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ReRun

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 05/01/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Lisa Molloy - Executive Director

Employees:   Full-Time:  2  Part-Time:  3  Volunteers:  

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. ReRun has written job descriptions for all paid positions. New staff receive a new worker orientation meeting. The Board President and Treasurer facilitate this meeting. The Board President is responsible for the supervision of all staff. Volunteers are recruited, trained and supervised only for the Moneighs For Rerun aspect.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  4

Number of Board Members:  13  Number of Voting Board Members:  13

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Rerun Thoroughbred Adoption offers rehab, retraining and adoption thorough it's premier adoption facility located in central New York. In addition, our MD farm provides permanent sanctuary to a select number of horses that are unable to go onto second careers. Dave - NY's 2008 Turf Horse of the Year is one of many that call the MD sanctuary farm home. Rerun is a proud partner of the NYTHA's Take The Lead program and a member of the HSUS Homes for Horses Coalition in addition to being a TAA accredited organization. Rerun works alongside the NY Breeders and Development Fund and participates in activities with Cazenovia College and Cornell Cooperative Extension. Rerun was recently awarded a Forever Foundation scholarship to further education of it's staff and was designated as the recipient of the 2016 TCA Merit Award for the state of NY by NYTB.

Rerun also operates Moneighs For Rerun - Moneighs are paintings made by horses to benefit the Rerun Thoroughbred Adoption Program. They are collectible works of art personally painted by horses and are trademarked. In all, 15 Kentucky Derby winners, 10 Preakness winners and eight Belmont Stakes winners have taken part in the painting of Moneighs throughout the years but American Pharoah is the crown jewel of that collection as the first Triple Crown winner to create a Moneigh.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 2

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. NA

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Rerun is primarily an adoption program specifically for Thoroughbreds so horses accepted must have the prognosis of being at least sound for trail riding - we do not accept pasture pets or companion animals. Horses must be able to be identified as a Thoroughbred either by tattoo or registration number. Horses are never turned away based on the owners inability or unwillingness to donate financially provided they meet the other criteria stated above.

Horses upon arrival are quarantined, treated for ulcers and monitored for 7 days and then are vaccinated, de-wormed and have their feet reset. They then have an evaluation depending on what vet records we receive with them and this includes x rays, ultrasounds and flexion tests. Some horses may be scheduled for surgery if they have a favorable prognosis and we incorporate other therapies such as shock wave, acupuncture and chiropractic where needed.

Once they have adjusted to their new routines, are sound, have gained weight and are comfortable on turnout, we will start the re-training process which typically includes 3 to 4 training rides per week, Horses have high quality photos and videos taken and are then marketed for adoption via our website and social media. Adoption fees range from zero up to $2500. All applicants must be approved and we do not adopt out to first time horse owners, children or novices. Adoption contracts are for 1 year upon which ownership transfers to the adopter if we are in receipt of 3 satisfactory updates throughout the first year. The horse can be returned at any time throughout it's life to Rerun for any reason.

Horses that have continuing soundness issues and in some cases behavioral problems that make them unadoptable are typically pensioned at our sanctuary farm unless the horse is in chronic pain or a danger to itself, handlers or other horses and then based on consultation with 3 vets, the determination is made to euthanize the horse.

Currently we try to maintain no more 10 sanctuary horses and 30 horses in training based on our budget and facility capacity.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Rerun does not purchase horses - horses typically come directly from the track by way of owner/trainer donation and track based programs such as NYTHA's Take The Lead. When we have had low numbers, we have taken horses from free listings on Craigslist and Facebook and also offered spots in the program for auction horses that have been purchased and that the buyer would like to donate.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Horses that cannot be adopted are then offered permanent sanctuary if their circumstances permit. Some horses that are at a greater risk of being repeatedly sold at the end of the one year contract are placed with lifetime contracts which means they can never be sold, leased or traded and only returned directly to Rerun. Every horse that leaves the program goes with a contract which also contains a no auction/no slaughter clause. All Rerun horses can be returned at anytime for any reason.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Horses upon arrival are quarantined, treated for ulcers and monitored for 7 days and then are vaccinated, de-wormed and have their feet reset. They then have an evaluation depending on what vet records we receive with them and this includes x rays, ultrasounds and flexion tests. Some horses may be scheduled for surgery if they have a favorable prognosis and we incorporate other therapies such as shock wave, acupuncture and chiropractic where needed. Coggins and blood work are pulled as needed.

