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People & Animal Learning Services, Inc. (PALS)

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 03/30/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Marianne Van Winkle

Employees:   Full-Time:  5  Part-Time:  11  Volunteers:  200

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Volunteers: All program volunteers participate in a three-hour training program co-led by the Outreach Coordinator and Program Director. Training includes topics related to the facility and volunteer responsibilities. Volunteers are given a tour of the facility that highlights the location of all off-limit areas, safety rooms, first aid kits, client and volunteer files, tack, equipment, cleaning supplies, parking zones, pastures, waiting rooms, offices, classrooms, and arenas. Grooming and tacking demonstrations are provided and arena work includes appropriate therapeutic riding holds, terminology, mounting, dismounting, client interaction, and emergency procedures related to fire, inclement weather, medical conditions, and horse control. Volunteers are then designated as horse leaders or sidewalkers based on their past experience or comfort level with equines. Those interested in becoming horse leaders in sessions are required to participate in an additional examination facilitated by PATH Intl-certified riding instructors. All program volunteers complete the following paperwork initially: Volunteer Application and Health History, Liability Release, Photo Consent, Medical Consent for Treatment, and Volunteer Commitment form with an annual update required of the Volunteer Application and Health History form. PALS requires all staff and volunteers to pass a background check conducted by Verified Volunteers. Because PALS’s priority is the safety of the clients, staff, volunteers and guests, certain actions and convictions for certain crimes serve to automatically disqualify applicants for employment or volunteer service at PALS in any position that involves working with children. PALS reserves the right to conduct annual background checks on an as needed basis. A person will be ineligible for employment or volunteer service if the person: 1. refuses to consent to a criminal background check, 2. makes a false statement in connection with such criminal background check, 3. is registered, or required to be registered on any sex offender registry,4. has been convicted of a felony, 5. or has been convicted within the past 5 years of a misdemeanor involving: physical assault or battery, or cruelty to animals. Additionally, on an annual basis, each volunteer receives a copy of the PALS Volunteer Manual, a 34-page handbook containing all facility and program rules, policies and tips on being an effective volunteer with the program.

Staff: Upon hiring (which includes passing a background check as outlined in the volunteer section), all staff members complete a one-on-one introduction to PALS with the Executive Director designed to collect necessary paperwork, answer questions, and ensure understanding of all PALS policies and procedures. PALS Staff sign and complete the following paperwork upon employment: federal and state tax forms, job description and contract, direct deposit form, Personal Information and Health History Form, Conflict of Interest and Confidentiality Form, Insurance forms, Liability Form, and Consent for Medical Treatment form. PALS employees then may also receive: keys, e-mail address, phone extension number, and business cards as deemed necessary by the position. PALS employees also receive a copy of the Employee handbook and discuss policies including: vacation/time off, attendance, dress code, performance evaluation, complaint procedures, reimbursement, and event stipends. Each employee at PALS receives an annual review of performance completed both by the individual and his/her immediate supervisor, with instructors receiving additional evaluations of lesson techniques and procedures 4x annually by the PALS Assistant or Executive Director. All PATH, Intl. certified instructors on staff must to provide sessions to PALS clients are additionally required to attend the PALS volunteer training, train with the Program Director on proper assessment and progress note procedures, supply copies of their PATH, Intl. instructor card, as well as proof of CPR and First Aid certifications.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  12

Number of Board Members:  11  Number of Voting Board Members:  11

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Since its inception in 2000, PALS has been dedicated to providing comprehensive, individualized therapeutic equine programs designed by professionals to intentionally develop and restore functional skills, enhance well-being and improve quality of life. PALS has provided over 14,500 hours of therapeutic equine progams including therapeutic riding, unmounted activities, camps, equine educational programs, equine experiential programs, a veterans program, and camp opportunities designed to improve the lives of hundreds of children, adults, and seniors in the South Central Indiana community ages three and up.

As the only organization in Monroe County to have received a Premier Accreditation distinction from the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.), PALS has been instrumental in providing the highest quality EAA/T for individuals in need from 11 counties across the state.

