×
LEARN MORE ABOUT US HERE
Our Work About Us Grants How to Apply Recipients Photo Credits
Equine Welfare Network Sign Up Here Equine Charity Network Alliance Guardians Champions Equine Education Network

Awards Equine Award Horse Stars Hall of Fame Humanitarian Award Klinger Award Research Fellowship
Get Involved Make a Donation #RideForHorses Join Here Winners Circle Best Performance Who's In! Attend an Event Establish a Horse Whisperers Fund

EQUUStars Partners News Contact Us Login Individual Organization

America's Horses
Need Our Protection!



Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue & Retirement

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 03/12/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Gail Ann Hirt

Employees:   Full-Time:  0  Part-Time:  0  Volunteers:  12

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue & Retirement (BTRE) is an all volunteer organization that is run by board members that have years of equine experience. New Volunteers are asked to have experience with horses. There are procedures and protocols that have been written that must be followed.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  2

Number of Board Members:  6  Number of Voting Board Members:  6

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement (BTRE) is an ALL VOLUNTEER organization that transitions thoroughbreds off the racetrack into new careers and all other breeds of horses, into approved, loving homes from all over the United States. Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement has many volunteers that have been, in the past, been involved in horse rescue and have years of experience rehabilitating, retraining and marketing thoroughbreds and other horses into new homes and careers. Without the help of BTRE, many of these horses would be sent to auctions where they would be picked up by kill buyers and sent to slaughter.

This group has been involved with thoroughbred and horse rescue with other 501c3 groups and each other. Racing trainers approach us when they don't have the time or they are unable to find homes for their horses, when they can no longer compete in racing. We also help horses that have been neglected, abused or unwanted. Many of these horses come to us severely underweight and in need of medical care. Veterinarians work with us to evaluate medical conditions when they first arrive at our farms.

In October 2012, BTRE rescued six (6) thoroughbreds that had recently raced and ended up in the hands of a kill buyer at an auction headed to a Canadian slaughterhouse and in January, 2013 rescued eight (8) thoroughbreds and a mustang that had been abandoned and were not being fed. In 2012 we were able to place 7 horses into new, pre-approved, loving home. We currently have 8 horses in our program awaiting new homes.

While building the horses up to good condition, experienced horse people work with them to evaluate their abilities to be riding horses. Many can be used for trail, dressage, jumping or for pasture companions. In the mean time, BTRE markets to fine them suitable homes.

Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement also assists racing owners and trainers and other people in need of help, in finding homes themselves, by listing horses on Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement's website at www.beyondtherosesequine.org . Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement volunteers talk with trainers and owners and take pictures and descriptions of horses they wish to sell. Often, if homes cannot be found, Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement is asked to take the horse into our program. These horses are taken to one of our farms or foster homes, where the horses are photographed with pictures and descriptions immediately posted to Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement's website. Funds for veterinary care and feed and general care are provided for by Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement.

Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement uses the internet, using Facebook and other horse rescue forums and blogs, to fundraise to help these horses. Funds are raised in accordance with the number of horses we take in. The internet resources are also used for marketing to find them homes. BTRE also applies to other organizations and foundations that provide grants to help these horses.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 2

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue & Retirement is an equine rescue and does not work with other non-horse related programs.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement (BTRE) accepts thoroughbreds off the racetrack and all other breeds of horses, regardless of medical condition. BTRE also assists private owners, thoroughbred racehorse owners and trainers, in finding non-race homes by listing non-competitive horses on our website. More often, we are asked to take the horse into the program. Trainers relinquish the Jockey Club registration papers when horses are donated to our program. Upon arrival into ours facility, horses are evaluated for soundness. Sound horses are photographed. Pictures and descriptions are immediately posted to BTRE’s website. The thoroughbreds then begins training and transition from racehorse to equine pet. Injured horses are given a medical evaluation, x-rays, if needed, and assessment. Horses that are in need of time off are placed into a BTRE approved foster home for rehabilitation. After the rehabilitation period, the horses begin their training for their new careers. While in training, BTRE horses are evaluated for their abilities so they can be matched up with an appropriate adopter. Anyone wishing to adopt a Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement horse must follow the following steps:
• The Pre-purchase Approval Questionnaire must be completed by the intended purchaser, who must be 18 years of age or older. It is returned to the Approval Chairperson.
• Approval of buyers is given by the Approval Chairperson or in consultation with members of the Approval Committee.
• If questions arise during the application process, the Approval Chairperson or designee will follow up with appropriate action. If there are still concerns, a farm visit is arranged.
• Applicants are expected to notify their veterinarians in advance that they will be contacted by a BTRE representative by fax or phone for a reference and completion of the Veterinary Reference Form.
• After return of the Veterinary Reference form with suitable ratings in all categories, the prospective buyer may be considered approved. If questions or concerns arise from the response of their veterinarian, the veterinarian is called for clarification. The Approval Committee may choose to do a farm visit to answer any questions raised by the veterinarian reference before considering approval of the buyer.