Horses are not ridden until they are eating well, gaining weight and are comfortable on turn out. This can be anywhere from 6 weeks to 6 months.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Every Rerun horse is vaccinated within the first 2 weeks of arrival with 6 way and rabies - wnv and EEE are then boostered every 3 months if the horse remains in the program. In NY we also vaccinate for Potomac as it is endemic to the area.

Horses are de-wormed within the first 2 weeks of arrival with ivemectin and then every 6 weeks on rotation. The TAA noted ReRun for "best practices" for our de-worming and vaccination program.

All horses are evaluated by the vet and a plan is made based on x rays and other diagnostic testing. Horses that have injuries that cannot be helped by surgery or stall rest and other therapies are then either pensioned as sanctuary horses or if the condition is very limiting in terms of quality of life, they are euthanized once their records have been evaluated by three weeks, 2 of which are orthopedic surgeons.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Rerun follows the AAEP guidelines on euthanasia and decisions pertaining to orthopedic issues are usually made based on a joint review of the horse's records by 3 vets - 2 of which are orthopedic surgeons. In emergency situations, the decision is made by the facility manager and the attending vet and all vets are required to document for the record the situation surrounding the need to euthanize. The TAA noted ReRun for "best practices" for their euthanasia policy.

Horses that are healthy but can be difficult prospects to place can usually be allocated a sanctuary spot unless the horse is a danger to itself, other horses or staff.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     Rerun has a no breeding policy and does not accept foals, pregnant mare or intact males except in extenuating circumstances in which case, the horse will be gelded within the first 2 weeks of arrival at a facility. Intact males can only be handled by facility managers and can only be turned out in areas where they do not share fence lines with other horses.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training? 
     NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: $751 to $1,000

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine level of training.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine age.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine type.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine health and soundness.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization approves of this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: A young sound horse that is a potential upper level competition prospect holds more market value plus has a reduced amount of time at the facility. Fees from these horses helps offset the cost of keeping those that the public deem less desirable or those that came without any type of financial support.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 2

.

Location 1 of 2
Long Lane Farm Adamstown MD

Buckeystown Pike Adamstowm MD 21710

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Kenny Schoo

2. Contact's Phone: 301-401-9827

3. Contact's Email: schoo1155@gmail.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Use

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Mr Schoo

As above

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     We have a month to month standard boarding contract with the farm for each individual horse which meets TAA requirements.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     We pay a fixed rate for pasture board which also includes hay and farrier, vet services and any additionals that the horses may require are billed separately.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 0.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 200

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. There are several hundred acres, mainly divided into larger pastures all with board fencing and shelters. There are some small paddocks and an isolation area for newly arriving horses to be quarantined before introduction into a larger herd. In addition, there are a few stalls for horses that have either been injured or have some kind of acute issue such as an abscess. All horses have access to home produced round bales.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Mr Schoo has enough land that he can rotate as required and often leaves pastures empty to cut hay from which is his primary business.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 24

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     This is a sanctuary farm only and does not provide any training or equine related activities. All horses live out 24/7. Unless they can be comfortably maintained like that, they are not sent.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     The premises were inspected this year on August 1st by the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance and was found to be compliant in their published standards.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     A truck and trailer is available at all times

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     As this is a sanctuary only farm, the horses only have named halters