Going from rented space to our own facility in 2013 ignited a period of growth in client base, volunteer base, staff, horses and programs. It is our goal as an organization to continue to evolve to meet the needs of individuals facing challenges. As the diversity of our client base grows, our staff is able to conduct a variety of programs that utilize the horse as an effecting and engaging therapeutic tool. In addition to therapeutic programs, PALS offers recreational riding lessons which are commonly given to siblings of our therapeutic riding clients, as well as boarding services to people in the local community.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. None

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     As a PATH Intl. Premier-Accredited facility, PALS abides by the standards set forth by PATH Intl. with regards to the care of and use of the horses owned by the organization. Horses at PALS work no more than three hours per day with no more than one hour of continuous work, with each horse's soundness checked daily by a PATH Intl. certified instructor prior to any client interaction or activity. PALS accepts horses only when the need arises in the program based on the number of clients and mounted hours needed to fulfill lesson requests, and selects horses based on their temperament, soundness, body condition, training background, and current abilities. No horses who demonstrate obvious lameness, health issues, or temperament concerns during an initial visit are accepted into the initial 3 month assessment stage. PALS also implements an ongoing schooling program for each horse to meet their individual needs. Designed by the Program Director, each horse is schooled within the guidelines provided by a volunteer who must pass an examination that includes elements related to riding, tacking, and grooming, all evaluated by a PATH Intl. certified riding instructors. Training session notes must also be completed by each rider in the schooling program, documenting the progress made during the session, additional considerations for the next schooling session, and any concerns that may arise.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     All horses in the PALS program have been donated by previous owners, or are loaned by a current owner for a standard period of time. Contracts for the donation or lease of each horse is completed when it is accepted into the PALS program.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Horses may be retired from the PALS program due to injury, illness, or behavior /temperament issues that impact the horse’s ability to effectively and comfortable perform their job. Horses retired from the PALS program are first offered back to the individual who initially donated the horse to the program. Should that individual not be able to or interested in having the horse, a suitable retirement home is found for the horse within the PALS network (PALS staff members, PALS board members, PALS volunteers). Any individual interested in a retired PALS horse is required to allow PALS staff to visit the location the horse will be moving to in or to assess suitability and safety of the horse’s new home.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Horse are selected for the PALS program based on the current herd and the need for various heights and skill levels of the individual horse. An initial visit to the current home of the horse and meeting with the owner provides the first insight into the horse’s suitability for the PALS program. Overall temperament and etiquette of the horse are evaluated by a PATH Intl. certified instructor during the initial visit, which typically also includes and a horse’s overall skill set, attitude, and health. Each owner is interviewed regarding the health of their horse including and past injuries, surgeries, vaccinations, or worming schedule administered. The owner is asked to lead, groom, tack, and ride the horse first to provide insight to the PALS team on the temperament and skill set the horse possesses. If a horse is deemed suitable following the owner's demonstration, the PALS instructor may opt to ride the horse themselves and use other staff members as mock side walkers to gauge the horse's reaction. Each horse accepted after the initial visit into the program participates in a 3 month trial period during which they are introduced to a variety of obstacles and games to judge the appropriateness of the horse for the work needed and clients served, those deemed unacceptable for the program are returned to their owners following the trial period, with those passing becoming a permanent member of the PALS herd. Each horse that arrives on the PALS property must have a current negative coggins and all required site vaccinations.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Daily care and monitoring is provided by the PALS Facility Manager who oversees and facilitates feeding and turn out on a daily basis. Additional checks are performed prior to lessons daily to ensure the health and soundness of every horse in the PALS program. Supplements (MSM, probiotics, hoof, mare magic and prescribed medication (previcox, adequan) are administered as needed by the facility Manager. Monthly evaluations of weight and well being are preformed to ensure the health and well being of our herd.

Veterinary Care: PALS horses receive 2 scheduled annual examinations with veterinarians who have served the program for over 10 years. Spring and Fall vaccinations (Including: west nile, tetanus, influenza, eastern and western encephalitis, rhinopneumonatis, rabies, and strangles )and teeth floating (as needed) are provided during these visits. Additional visits will be scheduled for lameness, sickness or emergency circumstances at the discretion of the Facility Manager and Program Director.

Worming Schedule: PALS horses receive routine fecal testing in conjunction with their annual vaccinations. Specific worming recommendations are made per horse, after fecal has been read by a veterinarian. Additional fecals and worming will be preformed on an as needed basis.

