director’s ranch where they will be provided the utmost care and will live out their days in comfort. If they are retired elsewhere, the retirement provider is vetted to ensure the protection and well-being of the horse.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     EATA acquires horses either through purchase and/or lease agreements. Donated horses must follow the requirements needed for PATH Intl. donated/free-leased horses.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Horses leave EATA when they are no longer suitable to provide therapeutic riding activities. Horses are either retired, returned to their owner per free lease agreement, or sold to a vetted buyer for a new career based on the horse’s strengths. Horses deemed ready for retirement are generally retired to the program director’s home and ranch in Oregon. There the horses will be provided with the utmost care and comfort. If the horse is retired elsewhere, the organization or individual is thoroughly vetted to ensure the horse will given the care required and will not come to any harm.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     The program director visits and rides the prospective horse at least twice to ensure the horse is suitable for programming and exhibits a consistent temperament and training level. During the visits the program director will view the horse’s health record and will determine if a veterinarian consult is needed. Some horses are leased to EATA on a temporary trial basis prior to purchase. This is preferred as it allows EATA to fully vet the horse’s suitability to the program, it’s level of training, and temperament as it changes environments. This is important as hippotherapy is an intense program that is constantly changing and not every equine is capable of handling the pressures from the external environment coupled with the riders instability.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     All of EATA’s horses and the free lease horses are seen by a local veterinarian at least twice a year, a farrier on a 6-8 weeks schedule, dewormed quarterly, and grain/hay is increased/decreased based on the horses weight/exercise needs. The Program Director and Barn Manager have eyes on the horses during programming at least 3-4 times a day if not more often. During off-season, the program director observes the horses owned by EATA at her ranch in Oregon. The program director and barn manager actively observe changes in gait, weight, temperament, and digestion; as well as, the health of the horse’s hoof, frog, eyes, ears, nose, and coat. Horses are vaccinated and teeth floated based on the recommendation of the veterinarian.

If there are any concerns, a veterinarian is contacted immediately. We also have an agreement with our Lessors that someone may contact a veterinarian and provide services, if they observe any concerns with our horses, while an EATA representative is off-site. If a medical issue arises, caregivers follow all veterinarian recommendations. This could include but is not limited to special wound care, dietary needs such as supplements, and/or special exercising plan.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     EATA will only euthanize a horse if it recommended by a licensed veterinarian. EATA would never euthanize a horse because of behaviors or a need for space.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     N/A: EATA does not participate in breeding practices.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: EATA does not participate in horse adoption therefore cannot provide an position on the concept of varying adoption fees.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 2

.

Location 1 of 2
William Clark Chamberlin Equestrian Center

3900 Abbott Road Anchorage AK 99507

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Anchorage Horse Council

2. Contact's Phone: 907-522-1552

3. Contact's Email: info@anchoragehorsecouncil.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Use

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: www.AnchorageHorseCouncil.com
Official Address:
3900 Abbott Road Anchorage,
AK 99511-2195
UNITED STATES
Payment / Street Address
PO Box 112195
Anchorage, AK 99511-2195
UNITED STATES

Phone Number (907) 522-1552
Fax Number (907) 522-1652

Rodeo Coordinator Frank W Koloski
rodeoalaska@gmail.com
Info / Comments / Concerns Nancy Burroughs
info@anchoragehorsecouncil.com
Event Coordinator Nancy Burroughs

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     EATA has an ongoing partnership with the Anchorage Horse Council (AHC) and the Municipality of Anchorage (MOA). The MOA owns the land the AHC leases, from which EATA operates. The AHC and EATA review its Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) annually to document the partnership agreement and address any concerns. Currently the lease lasts until 2029. EATA has not considered possibilities after 2029.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     The land owner, the Municipality of Anchorage (MOA) is not compensated for the lease of the land managed by the Anchorage Horse Council (AHC) and Equine Assisted Therapy Alaska (EATA). The AHC operates the equestrian event facility for use by equestrians around the state. Rodeo Alaska, Alaska Quarter-Horse Association, Hunter-Jumper Association, US Pony Club, Dressage, Trails/Cross-Country, the Alaska Youth Equestrian Club, and many other equestrian events are held at the WCCEC and managed by the AHC. Horses are not housed at the center unless there is an event ongoing and the owner/lessee is on the premise with the horse. The AHC charges for stall use and arena/facility area rentals. The AHC, in return, pays for manure removal, drags and waters the arenas, maintains the grounds (landscape, stalls, and trails), waste and portable restrooms, water, electricity, and so on. EATA has an MOU that describes the price structure agreement between the AHC and EATA. EATA pays for stalls and arena usage at a reduced cost on a monthly basis in exchange for the on-site supervision of EATA staff.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 3.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 2