Approved buyers are encouraged to bring an experienced rider with them as many of these are ex-racehorses in training and should only be ridden by experienced riders. In the event the rider is inexperienced, BTRE suggests an experienced trainer work with them. Appointments are made to view the horses. Prospective buyers are encouraged to have a pre-purchase exam performed by a licensed Veterinary before adopting. Adopters must sign a Adoption LIFETIME ADOPTION BILL OF SALE. Adoption prices vary as to the ability of the horse ranging from pasture/companion, trail, flat only, good for all including jumping.

Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement’s Adoption LIFETIME ADOPTION BILL OF SALE protects the horse being adopted by emphasizing the following:
• BTRE horses may never be entered into a race for the remainder of its life.
• BTRE horses may not be bred for the durations of the horses life for the purpose of racing or any other purpose.
• If the horse is moved at any time from the approved farm, BTRE must be notified
• If for any reason, the adopter wishes to sell, lease or give away control of BTRE horse, BTRE has first right of refusal. If the adopter sells the BTRE horse, an Acceptance of Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement’s Bill Of Sale must be signed by the new adopter agreeing to follow BTRE’s Lifetime Bill of Sale.
• BTRE horses may not be sold at any auction.
• BTRE horses that are adopted are monitored. The adopter must send Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement an Update on the horse in 6 month increments for 2 years.
• BTRE horses must be vaccinated annually, kept on a regular worming schedule, hooves maintained and must maintain weight and condition as described by the Henneke Scoring System between Moderate (5) and Fleshy (7).

BTRE maintains files on each horse received into the program and data files are maintained on all horses and persons applying to adopt a horse. Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement is an ALL Volunteer organization to transition thoroughbreds off the racetrack and all other breeds of horses, providing medical care, rehabilitation, retraining and marketing to be adopted by approved homes.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     This group has been involved with thoroughbred and horse rescues, with other 501c3 groups and each other. Racing trainers approach us when they don’t have the time or they are unable to find homes for their horses, when they can no longer compete in racing. BTRE also works with the Michigan Horse Welfare Coalition and local County Animal Control’s. We have helped horses that have been neglected, abused or unwanted by taking them into our program. Many of these horses come to us severely underweight and in need of medical care. In January, 2013 we took in 9 horses that had been abandoned and not being fed by their owner and in March, 2013 BTRE took 3 horses into our program that had been seized by a local county Animal Control for abuse and neglect. BTRE also works with other Horse Welfare Groups by taking in and helping horses found in kill pens heading to slaughter houses at auctions such as Sugarcreek in Ohio and Shipshewana in Indiana. Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement also assists racing owners and trainers and other people in need of help, in finding homes themselves, by listing horses on our website.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     BTRE makes every effort to place horses that come into our program into loving homes. We accept horses in any condition and age. Horses that are dangerous or cannot live pain free without major pain relievers are euthanized humanely by our veterinarian. BTRE accepts a limited number of sanctuary horses if room and funds permit. They are fostered by approved homes with veterinary costs covered by the rescue. Occasionally, other approved retirement facilities offer to take our horses into their program. All of these horses are monitored for their care. BTRE uses the internet for recruiting new adopters. We also display our program and what we do at expos to attract potential adopters.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Upon arrival into Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement’s facility, horses are evaluated for health and soundness issues. Horses needing special attention are given a medical evaluation by our veterinarians. They receive x-rays and any other tests needed to evaluate their condition. When horses arrive they receive vaccinations, hoof care, dental care and are wormed. If needed, they are placed in quarantine for the time needed. Coggins are pulled on every horse. Horses that are in need of time off are placed into a Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement approved foster home for rehabilitation. After the horses have settled in, if they are able, they are ridden and evaluated by our trainer to be assessed for their riding abilities. They are then placed on our website for adoption.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Horses that come into our program are kept in stalls at night and out during the day. Each horse is handled numerous times a day and checked to make sure they are alright. BTRE horses are vaccinated upon arrival to our program with all necessary vaccines for the area, including Potomac and West Niles. They all received vaccines in the spring, fall and as needed. BTRE rotates wormers on a bi-monthly basis to keep the horses free of parasites.

