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Shining Hope Farms

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/29/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Milinda Kirkpatrick

Employees:   Full-Time:  2  Part-Time:  27  Volunteers:  500

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Regular, direct service volunteers go through a volunteer training before beginning volunteer work with the farm. This training is typically done in a group and involves an introduction to Hippotherapy and Equine Assisted Activities as well as policies, procedures, and hands on work with the equine including grooming, horse-leading, and side-walking. Volunteers are equipped with a volunteer handbook and receive further training on site as they come back to participate. Volunteers that come for workdays are not involved in the direct service of our participants or equines, and as a result do not receive a formalized training.

Staff members typically have college degrees and are required to have specialized training through certification workshops for the services that SHF provides. The staff is also required to attend a volunteer training session to become familiar with the facility and the horses. Each staff person is presented with a job description describing their responsibilities and duties as well as an orientation document. Annual reviews are performed by the Executive Director and Program Director.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  6

Number of Board Members:  10  Number of Voting Board Members:  9

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member. The executive director (who is a nonvoting board member) is the mother of one of the instructors/the equine specialist (currently a volunteer), the mother in-law of the Mecklenburg location's barn manager, and the mother of the fill-in office manager.

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 75

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Therapeutic Riding Program - A PATH Intl. certified instructor conducts these group lessons where individuals are taught horseback riding skills as well as participate in games and activities while horseback riding. The lessons are recreational in nature and the riders are assisted by a horse leader and side walkers which provide a safe and enjoyable social environment.

Hippotherapy Program - Shining Hope Farms is recognized by the Federal Government as a healthcare provider able to conduct Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech-language Pathology, using the horse as a treatment tool, to children and adults with disabilities.

Special Olympics - Shining Hope Farms partners with Special Olympics of Catawba, Gaston, Lincoln, and Mecklenburg Counties to provide the program. The program involves a lesson program, regional invitational show, and culminates in the optional state level competition.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 3

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. Both farms have small animals used for interaction as part of treatment strategies (including a bunny and cat at each location) or lesson plans in our therapeutic programs.

Community Service Programs - Shining Hope Farms hosts many workdays both with local organizations and Charlotte based corporations such as Hands-On-Charlotte, a local chapter of the national Hands-On Network. Additionally, Shining Hope Farms hosts numerous Eagle Scout projects, helping Boy Scouts to obtain their Eagle Scout award, and Girl Scout projects to help Girl Scouts to achieve their Girl Scout Gold Award. Volunteers also participate in the horse-related programs throughout the year.

We also treat our patients in our Hippotherapy Program in our clinic during a portion of their weekly session, as well as one week a month during our "clinic week."

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  Yes



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     At Shining Hope Farms, since we are a PATH, Intl. Premier Accredited Center, we follow the policies and procedures set forth by our governing organization in order to maintain an operating center including their recommendations for equine control and maintenance. Our Equine Specialist on staff, Jessi Culbertson, is a Graduate HA Pony Clubber in the United States Pony Club and adheres to the Pony Club standards for ongoing training, schooling, developing an exercise plan for each horse, as well as overseeing the selection process of the horses that we accept as suitable for our programs. We use the appropriate County Zoning and Agricultural Extension Office's standards for the number of equines that we are able to own, (No more than 2 horses per 1 acre in both Mecklenburg and Gaston Counties).

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Shining Hope Farms has obtained equines in the following ways: donation, free-lease, purchase, rescue, and seizure.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     When placing a horse from our program into another home, the staff goes through the following procedures to ensure that the animal will be well cared for after it leaves our care: an interview is performed with the prospective new owner, a site visit is made to assure that there is proper fencing, housing, and ample pasture and water supply. We include in our contractual agreement that SHF will have first right of refusal to have the animal returned if the new owner is unable to keep the horse. The staff also does a follow-up visit a couple times a year to make sure that the horse is still in good condition and enjoying its new home. We did acquire two horses back in our possession when the horses that we placed lost a significant amount of weight and it was determined that they were not being cared for properly. We were able to locate good, safe homes for the animals.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Our initial on site assessment includes: a physical examination, longeing, a test ride, and a desensitizing test of the horse to see how it responds to new things being introduced using primarily toys and games that are utilized in our Hippotherapy and therapeutic riding programs, (i.e. hula hoops, balls, toys that make noises, flying flags, simulating seizures by the rider, etc). Once we determine that we are interested in the horse, we require the medical records including a negative Coggins report and a pre-purchase exam if we are intending to purchase the horse. We also require a trial period to make sure that the horse will adjust well to our environment and and jobs we are expecting the animal to perform.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Nutrition - Samples of our soil from our pastures has been analyzed through our agricultural extension office to determine what our soil needs in order to produce a good crop of grass high in nutritional value for our horses. Our horses are fed feed twice daily and are offered free choice hay whenever stalled. Additional supplements are given to each individual horse as needed for geriatric or at-risk equines.