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     3 of the 5 Rerun horses are easily identifiable as they are branded and the other 2 are pastured with them. The farm owners are the only people handling the horses so they are familiar with the 5 that they have.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Horses can be maintained in stalls adjoining smaller paddocks where they can still see the rest of the herd. They are gradually allowed access to the smaller area before eventually rejoining the herd in the larger pastures at the discretion of the vet.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Horses are typically maintained 24/7 on pasture with access to multiple home grown hay round bales. Typically horses are not fed grain and are constantly monitored for weight. Horses that are newly retired, struggle to maintain weight or cannot adjust to the herd situation are kept as sanctuary horses at the NY or VA farms where they still have access to grain and a stall at all times.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Our attending veterinarians assign each horse a body condition score upon entry to our program. Body condition is monitored on an ongoing basis to ensure the barn/facility manager or foster farm is alerted to potential health or management issues. Although some of the horses may come into our program with less than ideal body condition scores, these scores drastically improve while in the care of our foster farms. Our attending vets consistently rate the horses in the care of our foster farms with ideal scores of 4-6.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     ReRun works in partnership with the attending veterinarians at each of our foster farms to ensure a safe environment for our horses. All horses upon arrival are quarantined and have their temperature taken and monitored for the first week along with specific attention being paid to nasal drainage. Each foster farm utilizes fly spray, pesticides and other chemicals to repel insects and the spread of insect-born diseases. Stalls and pastures are cleaned regularly and manure is kept away from the barns to avoid the spread of parasites. Manure is spread in a designated area that is not used as pasture and euthanized horses are either buried on site in one of the pastures at the back of the property or removed and disposed of.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     All facilities are equipped with fire extinguishers, have emergency contact numbers posted in visible locations and prepare for emergencies accordingly. In the event of a hurricane, farms store water in tubs to ensure enough supply in the event of long-term power outages and also have a generator in the event of heavy snow fall and blizzards.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     As this is a sanctuary farm, Mr Schoo does not allow access to the premises at anytime other than by 24 hours prior notice and members of the public are not allowed access.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Fredrick County Humane Society 550 Highland Street #200 Frederick, MD 21701 Telephone: (301) 694-8300 Fax: (301) 694-8305 email: info@fchs.org

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Homes for Horses Coalition 4017 Bunch Walnuts Rd. Chesapeake, VA 23322 cindy@homesforhorses.org 757-932-0394 NYS Horse Council - southeast (602) 300-3711 Alison Clarke aclarke33@optonline.net TAA Janice Towles 821 Corporate Dr. Lexington, KY 40503 859-224-2756 info@thoroughbredaftercare.org NYSTBDF Tracy Egan New York State Thoroughbred Breeding & Development Fund Corporation One Broadway Center, Suite 601 • Schenectady, New York 12305 Phone: (518) 388-0174 • Fax: (518) 344-1235 • Email: nybreds@nybreds.co


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/08/2017

Veterinarian: Dr Elizabeth Reese

    Street: 18101 Cattail Road    City: Poole  State: MD    Zip: 20837

Phone: 301-775-202    Email: ereesedvm@verizon.net


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 12.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 45

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 75

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:We pay a set fee per horse that covers everything except vet, farrier and de-worming and we are billed per incident per horse. We pay $180 per horse per calendar month - the total expense for board for 2016 at Long View was $26,308

12 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 2 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

14 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 2 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

2 = Total of 2d-2f

12 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            0 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            12 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$5525     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$1579     Veterinarian.

$816     Farrier.

$120     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$263     Medications & Supplements.

$526     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$17479     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$26308     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

3950     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $7
Question 3 ($26,308 ) divided by Question 4 (3950).

Average length of stay for an equine: 282 days
Question 4 (3950) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (14).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? No

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? 2-3 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.