When arriving at BTRE, all horses are separated from the other horses until evaluated. At risk horses are kept in stalls and smaller paddocks until well enough to join the herd. They are placed on a special feeding program to suit their needs and monitored very closely. These horses are not made available for adoption until they are suitable for adoption. Geriatric horses are monitored closely for weight loss and special needs. If they are accepted by other horses, they are turned out during the day with them. If not, they will be placed in a separate paddock. If they are able to be ridden or used for a companion, BTRE makes every attempt to find a home for them. Horses that come into the BTRE program and considered dangerous or have injuries that leave them in constant pain that cannot be relieved, will be euthanized humanely.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     BTRE makes every effort to place every horse that comes into our program. We have trainers that will work with difficult horses until able to be placed and BTRE makes sure that, if adopted, the horse is placed into a home that is knowledgeable in handling difficult horses. If a horse is dangerous to humans or other horses, in handling and/or riding, BTRE will euthanize the horse humanely. BTRE will also euthanize a horse if it cannot be kept free of constant pain.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue & Retirement has a “no Breeding” policy, which is included in our adoption certificate, where horses are not allowed to be bred for pleasure, show or racing. BTRE does not usually accept stallions. If a stallion is accepted, he is immediately castrated. There are no exceptions. Any mares that are taken in by BTRE that are pregnant are closely monitored and cared for. Once the foal is born, they are separated from the other horses. The foals remain with their mothers a minimum of 5 months before they are placed into homes.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     Yes

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training? 
     Occasionally Michigan State University will euthanize a horse for us. In these cases, they have our permission to use the carcasses, after euthanizing, to use for training purposes for the student in their veterinary program.

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     Yes

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     Foster homes are asked to complete the same adoption application as persons wanting to adopt our horses. Veterinary references and personal references are requested and a visit is made to the farm to verify the care of the horses currently housed there. Once placed in the foster homes, the horses are monitored by the rescue on a regular basis to verify that the horse is being cared for properly. Foster homes are asked to follow the procedures and policies of the rescue,

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: $751 to $1,000

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine level of training.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine age.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine health and soundness.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization approves of this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 2

.

Location 1 of 2
Gail Hirt - Main Farm for Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue

11621 Bryce Road Emmett MI 48022

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Gai Hirt

2. Contact's Phone: 586-321-6780

3. Contact's Email: gail@beyondtherosesequine.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Same as above

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     This facility is privately owned by the Executive Director of Beyond The Roses Equine. An 8 year lease has been signed between the Rescue and the owners of the property.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     The Rescue has full use of all buildings, paddocks and facilities of the property for $1 per year. The property is maintained by the owners of the property.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 1.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 11

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. One pasture, four paddocks, 2 small turnouts 35'x50', with wire farm fence, posts 8 to 15 feet apart with top boards and electro braide hot wire on top. 1 12'x24' run-ins, one 18'x22' coverall, 36'x48' barn with 6 stalls.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     The mares are kept separate from the geldings. The mares have access to 2 paddocks, one with a 12'x24' run in and can be separated if necessary. The geldings have access to 2 paddocks, on with an 18'x22' coverall and the pasture. New additions to the program are kept separate from the others in the small turn outs until they have adjusted and can be turned out with the others. The geldings have access to the two paddocks year round and the pasture only in the summer. BTRE does not usually take in stallions, but when we do, they are kept with our trainer at Whispering Point farm until he can be placed.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 8

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     This farm is used for horses coming into the program until they are evaluated. There is a 60' round pen to work with the horses. If rehabilitation is needed, they are kept at this farm or our other farm. Once they begin their training, they are sent to our trainer at Whispering Point Farm.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Before starting Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue in 2012, I was previously an Executive Board Member for CANTER Michigan. I was an approved foster home for them and over the 9 years I belonged to that organization, I fostered 42 horses for them.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     The Executive Director live at this facility. A 3 horse slant trailer is kept on the property. Her truck is always ready for an emergency trip. Our Veterinarian, Blue Water Equine Hospital, is right across the street if needed.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? No