Veterinary Care: PALS horses receive 2 scheduled annual examinations with veterinarians who have served the program for over 10 years. Spring and Fall vaccinations (Including: west nile, tetanus, influenza, eastern and western encephalitis, rhinopneumonatis, rabies, and strangles )and teeth floating (as needed) are provided during these visits. Additional visits will be scheduled for lameness, sickness or emergency circumstances at the discretion of the Facility Manager and Program Director.

Worming Schedule: PALS horses receive routine fecal testing in conjunction with their annual vaccinations. Specific worming recommendations are made per horse, after fecal has been read by a veterinarian. Additional fecals and worming will be preformed on an as needed basis.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     PALS would only euthanize a horse if recommended by the organization's veterinarian for severe health-related circumstances.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     PALS does not breed horses, allow pregnant mares into the program, or stallions onto the property.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Less than $200

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  All equines have one set fee or donation amount.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: In addition to the program horses located on PALS property, PALS also allows select staff members, community members, and clients to board privately owned horses on the property. These horses are not owned by, or are the responsibility of the PALS organization, outside of the basic services provided to the horses in the boarding contract. They are not horses that are ever utilized in center programs or activities.



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
PALS Barn

7644 W Elwren Road Bloomington IN 47403

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Marianne Van Winkle

2. Contact's Phone: 812-336-2798

3. Contact's Email: info@palstherapy.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 6.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 15

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. PALS utilizes 5 separate pastures surrounded by wood fences. Pastures all for separation between PALS program horses and boarders at the facility. PALS further separates boarder horses by gender, with geldings in one pasture ad mares in another. Since no run-in sheds are currently available in the pasture horses are brought into the main barn during any inclement weather or periods of extreme temperature. Trees along the edge of the pasture do provide some shade as needed during the summer months.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     PALS rotates herds between pastures throughout the year based on the size of the group and current condition of each pasture. PALS annually tests the soil and works with the local Department of Agriculture office to determine the appropriate adjustments to scheduling related to fertilizing and seeding each pasture. Pastures are fertilized and seeded in the spring as needed.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 9

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     PALS utilizes an indoor riding area found inside the large barn with sand footing. The arena is treated with Mag flakes to control dust created by riding activities and ensure the indoor environment remains safe for both horses and their riders. The arena is dragged a minimum of 3x per week to maintain the surface integrity and sand is added on an as needed basis.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Yes, the PALS facility meets all standards set forth by PATH International regarding the facility space.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     PALS has access to trailers owned by staff-one of which is stored on the organization's property--for use in the case of an emergency.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     When a horse is accepted into the PALS program the Program Director assesses the fit of all tack to the individual horse. The results are recorded and appropriate tack is then assigned to the horse. Each horse has their own individual halter, bridle, girth, and grooming supplies. On an annual basis, tack fit is assessed on all current horses to adjust for any changes and ensure the best possible fit. Only the PALS Facility Manager fits and uses blankets on the PALS horses.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Each horse's halter is individually tagged with the individual horse's name. Each pasture gate displays a list of horses that are turned out in the space, and each stall displays a name tag and associated information sheet for each individual horse including a picture of the horse.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     PALS has access to various areas for individual dry lot turnout as needed. Horses that are allowed no turn out are hand walked by staff per the instructions of a veterinarian as needed.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     The PALS Facility Manager handles the management and development of all feed plans for PALS horses in conjunction with the organization's veterinarian. The use of all supplements is based on the recommendation of the veterinarian and is managed and distributed by the Facility Manager. PALS primarily provides a pellet grain product (12% protein) for the PALS horses but supplements various products when an individual horse's diet requires some adjusting. It's not uncommon for PALS to support an older horse with alfalfa cubes, rice bran, or beet pulp as necessary.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Working with our veterinarian, PALS strives to maintain each horse's condition at a score of 5-7. PALS works actively with our veterinarian and Purina representative to monitor each horse's condition and adapt feed plans accordingly.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Per the suggestion of the organization's veterinarian, PALS requires all horses that arrive on the property maintain a negative coggins as well as provide proof of the following vaccinations in the last year: west nile, tetanus, influenza, eastern and western encephalitis, rhinopneumonatis, rabies, and strangles. PALS also requires all horses on property participate in the following deworming program designed by the organization's veterinarian: January: Oxibendazole March: *Moxidectin May: Pyrantel Pamoate July: Praziquantel + Ivermectin September: Oxibendazole November: Ivermectin Horses that die on the PALS property are removed by a local disposal company. No horses are buried on the property. Manure at the facility is stored in a separate covered building approved by the US Department of Agriculture specifically for that use. Some manure is spread as fertilizer on pasture space, the remainder is given away to community members.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     PALS has developed a comprehensive emergency plan that address human and horse health emergencies, as well as natural emergencies including fire and tornadoes. Maps highlight designated safe zones are provided to all clients and volunteers and are clearly posted around the facility.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The PALS Facility Manager lives on property and maintains the security of the facility during non-program hours.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Monroe County Humane Association 812.333.MCHA (6242) mcha@monroehumane.org 3410 S Walnut St., Bloomington, IN 47401 PO Box 1334, Bloomington, IN 47402