Exercise/Conditioning - There is a Horse Usage Record book kept at the farms to log how much a horse is being used for the programs offered at SHF. The horses are groomed with hooves picked out and lunged or ridden daily before the therapeutic or hippotherapy program begins. We are careful to change up their riding routine and offer a variety of riding aspects for the horses so as to prevent them from getting burned out from a particular job they are to perform. Our horses enjoy trail rides, schooling in an arena, off site programs, lunging, conditioning work on hills for strength training.

Veterinary Care - A routine annual well visit is maintained for each equine owned by SHF as well as those owned by individuals leased for the programs' use. The well visit includes a physical examination, appropriate vaccinations (West Nile Virus Booster, Flu-Rhino Booster, Rabies,V/E/W/T), teeth floated, Coggins, and fecal examination testing. For equines 15 years of age and older we also have the veterinarian check their blood work with a CBC (LA) and Panel-LA. A rotation of de-worming products administered spring and fall is implemented based on the findings of the fecal samples.

Stable/Pasture Management - Horses that do not interact well together are separated by paddocks to ensure that the entire herd is kept safe from biting or kicking injuries. SHF has an "Introduction" paddock used for new equines until they are able to transition into the existing herd of animals. We also have spaces for horses that need to be on stall rest or small areas for rehabilitation purposes or for at-risk horses.

The overall healthcare of the horses of SHF is overseen by our Equine Specialist, who is a graduate HA in the United States Pony Club.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Our euthanasia policy states that SHF will not allow a horse to suffer and will euthanize an equine only if the Veterinarian deems it the only humane decision. Most of the equines in our programs are covered by medical insurance plans that ensures our nonprofit will have the financial capability to provide adequate medical care to all our animals. Our organization will not euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     N/A

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: NA

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 3

.

Location 1 of 3
Shining Hope Farms Mecklenburg Location

3701 Kidd Lane Charlotte NC 28216

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Milinda Kirkpatrick

2. Contact's Phone: 704-827-3788

3. Contact's Email: shininghopefarms@gmail.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: PO BOX 6929
Statesville, NC 28687-6929

Owner: Grange Properties, LLC
(704) 435-6937

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Shining Hope Farms went into an initial three year lease with Grange Properties, LLC. The start date of the lease was November 22, 2010 and it ended on November 30, 2013. Shining Hope Farms entered into a new five-year lease agreement on December 1, 2013 which will expire December 1, 2018. Shining Hope Farms has the option to enter into new lease agreements to utilize the facility free-of-charge indefinitely as long as the nonprofit is financially secure and operates in compliance with IRS nonprofit governance standards. The property was purchased to be used specifically for a therapeutic riding facility, and will remain for that purpose.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     The owner of the property is our benefactor, (who wishes to remain anonymous), that contributes $30,000 annually to financially support Shining Hope Farms. We lease the 33 acre farm free-of-charge and can renew the lease agreement every 5 years. Additionally, the benefactor provides some funds for leasehold improvements, equipment to maintain the facilities, as well as has sponsored some of our fundraising events.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 6.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 44

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. There are seven fenced pastures or paddock areas for the equines that reside on the property. Electro-Braid fencing is used to separate the interior of the pastures and some vinyl fencing as well. The perimeter of all the pastures has livestock fencing to keep coyotes, possums, skunks, racoons out of pastures. The horses have a run in shed in the pasture. We have a "pony" barn with four stalls and there is a Morton barn structure with four large sized stalls for the horses, a wash bay, a tack room, and feed room.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     The horses/ponies are kept inside their stalls during the day in the summer months and turned out in the pastures in the evening. The horses are rotated to vacant pastures so that the field where they were kept can promote healthy forage again.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 16