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Every horse is provided with his own halter and blanket and brushes and only used by that horse. The horses are not ridden at this facility. When they are ready to be ridden, they are place with our trainer at Whispering Point Farm.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Each horse is provided with a halter and name tag attached to the halter upon coming into the program. A binder is kept with all descriptions, pictures and medical records or each horse on the property. Each stall has a tag with the horses name, a picture and feeding instructions for that horse.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Horses that are stall bound are kept in stalls that are well lit with good ventilation. The are check no less than 4 times daily to assure their food and water is adequate. Horses that have been evaluated by the veterinarian and are allowed to be walked, are hand walked twice a day for a minimum of 20 minutes per walk for exercise. Horses that are allowed to be turned out alone in small turnout, are allowed to be placed into our 35'x55' turnouts for short periods of time to exercise themselves.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Food a) Horses that have been starved and on Henneke Scale of 2 or less i) Have the horse evaluated by a veterinarian for condition. Have a fecal test done to check for worms. Have teeth checked. Take intake photos of the horse’s body condition. Measure the horse’s weight with a weight tape. ii) Days 1 – 3: Feed one pound (approximately 1/6 flake) of high quality alfalfa every four hours (total of 6 pounds per day in 6 feedings). Contact a veterinarian to evaluate the medical status of the horse. iii) Days 4 – 10: Slowly increase the amount of alfalfa and decrease the number of feedings so that by day 6 you are feeding just over 4 pounds of hay every 8 hours (total of 13 pounds per day in 3 feedings). iv) Days 10 and for several months Feed as much alfalfa as the horse will eat and decrease feeding to twice a day. Provide access to a salt block. Do NOT feed grain, treats such as apples or carrots, or other supplements until the horse is well along in its recovery. Each feeding of grain, treats or any supplements complicates the return of normal metabolic function and can result in death. v) Provide fresh, clean water at all times vi) Deworming and correction of dental problems is very beneficial to the horse’s recovery. vii) Other types of hay such as grass may be added following the first 2 weeks of refeeding, but these should be added slowly over time. Alfalfa hay contains adequate amounts of salt for a sedentary horse, so use caution in offering a salt block within the first 4 to 6 weeks. b) Thoroughbred racehorses are fed much more grain than the average show or pleasure horse. They sometimes received as much as 18 to 20 pounds per day while racing to meet their high energy requirements. Off the track thoroughbreds will need a lot of calories to keep up their weight when first coming off the track. As many as 80% of thoroughbreds coming off the track will also have ulcers to some degree from the everyday stress of racing. This could have an effect on their weight maintenance also. i) When first coming into BTRE, a thoroughbred coming off the track shall be feed a Senior feed with a higher fat content. Many of the horses of BTRE receive Nutrena Safe Choice Senior Feed. Senior feed is easier for them to digest. A) Upon arriving, offer them 3 pounds of sweet feed grain three times daily, since this is what most are provide with at the track. Make dietary changes with these horses as gradual as possible to avoid colic. B) After a couple days, increase by ½ pound feed per feeding. At this time start changing them over to Senior feed. C) After two weeks they are generally receiving 10 to 12 pounds of Senior feed split between 2 feedings. D) If they are thin or possibly loosing weight at this time, begin adding a fat supplement to their diet. (a) Up to 2 cups of vegetable oil, soaked shredded or pelleted beet pulp, 1 to 2 pounds of Amplify are good fat additives. ii) Feeding higher-calorie hay, such as one containing alfalfa, will help them retain more pounds with less grain. In Michigan a good second cutting with a little alfalfa will help with maintaining weight. Many OTTBs will lose weight if fed a grass timothy first cutting. A) Don’t give them any more than they will eat, but provide hay to them ALL DAY. Most will eat one half to 2/3 of a bale of Hay each day. If feeding alfalfa hay, the amounts can be less. B) Race horses are fed their hay in large hay bags hanging in their stall doorway. Avoid feeding them on the ground when arriving. At the racetrack, they have been bedded in straw and are not used to shavings. Most will spread the hay around their stall and use it for bedding. After they begin turnout, start offering them hay on the ground. c) Other breeds of horses are not usually fed the amounts that thoroughbreds are fed. Diets of individual horses shall be of a quality, quantity and variety to match the physiological and psychological state of the individual as each equine changes over time, with consideration for the age, life stage, species, condition and size of the horse. i) Diets of pregnant or lactating mares shall be adjusted as needed to meet their increased nutritional needs. ii) Feed shall be wholesome, palatable and free from contamination and of sufficient quantity and nutritive value to