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Local: Animal Care and Control 3410 S Walnut St Bloomington IN 47401 812-349-3492 animal@bloomington.in.gov State: Indiana Horse Council 1202 East 38th Street Communications Building Indianapolis In 46205-2869 Email: jennwilsonreagan@gmail.com Phone: 317-599-0720 National: PATH Intl. PO Box 33150 Denver, CO 80233 Phone: (800) 369-7433 or (303) 452-1212 Fax: (303) 252-4610 Email: kalm@pathintl.org (Executive Director)


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/28/2017

Veterinarian: Ken & Susan Kimmick

Clinic Name: Farmstead Veterinary Service    Street: 7667 S Old State Road 37    City: Bloomington  State: IN    Zip: 47403

Phone: 812-824-19    Email: info@farmsteadvetservice.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Annie Cornett

     2. Instructor: Christa Arthur

     3. Instructor: Cindy Lindsenbardt

     4. Instructor: Fern Goodman

     5. Instructor: Holly Foster

     6. Instructor: Lizzie Cochrane


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 11.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 21

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 26

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

10 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 4 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

14 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 2 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

2 = Total of 2d-2f

12 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            11 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            1 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$17407     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$1655     Bedding.

$5056     Veterinarian.

$2498     Farrier.

$1102     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$1467     Medications & Supplements.

$985     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$34135     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$64305     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

3895     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $17
Question 3 ($64,305 ) divided by Question 4 (3895).

Average length of stay for an equine: 278 days
Question 4 (3895) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (14).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? Most of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? Most of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses?

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-All of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? Some of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Weekly

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 160

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 24

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 45

4. What is the average wait list time? 5 Weeks(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 1.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 2

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 4

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 80%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Annie Cornett

         *Facility Participation:

         PALS Barn

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Level Instructor: A Registered Instructor is able to conduct an effec-tive, safe and basic lesson to include teaching a riding skill to individuals with disabilities."

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS)


     2. *Instructor: Christa Arthur

         *Facility Participation:

         PALS Barn

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association for Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Level Instructor: A Registered Instructor is able to conduct an effective, safe and basic lesson to include teaching a riding skill to individuals with disabilities.


     3. *Instructor: Cindy Lindsenbardt

         *Facility Participation:

         PALS Barn

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Level Instructor: A Registered Instructor is able to conduct an effective, safe and basic lesson to include teaching a riding skill to individuals with disabilities."


     4. *Instructor: Fern Goodman

         *Facility Participation:

         PALS Barn

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1999

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Advanced Level instructor: Advanced Level Certified Instructor is knowledgeable in horsemanship and understands disabilities and their relationship to therapeutic riding. This instructor is able to conduct safe, challenging and therapeutically effective lessons to individuals with disabilities.


     5. *Instructor: Holly Foster

         *Facility Participation:

         PALS Barn

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association for Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Level Instructor: A Registered Instructor is able to conduct an effective, safe and basic lesson to include teaching a riding skill to individuals with disabilities.


     6. *Instructor: Lizzie Cochrane

         *Facility Participation:

         PALS Barn

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association for Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Level Instructor: A Registered Instructor is able to conduct an effective, safe and basic lesson to include teaching a riding skill to individuals with disabilities.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.American Heart Association

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.First Aid / CPR - certified to provide CPR/first aid to infants, children and adults