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     The Mecklenburg location has three riding areas: a large 100' x 200' outdoor riding arena with granite screenings and strained creek sand on top for footing, an enclosed indoor riding arena with sand footing, and a grass jump field. All riding surfaces are maintained on a daily basis by using a harrow.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     We are compliant with the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International standards. The standards encompass facility structure and maintenance, rider safety, proper adaptive and equine equipment, horse selection and maintenance, and basic safety guidelines for riders, volunteers, and staff.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Two Ford F-250 farm trucks and two, two-horse trailer are available for equine emergencies.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Equine Specialist, Jessi Culbertson, has had extensive tack fitting training by European professionals providing workshops here in the states. Each horse has its own bridle rack with the name of the horse labeling it. Each bridle and bit is selected to fit appropriately and to suit each individual horses' needs/requirements based on the horses' temperament, training level, and personality. Each horse is properly assessed with a good fitting saddle, pad and riser pad, if needed. Girths are labeled and kept separate. Each horse has a sheet and blanket to keep them clean in the winter months. Every item is labeled with the horse's name on it.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     A volunteer/staff training orientation is given to volunteers and new staff members where we recognize each horse on the property and give a description of each one's temperament and personality. Each horse has a stall with their name engraved on a name plate which marks the appropriate stall. Every stall has a metal bridle/halter bracket installed on the door where each horse's appropriately fitted leather halter and attached lead rope are kept.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     During the days when we are providing services Mondays thru Saturdays, the horses are brought into their stalls to remain for the day so that the staff does not have to keep going back and forth to the pastures to retrieve the horses for the services that we provide. At the end of the day, the horses are returned to their pastures where they stay overnight unless they are kept in due to severe weather conditions. We use natural horsemanship methods and give the horses turn out as much as possible. The only time an equine is stalled both day and night is when it is on stall rest as advised by the veterinarian.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Currently, we use Nutrena feed for our equines. Specifically, we use Special Care feed for the majority of our herds and Pro Force Fiber feed for equines over 15 years of age. For horses that are harder to keep weight on we use Pro Force Fuel. We also use beat pulp for several of our horses to help with digestion. Our livestock are fed twice daily, water tubs was washed out weekly and refilled daily, free choice hay (orchard mix) is always available both in the pastures and in the stalls. White salt bricks are in the stalls and large mineral salt blocks are located in each pasture. Supplements that we use when needed for certain horses are purchased from Tractor Supply and include: Dumor Hoof supplement, Dumor Senior Combo, Smart Pak Smart Tendon, Red Cell, Apple a Day Electrolytes (during show season), Glucosamine, and Corn Oil.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     In order to determine a horse's overall body condition score six key areas need to be examined: Back, Ribs, Withers, Neck, Shoulder, Tail head. Typically each key area will be within 1 point of the other key areas. At Shining Hope Farms we aim to have our horses score between 5-7 using the Henneke System of Body Condition Scoring. We aim to have our ponies score between 6-8.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     General Biosecurity Plan for Shining Hope Farms: Visitor Access to Horses - Restrict and/or monitor visitors to prevent contact with horses. Visitors can inadvertently spread disease if specific sanitation procedures are not followed. One visitor can easily spread infectious agents to many animals. It is recommended to keep visitors out of the stable and stalls if they don't need to be there. - Maintain a record of visitors to the barn to improve the ability to respond in case there is an outbreak and spread of disease. New Horse Arrivals - Obtain and record recent history of new horse arrivals and determine previous location(s) during the past thirty days and current medical status of the horse. New horses can bring new diseases to the barn. A period of quarantine (2 weeks) before placing close to the other horses is ideal, but if not practical, use the highest biosecurity level described below that we can accomplish. Horse Equipment and Tack - Don't share any horse equipment with neighbors or other horse people. - Thoroughly clean the equipment if it has been used by other horses/people. Use detergent and disinfectant before use on any SHF horse. This includes tack, bits, rugs, feed and water bins. Request vets, farriers and others providing horse services to use clean/sanitized equipment on SHF horses. Personal Biosecurity - Some diseases can be easily carried on people's clothing, hats, hands, shoes, and hair. - Change into clean clothes and footwear; wash hands with soap and water. Sometimes it may be necessary to have a shower, wash your hair and put on clean clothes (see levels of biosecurity) Trailers and Trucks - Clean and decontaminate with disinfectant according to protocol the interior of the trailer or vans in between usage. Cleaning and Disinfectants - Proper cleaning requires removal of all soil, organic material, snot/mucus with a detergent so the disinfectant can be effective. - Disinfection can then be achieved with the use of household products such as common detergents and soaps (e.g. washing powder), washing soda, household chlorine bleach. Illness Surveillance and Reporting - Report horses that appear ill or have a high temperature to the appropriate person in the barn. Contact the veterinarian as soon as possible. The vet can determine if the horse is in need of quarantine or a visit to the hospital and whether the illness should be reported to the Official Veterinarian or other authorities. Biosecurity During The Presence of Disease or High Risk Conditions Biosecurity Levels of Alerts and Actions are required to manage containment of disease spread. - Biosecurity begins at the front entry gate. Color-coded signs that show the different biosecurity alerts shall be posted to let visitors know that the area is bio-secure. - There will be personnel at the entry gate to distribute a copy of biosecurity guidelines to all personnel who enter the gate. All visitors will be informed of biosecurity measures before entering of the area that is in quarantine and not to enter that area. - A record of all vehicle traffic shall be maintained to track trip origination and destination in case of the need to investigate disease spread. - The appropriate personnel will post approved signs with instructions for controls during an emergency/outbreak depending on the level of bio-security as shown at the entrance to the facilities. Signs will be provided by SHF management. - The signs will be placed by the stalls or upon entry to the stable