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. 12-14 Outdoor Paddock Panes (4-5 bar panels); 12-14 enclosed metal and wood stalls (120 on-site); 2 – Arenas (schooling and main arenas) have 2-3” thick round metal fencing 3’-5’ high; 1 - Dressage arena with 1-2' high plastic fencing (not used for turnout or as an arena) EATA Arena is an enclosed fabric structure 75' x 120'; Tozier Western Arena – 4-5 bar paddock panel fencing 5-6’ high;

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     EATA horses are outdoors in the 12’x24’ paddock panel area during the day and inside the enclosed 10’x20’ stalls during the evening or during poor weather.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 12

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Sand surfaces are used in all arenas, except the dressage arena which has a special rock; there are two round pens that warm-up is conducted in the mornings or before sessions; activities are conducted in the EATA arena, which is also a sand arena and the highest level arena at the facility; the arenas are drained or not used if it is soaked/flooded; Trail-riding is conducted on trails that are not flooded and are clean, dry or damp, and free of rocks/obstacles; Gravel trail paths are used in areas with high traffic; Horses with shoes and are used to walking on gravel pathways are permitted to walk on these paths. These are larger rocks that make for a smooth, flat walkway. Woodchips are used in the pathways in-between barns and roadways to keep dust down.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     EATA is a member of the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl). EATA is currently undergoing program evaluation to become a PATH Intl. Premiere Accredited Center. EATA is also classified as a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. EATA reports to PATH Intl. and abides by their requirements as outlined in the PATH Intl. standards manual. EATA abides by state and federal laws regarding equine treatment, management, and liability requirements; as well as, nonprofit organization and corporate business requirements.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     A truck and 8-horse trailer is located on site.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? No

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     The program director and riding instructors inspect riding equipment for suitability for each horse and for any defects, flaws, and cleanliness that could be a safety issue at the beginning of the season, before and after each session, and at the end of the season prior to storing equipment for the winter. Volunteers clean tack and equipment and unrepairable equipment is discarded. Helmets have a 5-year lifespan and are cycled out of use after this time or after suspected weakening of the material for some reason (weather, overuse, dropped, etc.)

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Each horse's stall, paddock, halter, and lead rope are labeled with the horse's name. Tack, feed, and supplements specific to a horse are also identified in this way.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     EATA horses spend approximately 12 hours in their stall (7pm to 7am). Then they are moved to their paddocks to spend the remainder of the day. If the weather is unsuitable such as a hard rain, horses will be moved back to their stall. In case of a light rain, they are provided with their waterproof turn out blankets.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Supplements are used only at the direction of the owner, veterinarian, or program director. Horses are fed 20+ lbs of clean, dry, timothy hay each day in 2-4 feedings, depending on heath, workload, and weather. Grain is fed as needed, depending on health and workload.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The program director is skilled in understanding the Henneke Body Conditioning Score and determines the suitability of each horse for exercise and program use, as well as, increases or decreases in feeding.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Stalls/paddocks are cleaned at least twice per day. Manure is placed in a dump bin and is disposed of weekly by a waste management company (managed by the Anchorage Horse Council). We will call the veterinarian to remove carcasses.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Basic Emergency Procedures for Any Event at EATA’s WCCEC Facility The William Clark Chamberlin Equestrian Center (WCCEC) has a 30-foot fire break around all buildings to prevent wildfire, or building fire spread to the other (forest/building). It’s not impossible for fire to spread from one area to another in high winds. The most important things to remember in an emergency at the WCCEC are the following: 1. Stay Calm - This is the most important part, especially working with horses. - Don’t make large movements with your hands, yell and scream, or run while around the horses. 2. Know your Exits and Evacuate the Area - Have an idea where you need to go to evacuate yourself and those with disabilities from danger. - An eight (8) horse trailer is available to remove horses in the summer. This will only happen if necessary. - The horses can also be placed in the schooling arena and the turn-out areas if the barn is on fire. We want to remove them from the fire source and after further instruction from the smoke inhalation. 3. People First, Life before Materials - Remove yourself, participants, others unable to evacuate themselves (young, experiencing disabilities, injured, etc.). - Horse leaders unless you are the only one capable of removing a person from the area who is unable to do some him/herself, you are responsible for the horse. - If you need to assist another person, unhook the lead rope and let the horse take off, the horse will find a safer place to go (only do this if ABSOLUTELY necessary). There are 320 acres within the Ruth Arcand Park, and the horses are likely to go into the park, but busy roads surround EATA on all sides. The roads with the highest risks of them running into are Lake Otis and Abbott. - Side Walkers and Staff will take responsibility for the participant and get him/her immediately to safety or protect him/her with your body. 4. Notify Others - 911 in a severe emergency (unconscious person, fire larger than a trash can, downed horse that’s not getting up). - For all other emergencies notify head staff immediately. - Contact the veterinarian, for emergencies only involving the equine. - Head staff will inform owners/WCCEC board. - The volunteer office contains the EATA telephone and phone numbers. - If the phone is not working, go to the main office and call from the landline; there are phone numbers at each location. - Wait to be directed by staff on what to do. 5. For those certified in Equine/Human First Aid/CPR - Please direct others to notify head staff, 911, veterinarian, poison control, water/gas utilities, animal rescue, etc. - Immediately begin procedures to maintain life.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     On-premises caretaker 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Municipality of Anchorage Animal Care and Control 4711 Elmore Road Anchorage, AK 99507 Customer Service: 343-8122 / accs@muni.org Animal Control Dispatch: 343-8119 / acdispatch@muni.org To request a welfare check on an animal please contact Animal Control Dispatch at 343-8119.