Location 2 of 2
Breezy Meadows

236A Waters Road East Greenbush NY 12061

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Lisa Molloy

2. Contact's Phone: 859-595-6660

3. Contact's Email: lisa.rerun@gmail.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Brian Hart

518-857-0200

BHart@martinelectric.com

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     11/20/15 - 11/20/17 We have the option to renew or purchase as a lease to own.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     All utilities are included in the rent Grass cutting Weed eating Regular maintenance and repairs Snow Plowing Costs associated with maintaining the fire and security system Use of the entire facility - 21 acres and 48 stalls, 3 apartments

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 2.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 21

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. The main barn has 38 stalls - 12 x 12, all rubber matted Aisle ways are rubber pavers, LED lighting, heated tack rooms, laundry room, temperature controlled feed room and heated retractable hoses in the walls that reach all stalls. State of the art fire system with thermal detectors and heat sensors Eurocizer and theraplate 100 x 200 fully enclosed indoor arena 14 paddocks Additional 10 quarantine stalls in another barn

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     We custom built additional paddocks prior to moving in to allow for horses rehabbing, larger paddocks for those letting down and pastures for horses turned out in groups. As every horse has a stall and does not live out 24/7, we do not require shelters although all fields have wind breakers in the form of trees and hedges

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 6

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     The entire facility was custom built for upper level showjumpers by the owner and the indoor arena has over $100,000 of specialized footing. Everything was built to be conducive to the well being of the horse and allowing superior facilities to train out of.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     The TAA have already inspected the new facility and the amenities including new paddocks etc were found to be exceptional. We are also one of the partner programs for NYTHA.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     The owner's sister has a farm across the street with a truck and trailer along with neighbors that are all very accessible. In addition we have a host of commercial haulers that we use that are all in the local area.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? No

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     We have several saddles available for the trainers to use along with various size bridles. All horses go in a loose ring french link snaffle and mouth pieces are washed off with the conclusion of each training session. Blankets are laundered frequently and depending on the level of wear, the decision is made to either discard and replace or try to repair. We typically buy more expensive blankets because they will last several years through multiple horses as opposed to cheaper ones that usually tear or leak within a few weeks.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Horses all have door cards along with a board in the office that shows stall placements.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Horses are all stalled and turned up upon rotation. The older horses that have been in groups go out all day and the others go out depending on the nature of their injury, stage of rehab or go on the horse walker or are hand walked. All new arrivals or horses coming off rehab are initially sedated when first turned out and the sedation is reduced each day and turn out duration increased as they adjust. Horses do not stay out if they are running the fence or upset etc.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     We feed 14% protein, 8% fat sweet feed plus free choice alfalfa or alfalfa mix. Horses are also given alfalfa mix in the paddocks when there is no grazing due to seasonal changes. Horses are fed twice a day with amounts of hard feed ranging from 12lbs to 16lbs. Night checks are at 10pm and the horses are again hayed and watered.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     We try to maintain all horses between 4 and 6 on the Henneke Body Score - most arrive as a 3 to 4 out of training or surgery. Horses are not started back in work until they are at least a 4 nor can they be adopted out unless they are carrying sufficient weight. Horses are evaluated by the vet when they arrive and if they fail to thrive after de-worming and ulcer treatment which they all get upon arrival, further diagnostics are undertaken to determine their failure to thrive.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Manure is put in a concrete pit and removed every two weeks from the property or as needed. Nothing is spread on the farm. Horses needing to be euthanized are done so at the rear of the property and when possible, coordinated with the renderer who will remove the horse following the euthanization usually within the hour. None are buried on the property. All new horses are de-wormed within the first 2 weeks of arrival and horses are rotationally wormed every 10 weeks or per the recommendations of the attending vet. Incoming horses are placed in quarantine stalls and their appetite, nasal discharge and temperature is monitored for one week. In the case of nasal discharge, they are scoped and cultured as needed. As we have two vets as board members and the executive director worked in ICU for one of the major vet clinics in the country, biosecurity measures are taken very seriously and written protocols are in place to include the use of coveralls, foot baths, latex gloves etc.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     The farm has a fire system with strobe lights, thermal heat detectors and smoke sensors and is wired to send alarms to the local fire department. This is routinely tested and we have already done one practice run with the fire department since moving in 11/15. The farm has a generator that can power the entire farm including the wells and is also routinely serviced - was checked and fired up before every major storm warning. Snow plows and bulldozers are at our disposable and located across the street and we have enough paddocks to place all the horses in the event of an emergency plus an additional 10 stalls in the quarantine barn which is located on another part of the property.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     We have a security system with electronic front gates and intercom. In addition, 2 members of staff live on site and an electrician who works for the farm owner also lives in the front of the property. We arrange it so that someone is always left at the farm. The state police have an officer that also lives next door and once a week he drives through and checks in on us and the premises.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Bob Guyer is the animal control officer and we have spoken frequently. His contact is Telephone: 518-951-0213 E-mail: straydawg@nycap.rr.com Mohawk Hudson is the local animal shelter; 3 Oakland Ave, Menands, NY 12204 Phone:(518) 434-8128