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     An emergency evacuation plan was drawn-up by our local volunteer fire departments and installed fire extinguishers are inspected monthly. Shining Hope Farms will participate in the water harvesting program in our state where large cisterns will be installed in-ground to catch rain water from the roofs through the guttering system. The water can then be recycled and used for various purposes, but most importantly as a water supply on the premise in case of a fire. The livestock is turned out in their pastures in case of hurricane or tornado warnings. The horses are kept in stalls when there is severe weather such as hail or freezing rain or below normal temperatures.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     There is perimeter fencing around the property with gated entrances as well as on-premises caretakers. Digital security cameras were also recently installed to monitor the perimeter and entrances of the facility.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Charlotte-Mecklenburg Animal Care & Control 311 8315 Byrum Drive Charlotte, NC 28217

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Horse Protection Society of North Carolina Inc. 2135 Miller Road, China Grove NC 28023 hps@horseprotection.org 704-855-2978


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/25/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Kristi Pierce-Shupe

Clinic Name: Rocky River Large Animal Veterinary Clinic    Street: 1920 South Ridge Avenue    City: Kannapolis  State: NC    Zip: 28083

Phone: 704-933-1792    Email: info@rockyrivervets.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Debbie Cloy

     2. Instructor: Elisabeth Larson

     3. Instructor: Jessi Culbertson

     4. Instructor: Kelly Coney-Pacious

     5. Instructor: Leslie Lytton

     6. Instructor: Verena Stock


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 10.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 10

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 15

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

10 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 0 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

10 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

0 = Total of 2d-2f

10 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            10 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$9413     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$450     Bedding.

$4148     Veterinarian.

$3500     Farrier.

$1531     Dentist.

$375     Manure Removal.

$935     Medications & Supplements.

$4113     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$7605     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$1816     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$33886     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

3650     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $9
Question 3 ($33,886 ) divided by Question 4 (3650).

Average length of stay for an equine: 365 days
Question 4 (3650) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (10).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 72

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 47

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 45

4. What is the average wait list time? 1 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 3.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 4

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 6

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 100%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed. Grooming buckets, brushes, and assorted grooming tools are cleaned by volunteers regularly. Tack including saddles, bridles and bits, and halters are cleaned after every use.



Location 2 of 3
Shining Hope Farms Gaston Location

328 Whippoorwill Lane Mount Holly NC 28120

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Milinda Kirkpatrick

2. Contact's Phone: 704-827-3788

3. Contact's Email: shininghopefarms@gmail.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 6.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 11

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. There are six fenced paddocks, one large stable with a covered riding arena, one hay storage barn, a large utility garage where farming tools and equipment are kept, and two large, outdoor, fenced riding arenas. Attached to the stable is an office, tack-room, as well as an on-site multi-roomed clinic.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Currently there are six paddocks. One paddock is used as a welcome paddock, one pony is turned out in a separate paddock to ensure its safety, two paddocks are used at any given time while the remaining two are vacant as part of the rotation schedule.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 16