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     PATH International Mailing Address: PO Box 33150 Denver, Colorado 80233 National Office Physical Address: 7475 Dakin Street Suite #600 Denver, CO 80221 www.pathintl.org (800) 369-RIDE (7433) Fax (303) 252-4610


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/27/2017

Veterinarian: Zachary Kiser

Clinic Name: The Mobile Moose    Street: P.O. Box 67074    City: Chugiak  State: AK    Zip: 99567

Phone: 907-330-7331    Email: mobilemooseinfo@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Janie Call

     2. Instructor: Samantha Lahti

     3. Instructor: Samantha Weiland


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 12.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 12

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 120

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:3. Expenses Additional Information 3b: estimate, was included in 3a, not broken out in expense reports 3e: Included in 3c 3f: Included in 3k arena rental fees and boarding fees (paid by the equestrian center) 3g: Included in 3a 3i: $9,337 $611 = Barn/Horse Help $2,909 = 10% of Executive Directors Salary (Part of duties) $5,817 = 20% of Program Directors Salary (Part of duties) 3k: $20,450 4,725 boarding 14,525 Transportation to/from Facility 1,200 Arena Rental 4. Summer Season Horses: 7 * 102 (Seven - Owned/Partially Leased in Winter; Penny, Jackie, and Hank - Owned; Ace - permanently free-leased to EATA; BB and Casper, free leased entire summer) - 714 days 1 * 98 CB (free-leased during summer) - 98 days 3 * 24 (Amber, Am.la, Thunder) (free-leased on specific days in summer) - 72 days 1 * 60 (rebel - free-leased during two months during summer) - 60 days -------- 12 Horses (3 owned; 1 owned/partial leased in winter; 1 donated permanently; 7 free-leased during the summer)

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 1 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

5 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 5 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

5 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            0 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$4369     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$1824     Bedding.

$1503     Veterinarian.

$1005     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$0     Medications & Supplements.

$8788     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$9337     Horse Care Staff.

$2116     Horse Training.

$20450     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$49392     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

944     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $52
Question 3 ($49,392 ) divided by Question 4 (944).

Average length of stay for an equine: 189 days
Question 4 (944) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (5).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Half of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 168

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 35

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 20

4. What is the average wait list time? 1 Years(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 4.00  Un-Mounted: 2.00  Total: 6

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 99%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed. Horses only work 3 hours (maximum) in EATA program sessions. Each horse is exercised/warmed-up in the morning and may be used in the evenings/weekends by owners. 4 hours is an average for mounted activity, as most owners only use their horses for an hour or two when they do use them in the evening to ride the trails on the grounds.



Location 2 of 2
Winter Boarding

62677 County Line Road Bend OR 97701

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Janie Call

2. Contact's Phone: 360-903-8052

3. Contact's Email: Janie.call@equineassistedtherapyalaska.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Use

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Janie Call
62677 County Line Road
Bend, Oregon 97701
360-903-8052
Janie.call@equineassistedtherapyalaska.org

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     September 2016 till May 2017 after this we will keep some horses in Alaska and send some back to OR to winter.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     During the winter Janie Call feeds, trains, and rides the horses so they will be ready for the summer program in Alaska. The owner is compensated through boarding fees for the horses.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 1.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 10

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Four indoor stalls with paddocks, 5 outdoor corrals three are 1 acre, one is 2 acres and one is 3 acres. There is also a round pen 24 foot and an arena 240 by 120. The fencing is poles and pasture fencing. We have one run in shed in the 3 acre corral.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     We place two horses together in the pastures and rotate horses in the barn depending on the weather.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 24

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     The footing is a sand base with a hard pack underneath. The footing is what the area uses for horses on the bend area. I also take them out into the BLM land for long trail rides and the footing is also sandy.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     N/A