maintain all horses in good health. iii) The rescue shall utilize a feeding regimen that ensures each individual horse receives adequate nutrition regardless of status in its social group. iv) Each horse’s dietary needs shall be documented. v) Forage shall be made available to horses such as hay pasture or hay products. vi) Where natural forage is not available or insufficient in quality or quantity, good quality hay and/or hay products shall be used to supplement the diet. d) Supplements shall be offered (including vitamins and minerals) only after being reviewed and approved by a veterinarian and the rescue. e) Feeding and drinking receptacles shall be placed in positions that minimize the risks of contamination from soiling by the horses themselves, wild birds, rodents and other potentially invasive species, such as opossum or raccoons. f) Feed receptacles shall be appropriate for the horses in terms of number, size and placement and are cleaned as needed. g) Receptacles for feed and water shall be designed to minimize spillage and are not used for any other purpose. h) To reduce waste, potential contamination and risk of colic or disease/parasite transmission, horses shall not be fed directly on the ground without a receptacle. i) Horses shall be fed a minimum of twice daily, early morning and late in the day with sufficient hours between to allow for necessary forage time. j) Hay shall be provided at multiple feeding sites throughout the outside paddocks to ensure that all horses have access and to reduce or eliminate aggression that results from competition for food. If there is competition between the horses, they shall be separated for feeding. k) Diet increases or decreases shall be made in modest increments gradually. l) Underweight horses that are experiencing health or behavior problems shall be separated for supplemental feedings as needed. m) If a horse fails to survive, the quantity, quality and availability of feed, and the health of the horse should be evaluated. n) Horses shall be maintained on the Henneke Scale scoring between 4 and 7.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The Henneke Body Conditioning Score is used by Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue for evaluating and maintaining a horses body condition. Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue likes to maintain their horses at a Body Score of 5. Feed amounts and exercise are adjusted accordingly to reach that goal for each horse and maintain them there. Each horse, if allowed, is exercised daily.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Biosecurity a. Minimize the impact of pest, disease, invasive plants and animals, chemical use and residue. b. Outdoor enclosures shall be check regularly for potential water contamination and soil contaminants. c. National, state and local guideline methods for disposal of sewage, toxic/hazardous materials, garbage and equine waste shall be followed. d. Surveillance ensures early detection of animal diseases. e. Isolation should be used for sick animals and should have the highest level of biosecurity protocols in place. The following are components of an effective isolation: i. NO contact with any other horses ii. Wash hands prior to going in and coming out of pens and stalls. iii. If in a stall, have at the end of the row and with an empty stall beside the isolation stall. iv. Have separate waterers, feed bins and buckets for isolation horses. Clean and disinfect daily. v. Have non porous (rubber) boots identified as isolation boots. Clean and disinfect them prior to going into isolation and upon exit from isolation. Consider using disposable booties also. vi. Label equipment, including halter, shovel, bucket, blanket, bridle, etc. as ISOLATION and with the horse name. vii. Keep isolation equipment in a closed bin directly outside the quarantine stall or pen. Disinfect the outside every time it is opened. viii. Post signs outside of isolation pens and stalls indicating isolation status and restricted access. Signs are most effective if posted a bit away from the stall or pen versus directly on the stall. ix. Have coveralls specifically for use in isolation 1. Label them and launder them after each use or animal 2. Keep a covered isolation laundry bin directly outside isolation. Wash Isolation laundry with detergent and bleach. Wear gloves when transferring to washer. Remember to label the washer as Isolation. 3. Keep clean “ISOLATION” coveralls in a closed bin and outside the isolation area for quick access. 4. Horses should not leave isolation until cleared by a veterinarian as being safe to return to general population. Some horses may still be infectious even if they are not showing clinical signs. 5. All facility use is off limits to protect other horses in the facility. f. Best Practice: Use disposable coveralls and dispose of them after each use, in a covered isolation garbage. Post biosecurity signs at barn and pasture entrances. Additional signage may benefit specific cases, such as outside the stall of a new horse. g. Best Practice: Restrict pets’ access to horses in different access zones. Whether they are from the neighbors, visitors or stray animals, they can present a risk for transmitting disease from groups of horses or farm to farm.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Emergency Disaster Plan - Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Retirement Tornadoes, floods and fire are the most common natural disasters in the state of Michigan. Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue set goals and plans to be prepared for these situations. The following steps have been set up to help keep an emergency from becoming a disaster. Before The Storm – Being Prepared 1) Survey your property to find the best location to confine the horses for each type of disaster and a route to route to get them to this location. 2) Check for water sources in case power is lost and pumps and automatic waterers are not working after the disaster. 3) Have extra halters and lead lines in a separate location with easy access with permanent tags with the horses name, your name and phone number. Samples of tags include: a) A leather halter with the horses name/farm information in a zip lock bag secured to the halter with duct tape. b) A luggage tag with the horse/farm name and phone number braided into the tail. (Make sure this is water proof). c) Can of paint or an auction crayon to paint your phone number on the horse when time is limited 4) Maintain a binder with all the horse’s records that can be easily obtained. The binder should include the following: a) Pictures of each horse b) Records of age, sex, breed, color, identifying marks. c) Vaccination records d) Copy of Coggins e) Special feeding instructions 5) Prepare an emergency kit and keep is a separate location with easy access. The emergency kit should include: a) Plastic barrel with lid b) Water bucket c) Tool Kit with pry bar and duct tape d) Leg wraps e) Fire resistant non-nylon leads and halters f) First aid kit g) Flashlight and extra batteries h) Sharp knife i) Wire cutters j) Tarps k) Keep bleach on hand to add to contaminated water if necessary. To purify water add two drops of chlorine bleach per gallon of water and let stand 30 minutes l) Generator with extra fuel 6) Have a first aid kit containing the following items: a) Cotton rolls b) Contact bandage c) Vet wrap d) Gauze pads, assorted sized e) Gauze wrap f) Adhesive wrap and adhesive tape g) Leg wraps h) Sharp scissors i) Steel cup or container j) Equine thermometer k) Surgical scrub and antiseptic solution l) Latex gloves m) Permanent markers n) Flashlight and extra batteries o) Pliers (to pull nails) p) Fly spray 7) Plan which horses will be saved first in the event that all animals cannot be moved 8) Keep vaccinations and coggins up to date annually on all the horses. This includes the tetanus toxoid vaccine, West Nile virus and Eastern/Western Encephalitis vaccinations. 9) Prevention: a) Prohibit smoking in and around the barn b) Inspect electrical systems regularly c) Keep barn clean and free of dust, cobwebs, trash, oily tack or hoof cleaning rags and soiled papers towels. d) When possible, do not store bedding materials or hay in the horse barn 10) Keep aisles, stall doors and barn doors free of debris and equipment 11) Mount fire extinguishers at each entrance and around the stable 12) Share your evacuation plan with neighbors and friends. 13) Have a backup plan in case it’s impossible to take your horses when you evacuate. Consider different types of disasters and whether your horses would be better off in a barn or loose in a field. Evacuation 1) Should horses be left in the pasture or placed in the barn? If the pasture has good fencing and limited trees, it is probably best to leave the horses outside. Well constructed pole-barns or concrete block barns may provide safety from flying debris, but the horses may become trapped if the wind collapses the building. a) Electrical lines: keep horses out of pastures with power lines b) Trees with shallow roots will fall easily under high force winds and can injure the horse or destroy the fencing c) Fencing: Do not keep horses in barbed wire or electric fencing during a storm. Turn off electrical fencing before the storm. 2) Water a) Each horse should have 122 to 20 gallons per day stored b) Fill garbage cans with plastic liners and fill all water troughs c) Have a generator to run the well if you have a large number of horses 3) Feed Storage a) Store a minimum of 72 hours of feed and hay (7 days is best). It is very possible that the roads will be closed because of down power lines and trees, limiting access to feed stores. Cover hay with water proof tarps and place it on palates. Keep grain in water tight containers. 4) Be aware that horses tend to run back into burning barns out of fear and confusion, as it is their safe zone. After The Storm 1) Carefully inspect each horse for injury to eyes and limbs 2) Be careful about leaving horses unattended outside. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and horses could become easily confused. 3) Walk the pasture to remove debris. Make sure that no Red Maple tree branches fell in the pasture. Just a few wilted leaves are very toxic to horses. Clinical signs of Red Maple toxicity are dare chocolate colored gums, anorexia and red urine. 4) Inspect the property for downed power lines and trees 5) Take pictures of storm damage 6) If your horse is missing, contact the local animal control or disaster response team. 7) Work in pairs when approaching and handling frightened horses.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The public are not allowed to access the property where the horses are kept unless invited. The Executive Director lives on the property where the horses are kept.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     St. Clair County Animal Control 3378 Griswold Road Port Huron, MI 48060 Phone: (810) 984-3155