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     The footing for the two larger outdoor arenas are granite screenings on top of clay and there is strained creek sand on top of the granite screenings. Each arena is fully fenced with sliding rail or swing gates. One arena is equipped with an adequate sprinkler system to control dust. Each arena is equipped with a wheelchair accessible loading ramp as well as a loading block with steps to accommodate all riders. Both arenas are on level ground. One arena is equipped with a French drain to ensure proper drainage. During inclement weather, the recently expanded covered arena attached to the barn is utilized. The footing in the covered arena is granite screenings. It has a loading ramp with steps. The factors that were taken into consideration to determine the suitability of the area for the activities were the following: -Separate riding arenas were necessary for riders on a leadline and those that ride independently -The arena where the hippotherapy was to be conducted needed to be more isolated and away from the driveway and parking lot. -The size of the arenas was determined by the number of clients that will be served at one time. The dressage arena is 75' x 200'. The arena where HPOT is performed is 100' x 200'. The covered arena measures 55' x 100'.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     We are compliant with the Premier Accredited Center Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International standards (and passed all 100%). The standards encompass facility structure and maintenance, rider safety, proper adaptive and equine equipment, horse selection and maintenance, and basic safety guidelines for riders, volunteers, and staff.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Two Ford F-250 farm trucks and two, two-horse trailers are available for equine emergencies.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Equine Specialist, Jessi Culbertson, has had extensive tack fitting training by European professionals providing workshops here in the states. Each horse has its own bridle rack with the name of the horse labeling it. Each bridle and bit is selected to fit appropriately and to suit each individual horses' needs/requirements based on the horses' temperament, training level, and personality. Each horse is properly assessed with a good fitting saddle, pad and riser pad, if needed. Girths are labeled and kept separate. Each horse has a sheet and blanket to keep them clean in the winter months. Every item is labeled with the horse's name on it.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     A volunteer/staff training orientation is given to volunteers and new staff members where we recognize each horse on the property and give a description of each one's temperament and personality. Each horse has a stall with their name engraved on a name plate which marks the appropriate stall. Every stall has a metal bridle/halter bracket installed on the door where each horse's appropriately fitted leather halter and attached lead rope are kept.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     During the days when we are providing services Mondays thru Saturdays, the horses are brought into their stalls to remain for the day so that the staff does not have to keep going back and forth to the pastures to retrieve the horses for the services that we provide. At the end of the day, the horses are returned to their pastures where they stay overnight unless they are kept in due to severe weather conditions. We use natural horsemanship methods and give the horses turn out as much as possible. The only time an equine is stalled both day and night is when it is on stall rest as advised by the veterinarian.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Currently, we use Nutrena feed for our equines. Specifically, we use Special Care feed for the majority of our herds and Pro Force Fiber feed for equines over 15 years of age. We also use beat pulp for several of our horses to help with digestion. Our livestock are fed twice daily, water tubs was washed out weekly and refilled daily, free choice hay (fescue or orchard mix) is always available both in the pastures and in the stalls. White salt bricks are in the stalls and large mineral salt blocks are located in each pasture. Supplements that we use when needed for certain horses are purchased from Tractor Supply and include: Dumor Hoof supplement, Dumor Senior Combo, Smart Pak Smart Tendon, Red Cell, Apple a Day Electrolytes (during show season), Glucosamine, and Corn Oil.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     In order to determine a horse's overall body condition score six key areas need to be examined: Back, Ribs, Withers, Neck, Shoulder, Tail head. Typically each key area will be within 1 point of the other key areas. At Shining Hope Farms we aim to have our horses score between 5-7 using the Henneke System of Body Condition Scoring. We aim to have our ponies score between 6-8.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     General Biosecurity Plan for Shining Hope Farms: Visitor Access to Horses - Restrict and/or monitor visitors to prevent contact with horses. Visitors can inadvertently spread disease if specific sanitation procedures are not followed. One visitor can easily spread infectious agents to many animals. It is recommended to keep visitors out of the stable and stalls if they don’t need to be there. - Maintain a record of visitors to the barn to improve the ability to respond in case there is an outbreak and spread of disease. New Horse Arrivals - Obtain and record recent history of new horse arrivals and determine previous location(s) during the past thirty days and current medical status of the horse. New horses can bring new diseases to the barn. A period of quarantine (2 weeks) before placing close to the other horses is ideal, but if not practical, use the highest biosecurity level described below that we can accomplish. Horse Equipment and Tack - Don't share any horse equipment with neighbors or other horse people. - Thoroughly clean the equipment if it has been used by other horses/people. Use detergent and disinfectant before use on any SHF horse. This includes tack, bits, rugs, feed and water bins. Request vets, farriers and others providing horse services to use clean/sanitized equipment on SHF horses. Personal Biosecurity - Some diseases can be easily carried on people's clothing, hats, hands, shoes, and hair. - Change into clean clothes and footwear; wash hands with soap and water. Sometimes it may be necessary to have a shower, wash your hair and put on clean clothes (see levels of biosecurity) Trailers and Trucks - Clean and decontaminate with disinfectant according to protocol the interior of the trailer or vans in between usage. Cleaning and Disinfectants - Proper cleaning requires removal of all soil, organic material, snot/mucus with a detergent so the disinfectant can be effective. - Disinfection can then be achieved with the use of household products such as common detergents and soaps (e.g. washing powder), washing soda, household chlorine bleach, hypochlorites, swimming pool disinfectant and citric acid. Check concentration and exposure times on the label. Illness Surveillance and Reporting - Report horses that appear ill or have a high temperature to the appropriate person in the barn. Contact the veterinarian as soon as possible. The vet can determine if the horse is in need of quarantine or a visit to the hospital and whether the illness should be reported to the Official Veterinarian or other authorities. Biosecurity During The Presence of Disease or High Risk Conditions Biosecurity Levels of Alerts and Actions are required to manage containment of disease spread. - Biosecurity begins at the front entry gate. Color-coded signs that show the different biosecurity alerts shall be posted to let visitors know that the area is bio-secure. - Personnel will distribute a copy of biosecurity guidelines to all personnel who enter the gate. All visitors will be informed of biosecurity measures before entering of the area that is in quarantine and not to enter that area. - A record of all vehicle traffic shall be maintained to track trip origination and destination in case of the need to investigate disease spread. - Appropriate personnel will post approved signs with instructions for controls during an emergency/outbreak depending on the level of bio-security as shown at the entrance to the facilities. Signs will be provided by SHF management. - The signs will be placed by the stalls or upon entry to the stable