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Homes for Horses Coalition 4017 Bunch Walnuts Rd. Chesapeake, VA 23322 cindy@homesforhorses.org 757-932-0394 NYS Horse Council - southeast (602) 300-3711 Alison Clarke aclarke33@optonline.net TAA Janice Towles 821 Corporate Dr. Lexington, KY 40503 859-224-2756 info@thoroughbredaftercare.org NYSTBDF Tracy Egan New York State Thoroughbred Breeding & Development Fund Corporation One Broadway Center, Suite 601 • Schenectady, New York 12305 Phone: (518) 388-0174 • Fax: (518) 344-1235 • Email: nybreds@nybreds.co


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/01/2017

Veterinarian: Dr Jerry Bilinski

Clinic Name: Chatham Equine Hospital    Street: 4042 NY203    City: North Chatham  State: NY    Zip: 12132

Phone: 518-766-4600    Email: csahdvms@aol.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Amy LeBarron

     2. Instructor: Lisa Molloy


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 25.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 25

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 48

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:Feed and bedding are calculated under the same code in accounting Maintenance is contracted with the landlord and part of our agreement with him Dental comes under vet services.

26 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 68 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 1 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

95 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 60 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 12 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

72 = Total of 2d-2f

23 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            20 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            3 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$89655     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$25668     Veterinarian.

$13185     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$0     Medications & Supplements.

$8607     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$25160     Horse Care Staff.

$10275     Horse Training.

$6840     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$179390     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

6385     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $28
Question 3 ($179,390 ) divided by Question 4 (6385).

Average length of stay for an equine: 67 days
Question 4 (6385) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (95).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses?

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-All of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Amy LeBarron

         *Facility Participation:

         Breezy Meadows

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Amy showed on the A circuit under Glenn DiSanto before riding professionally at the track. She currently rides for several different trainers including Nick Zito and she also works nights foaling mares for Tom Gallo the president of NYTB and Stonebridge Farms. She works a few afternoons per week for Rerun riding several horses per session


     2. *Instructor: Lisa Molloy

         *Facility Participation:

         Breezy Meadows

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.British Horse Society

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1990

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Assistant Instructors Stages 1-3; Riding and Driving Safety

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.HND Thoroughbred Racehorse Management

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1990

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Thoroughbred Racehorse Management - was done as a government funded block release - 6 weeks at work, 2 weeks at college for 2 years under top trainer JG Fitzgerald.

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. 35 years of riding experience including 27 years as a paid employee/professional within the horse industry. Has worked for some of the top trainers in Europe and North America and was responsible for the care of such racing greats as Androma, 2 x winner of the Scottish Grand National and Lochsong - 2 x winner of Cartier Horse of the Year. Holds an HND in Thoroughbred Racehorse Management and related livestock along with BHS qualifications including assistant instructor.