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Our organization has not, to this point, had to have any contact with any other authorities regarding horse welfare.


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 01/31/2017

Veterinarian: Dr, Jessica Younk

Clinic Name: Blue Water Equine Hospital    Street: 3996 Keegan    City: Emmett  State: MI    Zip: 48022

Phone: 810-384-1100    Email: younk@bluewaterequinehospital.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Martha Denver


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 11.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 11

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 20

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Dental is included in Veterinary costs

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 2 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

11 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

0 = Total of 2d-2f

11 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            1 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            10 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$26392     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$3803     Bedding.

$1765     Veterinarian.

$5428     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$1211     Medications & Supplements.

$757     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$39356     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

3734     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $11
Question 3 ($39,356 ) divided by Question 4 (3734).

Average length of stay for an equine: 339 days
Question 4 (3734) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (11).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses?

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-All of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.



Location 2 of 2
Whispering Point Farm

2611 Bowman Road Imlay City MI 48444

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Martha Denver

2. Contact's Phone: 810-614-8122

3. Contact's Email: revned71@aol.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Same as above

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   No

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Whispering Point Farm is a boarding and training facility. The horses of Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue are boarded while while receiving training on a monthly basis.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     The owner of Whispering Point Farm is also a trainer. She is paid a monthly fee per horse for board and training.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 0.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 22

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. This is a boarding and training facility with 9 paddocks with 4 board fencing. Each paddock has run-in sheds. There is a barn with 30 stalls and a 100'x160' riding arena. There is also a dedicated riding arena outside used for riding and jumping horses.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Whispering Point Farm has paddocks that are dedicated to mares or gelding. This facility matches up horses that get along with each other. Weather permitting, they are turned out by day for approximately 6-8 hours and brought in by night.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 8

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     This facility has an outside and inside arena with sand footing. The inside arena is 100'x160' with sand footing. Horses are ridden for exercise, training and jumping in both arenas.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     This facility is owned by a well know local trainer. In previous years it has also been utilized by CANTER MI as their main barn.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     The owner lives on the property and has numerous horse trailers kept there that are available for transport in an emergency. Dr. Moore, the attending veterinarian is also available 24/7 and is lives fifteen minutes from the site.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     tack, blankets, brushes and saddle pads are provided for all horses belonging to the rescue at this facility