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     An emergency evacuation plan was drawn-up by our local volunteer fire departments and installed fire extinguishers are inspected annually. Shining Hope Farms will participate in the water harvesting program in our state where large cisterns will be installed in-ground to catch rain water from the roofs through the guttering system. The water can then be recycled and used for various purposes, but most importantly as a water supply on the premise in case of a fire. The livestock is turned out in their pastures in case of hurricane or tornado warnings. The horses are kept in stalls when there is severe weather such as hail or freezing rain or below normal temperatures.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     There is perimeter fencing around the property with gated entrances as well as on-premises caretakers

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Gaston County Animal Control 220 Leisure Lane Dallas, NC 28034 Phone: 704-922-8677 press option #4

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Horse Protection Society of North Carolina Inc. 2135 Miller Road, China Grove NC 28023 hps@horseprotection.org 704-855-2978


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/25/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Kristi Pierce-Shupe

Clinic Name: Rocky River Large Animal Veterinary Clinic    Street: 1920 South Ridge Avenue    City: Kannapolis  State: NC    Zip: 28083

Phone: 704-933-1792    Email: info@rockyrivervets.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Debbie Cloy

     2. Instructor: Elisabeth Larson

     3. Instructor: Leslie Lytton

     4. Instructor: Madison Hood

     5. Instructor: Milinda Kirkpatrick

     6. Instructor: Verena Stock


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 8.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 8

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 10

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:We have less volunteer help for horse care at this farm than at our Mecklenburg location.

2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 0 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

8 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

0 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            8 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$9413     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$450     Bedding.

$4118     Veterinarian.

$3500     Farrier.

$1531     Dentist.

$375     Manure Removal.

$935     Medications & Supplements.

$4113     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$11087     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$35522     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

2920     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $12
Question 3 ($35,522 ) divided by Question 4 (2920).

Average length of stay for an equine: 365 days
Question 4 (2920) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (8).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 63

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 39

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 45

4. What is the average wait list time? 1 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 3.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 4

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 6

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 100%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed. Grooming buckets, brushes, and assorted grooming tools are cleaned by volunteers regularly. Tack including saddles, bridles and bits, and halters are cleaned after every use.



Location 3 of 3
Shining Hope Farms Conover Location

6347 St. Peters Church Road Conover NC 28613

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Milinda Kirkpatrick

2. Contact's Phone: 7048273788

3. Contact's Email: shininghopefarms@gmail.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Five Gaits, LLC
P.O. Box 6929
Statesville, NC 28687-6929

(704) 435-6937

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Start date of lease agreement 01/01/2017, end date - 01/01/2020. This is a renewable lease for as long as SHF desires to be a tenant of this property and maintains the appropriate nonprofit status.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     Monthly contributions are made by the owner to cover maintenance and repairs of the facility.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 1.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 20

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. There are 5 large fescue grass pastures enclosed with vinyl fencing. Each pasture has a run-in shed to protect the horses from inclement weather. This facility has a 26 horse stall Morton barn with rubber stall mats, automatic watering systems, a wash bay, grooming stall, a 100' x 200' enclosed riding arena, a clinic, 2 restrooms, a feed room, a tack room, 2 offices, and a laundry room. There is also a round pen and an outdoor riding arena that measures 100' x 200'

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     We do rotate the equines from a full pasture of grass during the night to more of a dry lot paddock during the day hours to prevent obesity, founder and or colic from consuming too much green grass.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 16

