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Healing with Horses Ranch

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 07/25/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Patty D'Andrea

Employees:   Full-Time:  3  Part-Time:  3  Volunteers:  100

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Initially, at Healing With Horses Ranch, a facility orientation is presented for all employees and volunteers which includes information pertaining to Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies, Volunteer and Employee Responsibilities, Safety and Emergency Procedures, Student Confidentiality, Disabilities (inclusive of the specific types of challenges which may be evidenced) and a Site Overview comprising the programs offered.

Specific requirements indicate that all staff and volunteers directly working with students or horses will be trained to be Horse Handlers and Side walkers. This training covers how to handle horses consistently (including grooming and leading), safety around horses, and emergency procedures.

The Volunteer Manual and the Risk Management Manual are both discussed
during each specific training (including where volunteers may obtain their own copy). Job descriptions for volunteer roles are listed in the Volunteer Manual.

Additionally, volunteers will have the option of starting their training with either Horse Handler Training or Side Walker Training. Further training sessions are held to improve skills as needed, coupled with subsequent training to increase knowledge concerning the range of disabilities encountered with a major goal to increase client independence per individual case plan.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  11

Number of Board Members:  7  Number of Voting Board Members:  7

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member. John D'Andrea - Past President - is married to Patty D'Andrea - Executive Director
Davina Merkel - Equine Health Specialist is the parent of Crystal Merkel -PATH Intl Instructor

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member, and the name of the related organization. ED & Past President own facility.

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Equine Facilitated Learning is a hands-on, educational program, that uses the interactions and developing relationships between horses and humans within an environment of learning and self-discovery. Significantly, it is designed to promote personal growth and the development of positive life-long skills including socialization and pragmatic development of language skills, in an enjoyable and supportive environment. Through a curriculum of activities designed to address individual goals and needs, each equine interaction is framed to help students learn, scaffolding for cognitive development skills leading to growth in maturity, manifesting future independent skills. The ranch environment naturally lends itself to fostering a uniquely, multi-sensory classroom.

Noted as a natural partner to educate us about ourselves and society, the equine enhances skill development and offers a platform for clients to practice better ways to navigate life because:
1. Equines are herd animals who naturally want to interact. They easily engage students with their willingness to respond and cooperate. Thus, developing the skills to effectively communicate with a horse, builds self-confidence, empathy, and trust.
2. Visually, horses are large animals and therefore can easily represent some of life’s biggest challenges offering a scenario which generalizes to the obstacles faced in personal and social situations.
3. Horses are prey animals and survival is dependent upon the ability to be sensitive to both non-verbal communication and another's intent, even when it is subconscious. In response to the body language evidenced by clients, feedback is given. Interestingly enough, the feedback horses provide in response to body language is indeed valuable information, providing avenues for clients to become aware of the communication process. Of course, horses do not have ulterior motives when they interact. Thus, their non-judgmental presence creates an emotionally-safe learning environment.
4. Horses have survived for thousands of years because they create an effective social hierarchy with clear rules and responsibilities ensuring safety and harmony within the herd. Acquiring knowledge pertaining to herd dynamics and observing the horses as they interact, is another metaphor for society, providing opportunities to explore social situations and how to successfully navigate within them.

It is important to note that all of our programs including our Adaptive Riding Lessons, At-Risk Youth Programs, Hippotherapy, and Summer Camps are based on the above premises.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. N/A

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  No



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Our horses play a most vital role, functioning as our partners and thus with respect to the property, it is strictly maintained and managed specifically for them. Truly, it is our responsibility to provide the utmost and most comprehensive care for our horses. Functioning within our schedule, the horses do incredible work resulting in amazing outcomes. Therefore, it is critical that they are extremely well maintained and kept as safe and relaxed as possible.

Prior to each use, the horses will be assessed for soundness and attitude. If there is an issue, it will be noted in the Horse Conditioning Log. Classes are 1.5 hours long. No horse will be used in a back-to-back lesson with the exception of a class that happens to be very light in duration as well as in physical and emotional intensity or if a Conditioning Team Rider needs to assess a precise issue that the horse evidenced during the class session.

Ongoing assessments occur on a weekly basis and are conducted by the Conditioning Team to determine our horse's individual needs. Each horse is worked (ground work, lunged, long-lined, or ridden).