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Each horse belonging to Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue at this facility are provided with a halter and name tag attached to the halter. A binder belonging to the rescue contains all descriptions, pictures, medical records and feeding instructions on each horse.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Whispering Point Farm does not house horses belonging to the rescue that are stall bound. These horses are housed at the other two locations of Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Horses that are taken to our trainer at Whispering Point Farm are in good condition and ready to go into training. The owner follows our feeding instructions to maintain the horse in this condition. Board members visit the horses taken here for training on a weekly basis in order to check and maintain the condition of the horses of Beyond The Roses Equine.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The Henneke Body Conditioning Score is used by Beyond The Rosees Equine Rescue for evaluating and maintaining a horse's body condition. Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue like to maintain their horses at a Body Score of 5. Feed amounts and exercise are adjusted accordingly to reach that goal for each horses and maintain them there. Each horse at this location is exercised daily.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Whispering Point Farm follows the procedures set forth by Beyond The Roses Equine Farm for Biosecurity, which is: a. Minimize the impact of pest, disease, invasive plants and animals, chemical use and residue. b. Outdoor enclosures shall be check regularly for potential water contamination and soil contaminants. c. National, state and local guideline methods for disposal of sewage, toxic/hazardous materials, garbage and equine waste shall be followed. d. Surveillance ensures early detection of animal diseases. e. Isolation should be used for sick animals and should have the highest level of biosecurity protocols in place. The following are components of an effective isolation: i. NO contact with any other horses ii. Wash hands prior to going in and coming out of pens and stalls. iii. If in a stall, have at the end of the row and with an empty stall beside the isolation stall. iv. Have separate waterers, feed bins and buckets for isolation horses. Clean and disinfect daily. v. Have non porous (rubber) boots identified as isolation boots. Clean and disinfect them prior to going into isolation and upon exit from isolation. Consider using disposable booties also. vi. Label equipment, including halter, shovel, bucket, blanket, bridle, etc. as ISOLATION and with the horse name. vii. Keep isolation equipment in a closed bin directly outside the quarantine stall or pen. Disinfect the outside every time it is opened. viii. Post signs outside of isolation pens and stalls indicating isolation status and restricted access. Signs are most effective if posted a bit away from the stall or pen versus directly on the stall. ix. Have coveralls specifically for use in isolation 1. Label them and launder them after each use or animal 2. Keep a covered isolation laundry bin directly outside isolation. Wash Isolation laundry with detergent and bleach. Wear gloves when transferring to washer. Remember to label the washer as Isolation. 3. Keep clean “ISOLATION” coveralls in a closed bin and outside the isolation area for quick access. 4. Horses should not leave isolation until cleared by a veterinarian as being safe to return to general population. Some horses may still be infectious even if they are not showing clinical signs. 5. All facility use is off limits to protect other horses in the facility. f. Best Practice: Use disposable coveralls and dispose of them after each use, in a covered isolation garbage. Post biosecurity signs at barn and pasture entrances. Additional signage may benefit specific cases, such as outside the stall of a new horse. g. Best Practice: Restrict pets’ access to horses in different access zones. Whether they are from the neighbors, visitors or stray animals, they can present a risk for transmitting disease from groups of horses or farm to farm.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Tornadoes, floods and fire are the most common natural disasters in the state of Michigan. Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue and Whispering Point Farm set goals and plans to be prepared for these situations. The following steps have been set up to help keep an emergency from becoming a disaster. Before The Storm – Being Prepared 1) Survey your property to find the best location to confine the horses for each type of disaster and a route to route to get them to this location. 2) Check for water sources in case power is lost and pumps and automatic waterers are not working after the disaster. 3) Prepare an emergency kit and keep is a separate location with easy access. 4) Have a first aid kit. 5) Plan which horses will be saved first in the event that all animals cannot be moved 6) Keep vaccinations and coggins up to date annually on all the horses. This includes the tetanus toxoid vaccine, West Nile virus and Eastern/Western Encephalitis vaccinations. 7) Prevention: a) Prohibit smoking in and around the barn b) Inspect electrical systems regularly c) Keep barn clean and free of dust, cobwebs, trash, oily tack or hoof cleaning rags and soiled papers towels. d) When possible, do not store bedding materials or hay in the horse barn 8) Keep aisles, stall doors and barn doors free of debris and equipment 9) Mount fire extinguishers at each entrance and around the stable 10) Share your evacuation plan with neighbors and friends. 11) Have a backup plan in case it’s impossible to take your horses when you evacuate. Consider different types of disasters and whether your horses would be better off in a barn or loose in a field.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     Whispering Point Farm is a privately owned boarding stable. Persons owning horses there can come and go at will during normal business hours to see their horses. The public is not encouraged to visit the farm unless invited. New comers must check in with the owner upon arrival. Whispering Point Farm maintains a gate at the only entrance to the farm. The owner lives on the property.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Lapeer Animal Control 2396 W Genesee St. Lapeer, MI 48446 Phone:(810) 667-0236

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Our organization has not, to this point, had to have any contact with any other authorities regarding horse welfare.


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 01/31/2017

Veterinarian: Jessica Younk

Clinic Name: Blue Water Equine Hospital    Street: 3996 Keegan Road    City: Emmett  State: MI    Zip: 48022

Phone: 810-384-1100    Email: younk@bluewaterequinehospital.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 2.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 30

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 30

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Farrier, feed, bedding included in Horse training

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 33 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 2 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

40 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 24 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 4 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 5 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

33 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            7 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$0     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$14616     Veterinarian.

$840     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$0     Medications & Supplements.

$0     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$43245     Horse Training.

$4822     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$63523     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

3600     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $18
Question 3 ($63,523 ) divided by Question 4 (3600).

Average length of stay for an equine: 90 days
Question 4 (3600) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (40).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-All of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Martha Denver

         *Facility Participation:

         Gail Hirt - Main Farm for Beyond The Roses Equine Rescue

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Martha has been riding for over 30 years. She has owned Whispering Point Farm for over 12 years. Martha shows in most level of shows in dressage, hunter jumper and eventing. She has attended many clinics to improve her abilities but has not actually received certification with any organization. Martha Denver is very good with handling the horses and starts them out as if they know nothing, working them up to a discipline they are suited for. She then markets them for us to help us find homes and matches the horses up with suitable owners.