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     The footing for the large outdoor arena is strained creek sand on top of a graded clay surface. Each arena is fully fenced with sliding rail or swing gates. The indoor arena is equipped with adequate sprinkler system to control dust. The outdoor arena is equipped with a wheelchair accessible loading ramp as well as a loading block with steps to accommodate all riders. Both arenas are on level ground. One arena is equipped with a French drain to ensure proper drainage. The factors that were taken into consideration to determine the suitability of the area for the activities were the following: -Separate riding arenas were necessary for riders on a leadline and those that ride independently -The arena where the hippotherapy was to be conducted needed to be more isolated and away from the driveway and parking lot. -The size of the arenas was determined by the number of clients that will be served at one time. Both the outdoor and indoor arenas measure 100' x 200'.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     We are compliant with the Premier Accredited Center Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International standards (and passed all 100%). The standards encompass facility structure and maintenance, rider safety, proper adaptive and equine equipment, horse selection and maintenance, and basic safety guidelines for riders, volunteers, and staff.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     There is a 2 horse bumper pull horse trailer on site. There are 2 trucks available to haul horses in the event of an emergency.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Professional saddle fitter, Shelby Banning has selected an appropriately fitting saddle for each equine and makes repairs to the saddles as needed. Each horse has its own bridle rack with the name of the horse labeling it. Each bridle and bit is selected to fit appropriately and to suit each individual horses' needs/requirements based on the horses' temperament, training level, and personality. Each horse is properly assessed with a good fitting saddle, pad and riser pad, if needed. Girths are labeled and kept separate. Each horse has a sheet and blanket to keep them clean in the winter months. Every item is labeled with the horse's name on it.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     A volunteer/staff training orientation is given to volunteers and new staff members where we recognize each horse on the property and give a description of each one's temperament and personality. Each horse has a stall with their name engraved on a name plate which marks the appropriate stall. Every stall has a metal bridle/halter bracket installed on the door where each horse's appropriately fitted leather halter and attached lead rope are kept.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     During the days when we are providing services Mondays thru Saturdays, the horses are brought into their stalls to remain for the day so that the staff does not have to keep going back and forth to the pastures to retrieve the horses for the services that we provide. At the end of the day, the horses are returned to their pastures where they stay overnight unless they are kept in due to severe weather conditions. We use natural horsemanship methods and give the horses turn out as much as possible. The only time an equine is stalled both day and night is when it is on stall rest as advised by the veterinarian.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Currently, we use Nutrena feed for our equines. Specifically, we use Special Care feed for the majority of our herds and Pro Force Fiber feed for equines over 15 years of age. We also use beat pulp for several of our horses to help with digestion. Our livestock are fed twice daily, water tubs was washed out weekly and refilled daily, free choice hay (fescue or orchard mix) is always available both in the pastures and in the stalls. White salt bricks are in the stalls and large mineral salt blocks are located in each pasture. Supplements that we use when needed for certain horses are purchased from Tractor Supply and include: Dumor Hoof supplement, Dumor Senior Combo, Smart Pak Smart Tendon, Red Cell, Apple a Day Electrolytes (during show season), Glucosamine, and Corn Oil.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     In order to determine a horse's overall body condition score six key areas need to be examined: Back, Ribs, Withers, Neck, Shoulder, Tail head. Typically each key area will be within 1 point of the other key areas. At Shining Hope Farms we aim to have our horses score between 5-7 using the Henneke System of Body Condition Scoring. We aim to have our ponies score between 6-8.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     General Biosecurity Plan for Shining Hope Farms: Visitor Access to Horses - Restrict and/or monitor visitors to prevent contact with horses. Visitors can inadvertently spread disease if specific sanitation procedures are not followed. One visitor can easily spread infectious agents to many animals. It is recommended to keep visitors out of the stable and stalls if they don’t need to be there. - Maintain a record of visitors to the barn to improve the ability to respond in case there is an outbreak and spread of disease. New Horse Arrivals - Obtain and record recent history of new horse arrivals and determine previous location(s) during the past thirty days and current medical status of the horse. New horses can bring new diseases to the barn. A period of quarantine (2 weeks) before placing close to the other horses is ideal, but if not practical, use the highest biosecurity level described below that we can accomplish. Horse Equipment and Tack - Don't share any horse equipment with neighbors or other horse people. - Thoroughly clean the equipment if it has been used by other horses/people. Use detergent and disinfectant before use on any SHF horse. This includes tack, bits, rugs, feed and water bins. Request vets, farriers and others providing horse services to use clean/sanitized equipment on SHF horses. Personal Biosecurity - Some diseases can be easily carried on people's clothing, hats, hands, shoes, and hair. - Change into clean clothes and footwear; wash hands with soap and water. Sometimes it may be necessary to have a shower, wash your hair and put on clean clothes (see levels of biosecurity) Trailers and Trucks - Clean and decontaminate with disinfectant according to protocol the interior of the trailer or vans in between usage. Cleaning and Disinfectants - Proper cleaning requires removal of all soil, organic material, snot/mucus with a detergent so the disinfectant can be effective. - Disinfection can then be achieved with the use of household products such as common detergents and soaps (e.g. washing powder), washing soda, household chlorine bleach, hypochlorites, swimming pool disinfectant and citric acid. Check concentration and exposure times on the label. Illness Surveillance and Reporting - Report horses that appear ill or have a high temperature to the appropriate person in the barn. Contact the veterinarian as soon as possible. The vet can determine if the horse is in need of quarantine or a visit to the hospital and whether the illness should be reported to the Official Veterinarian or other authorities. Biosecurity During The Presence of Disease or High Risk Conditions Biosecurity Levels of Alerts and Actions are required to manage containment of disease spread. - Biosecurity begins at the front entry gate. Color-coded signs that show the different biosecurity alerts shall be posted to let visitors know that the area is bio-secure. - Personnel will distribute a copy of biosecurity guidelines to all personnel who enter the gate. All visitors will be informed of biosecurity measures before entering of the area that is in quarantine and not to enter that area. - A record of all vehicle traffic shall be maintained to track trip origination and destination in case of the need to investigate disease spread. - Appropriate personnel will post approved signs with instructions for controls during an emergency/outbreak depending on the level of bio-security as shown at the entrance to the facilities. Signs will be provided by SHF management. - The signs will be placed by the stalls or upon entry to the stable