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     We have trailers on the property so we can transport horses if there is an emergency.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     I fit the tack to each horse to ensure that they have the best equipment that I can provide for them.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     We have pictures of each horse with their picture and specific requirements for each horse.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     They are turned out during the winter and only use the stalls if weather is poor. They also have individual turn out blankets for light rain or cold weather.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     We feed an Equine senior feed with rice bran pellets and sometimes a pelleted hay. We add supplements as needed.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     I have a consultation with a veterinarian annually at a minimum and have them evaluated. We make a plan for each horse and their needs.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     We keep the facilities clean at all times. We clean stalls daily and remove the waste away from the horses. We also spray the grounds for bugs and set traps for rodents. Carcass removal plan is the plan the state has required. No burying and remove to the waste facility in the area.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Basic Emergency Procedures for Any Event at EATA's Winter Boarding Facility The Program Director, the boarding facility owner, has the right to make immediate decisions regarding the life and safety of the equines as long as the actions are reasonable and can be justified after the fact as in the best interests of equines and/or people. 1. Stay Calm - This is the most important part, especially working with horses. - Don’t make large movements with your hands, yell and scream, or run while around the horses. 2. Know your Exits and Evacuate the Area - Have an idea where you need to go to evacuate yourself and vulnerable populations from danger. - An eight (8) horse trailer is available to remove horses. 3. People First, Life before Materials - Remove people first from danger. - The horses have access to 10 acres and a covered area for their use. If there is an emergency that requires their removal, they will be placed in the trailer by the boarding facility members. 4. Notify Others - Boarding Facility staff will contact 911 or veterinarian in a severe emergency (unconscious person, fire larger than a trash can, downed horse that’s not getting up). - The boarding facility owner will contact EATA once the situation is contained. 5. For those certified in Equine/Human First Aid/CPR - Please direct others to notify head staff, 911, veterinarian, poison control, water/gas utilities, animal rescue, etc. - Immediately begin procedures to maintain life. The boarding facility owner will be/is certified in Equine and Human First Aid/CPR.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     We have a caretaker on premises at all times.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Central Oregon Humane Society 61170 S.E. 27th Street Bend, OR 97702 (541) 382-3537 Lt. Mark Eggert, 541-312-6003 After Business Hours or on weekends, 541-​693-6911 Derald McCall, 541-475-0314

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     PATH International Mailing Address: PO Box 33150 Denver, Colorado 80233 National Office Physical Address: 7475 Dakin Street Suite #600 Denver, CO 80221 (map) www.pathintl.org (800) 369-RIDE (7433) Fax (303) 252-4610


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/18/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Liz Pollak

Clinic Name: Bend Equine Medical Clinic    Street: 19121 Couch Market Road    City: Bend  State: OR    Zip: 97701

Phone: 541-388-4006    Email: bendequine@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Janie Call


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 5.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 5

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 8

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:3a: 1200 Hay; 82.65 grain + 98.79 grain 3k; winter boarding 12400; 1 horse is free-leased and EATA does not pay for his boarding; 4. Days (258 * 5 = 1290) 5 horses * Jan 1 - May 16; Sept 1 - Dec 31 J-31; F-28; M-31; A-30; M-16; S-30; Oct-31, N-30, D-31

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 0 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

5 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 5 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

5 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            0 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$1381     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$0     Veterinarian.

$140     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$0     Medications & Supplements.

$0     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$12400     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$13921     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

1290     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $11
Question 3 ($13,921 ) divided by Question 4 (1290).

Average length of stay for an equine: 258 days
Question 4 (1290) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (5).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 3 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Janie Call

         *Facility Participation:

         William Clark Chamberlin Equestrian Center

         Winter Boarding

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Intl Riding Instructors are trained and certified through both online courses and in-person workshops. Instructors must complete both written and performance testing prior to certification. PATH requires continuing education and yearly re-certification.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.This certification permits Janie Call to mentor riding instructors to become basic riding instructors for PATH Intl.

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Janie is a retired teacher who has worked with adults and children with disabilities. Additionally, Janie has over 30 years of equine experience regarding various riding disciplines and facets of horsemanship.


     2. *Instructor: Samantha Lahti

         *Facility Participation:

         William Clark Chamberlin Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Samantha Lahti may provide instruction under the direction of a certified riding instructor. She is currently exempt from the riding test but will take this final portion of the test in Fall 2017. She achieved her approval in May 2016 to be a basic riding instructor.

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Samantha is a licensed social worker whose primary profession is providing services to local veterans through the Veterans Administration. Samantha is primarily responsible for implementing EATA's veteran program.


     3. *Instructor: Samantha Weiland

         *Facility Participation:

         William Clark Chamberlin Equestrian Center

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2004

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Samantha received the Basic PATH Intl. Riding Instructor Certification in 2004.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2005

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Samantha received the Advanced PATH Intl. Riding Instructor Certification in 2005.

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Samantha has a Bachelors Degree in Equine Assisted Therapy and a Masters Degree in Education. Samantha's special area of focus is Autism. Samantha is a special education teacher traveling around Alaska.