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     An emergency evacuation plan was drawn-up by our local volunteer fire departments and installed fire extinguishers are inspected annually. Shining Hope Farms will participate in the water harvesting program in our state where large cisterns will be installed in-ground to catch rain water from the roofs through the guttering system. The water can then be recycled and used for various purposes, but most importantly as a water supply on the premise in case of a fire. The livestock is turned out in their pastures in case of hurricane or tornado warnings. The horses are kept in stalls when there is severe weather such as hail or freezing rain or below normal temperatures.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     There is perimeter fencing around the property with gated entrances as well as on-premises caretakers

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Contact: Animal Services Phone: (828) 465-8228 FAX: (828) 465-8918 jyoung@catawbacountync.gov 201 Government Services Dr Newton, NC 28658 Animal Cruelty Reporting Hotline (828) 465-7945 Animal Control animalcontrol@catawbacountync.gov

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Horse Protection Society of North Carolina Inc. 2135 Miller Road, China Grove NC 28023 hps@horseprotection.org 704-855-2978


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/23/2017

Veterinarian: Nikki S. Gooch

Clinic Name: Henry River    Street: 2383 Moss Farm Road    City: Hickory  State: NC    Zip: 28602

Phone: 828-244-8449    Email: henryrivermobile@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Sarah Lafone


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 3.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 3

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 26

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. No

Additional explanation:This is a new facility that wasn't acquired until 2017

NA> 2-a. Total number of horses on January 1, 2016.

           + 0 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

0 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

0 = Total of 2d-2f

2-g. Total number of horses on December 31, 2016.

            0 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$0     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$0     Veterinarian.

$0     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$0     Medications & Supplements.

$0     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

NA>     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

NA>     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Additional explanation:This is a new facility that wasn't acquired until 2017


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 4

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 4

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 45

4. What is the average wait list time? 0 Weeks(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 3.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 4

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 2

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 100%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Debbie Cloy

         *Facility Participation:

         Shining Hope Farms Mecklenburg Location

         Shining Hope Farms Gaston Location

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Riding Instructor

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Debbie is currently working towards her Advanced instructor certification with PATH Intl. She worked with special needs children for four years in a classroom setting and also has an RN degree.


     2. *Instructor: Elisabeth Larson

         *Facility Participation:

         Shining Hope Farms Mecklenburg Location

         Shining Hope Farms Gaston Location

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Riding Instructor


     3. *Instructor: Jessi Culbertson

         *Facility Participation:

         Shining Hope Farms Mecklenburg Location

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2008

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Level Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.United States Pony Club

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Graduate HA Level Pony Clubber


     4. *Instructor: Kelly Coney-Pacious

         *Facility Participation:

         Shining Hope Farms Mecklenburg Location

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.AHA (American Hippotherapy Association)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.HPCS is a designation of therapists who have advanced knowledge and experience in hippotherapy. For physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech and language pathologists who have been practicing their profession for at least three years (6,000 hours) and have 100 hours of hippotherapy practice within the three years prior to application for the exam.


     5. *Instructor: Leslie Lytton

         *Facility Participation:

         Shining Hope Farms Mecklenburg Location

         Shining Hope Farms Gaston Location

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2013

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Riding Instructor

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Leslie is a member of the United States Dressage Federation, the United States Equestrian Federation, and the United States Eventing Association. She also has a USDF Bronze and Silver Medal.


     6. *Instructor: Madison Hood

         *Facility Participation:

         Shining Hope Farms Gaston Location

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.CHA

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Level III with Jumping Certified Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH, Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Riding Instructor

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.AHA

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Long Lining Maximizing your Horse's Potential

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Madison Hood has been teaching lessons for the past 6 years. She has completed 2 courses through www.coursera.org, "Equine Nutrition" and "The Horse Course: Introduction to Basic Care and Management",offered by the University of Edinburgh and the University of Florida, respectfully. She also had an internship with Judge My Ride.


     7. *Instructor: Milinda Kirkpatrick

         *Facility Participation:

         Shining Hope Farms Gaston Location

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2000

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Intl. Registered Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.AHA (American Hippotherapy Association)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Long Lining Maximizing your Horse's Potential


     8. *Instructor: Sarah Lafone

         *Facility Participation:

         Shining Hope Farms Conover Location

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2014

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH Intl. Registered Riding Instructor


     9. *Instructor: Verena Stock

         *Facility Participation:

         Shining Hope Farms Mecklenburg Location

         Shining Hope Farms Gaston Location

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Certified Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.EAGALA

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2013

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Specialist