Ideally horses that enter the property will be in perfect condition. However, in reality, horses are donated to non-profits for a variety of reasons comprising an array of needs requiring intervention strategies. For example, if a horse comes into the program under weight, a weight gaining and muscle building program will be employed. This will include free choice coastal hay and grass grazing, coupled with a gradual increase in feed consumption. Their weight gain will be visually noted as well as noted via weight taping. A conditioning/training program will start that will include leading, lunging, riding at a walk/trot/and canter when they are balanced and in shape to do so, and de-sensitizing. This starts in week 1 and may take 2-3 months of continual 5-day-a-week progression, with a gradual reduction in intensity. Horses may enter the program while in this training regimen. After 30 days, the horse is reassessed to determine if it will be able to be maintained or not. If there is a negative result, the horse will be returned to his previous owner. If they cannot take him back, another suitable owner will be found. Auction is never an option.

Healing with Horses Ranch will assess its current horse needs based on student intake to determine if a horse will be added to the program. At this point, 20 horses remains our maximum capacity to maintain and support with the highest standards.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Healing with Horses Ranch is not a sanctuary for retired equines, nor a rescue organization, but rather an exceptional place where a distinctive category of equine comes to fill a special need. It is the policy of Healing with Horses Ranch to accept donations of equines from their owners for the purpose to fulfill the needs associated with the EFL/EFP/HPOT/Therapeutic Riding Program.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Due to the nature of our programs and the special needs cliental served, at any given time, when a horse evidences inappropriate behavior such as biting, kicking, rearing or bolting, it will first be carefully assessed to determine the reasons for its behavior. An evaluator will carefully examine the total scenario and what exactly transpired, including all of the individuals involved at the time of the incident as well as any possible precursors to the behavior. If it is determined that the cause for the evidenced inappropriateness is behavioral, solely on the part of the horse, then the horse is indicating that he can no longer benefit from helping our special needs clients and will be removed from the program.

Any chronically lame horse that can no longer be maintained comfortably will be retired from the program. The donor will be the first party contacted to determine if they want to take the horse back. If the equine cannot be returned to their care, a suitable home will be found for the equine. Auction is never an option.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Equines accepted into Healing with Horses Ranch's program must be mentally and physically healthy and sound, and they must be able to maintain a moderate work schedule.

Assessment initially consists of two evaluators observing the horse at its current living facility. During this initial observation, the evaluators will be assessing the horse's ground manners as well as his conformation as they take note of the owner grooming and tacking up the horse. An evaluator may get involved to determine if the horse has any sensitive spots. Further assessement includes testing for sensitivity to objects significant to child's play comprising balls, noisy toys, bags, pompoms, bubbles, etc., and additional observations occur while leading the horse at a walk and trot from both sides and while the owner rides. An evaluator will also ride the horse at a walk, trot, and canter. If the horse is accepted for trial, the owner will give us a copy of his current negative Coggins test as well as his vaccination and de-worming history.

When horses arrive at Healing with Horses Ranch, they will spend two days separated from the rest of the herd. Initially, gradual interaction will occur with the herd over the fence. When it is deemed safe to do so, the horses will be introduced to the herd, adding one of the herd members to the pasture at a time. During this time frame, the new horse will be ridden first, by the Equine Manager or PATH Intl instructors, and then by qualified conditioning team members. Each equine will successfully complete the Screening Checklist prior to going into classes. Once in classes, each equine will then complete a probationary period of class work. Every completed Screening Checklist is maintained in the onsite Horse File.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     Horses are assessed daily by Instructors, the Executive Director, and/or by volunteers that are feeding or grooming, for overall health, soundness, and attitude at least twice daily.

All horses are vaccinated annually for West Nile Virus, Flu, Rhino, E/W/and V Enceph, Tetanus, and Rabies. Any horse that leaves the property for shows or trail rides will be vaccinated twice per year for Flu, Rhino, and EWV Enceph. Without exception, all horses will come onto the property with a current negative Coggins test and will be tested annually thereafter. Further, all horses will be de-wormed with Ivermectin four times per year.

Significantly, a very fine relationship with our vet and farrier has been established and any at-risk or geriatric horses will have clear communication and input from our experts on an as needed basis.

Any horse that evidences a cough or a nasal discharge accompanied by a fever, will be isolated from the rest of the herd. Immediately, disinfection of feed buckets, fencing and anything else determined to be a causational factor for infection, will be treated with a solution of 1 cup of bleach to a gallon of water. A veterinarian will be called in to evaluate and treat.

Accessibility to a comprehensive first aid kit containing emergency numbers is kept up-to-date in the horse trailer with a second comprehensive first aid kit kept in the tack room. Again, both kits are maintained and kept up-to-date with emergency contact information and specific guidelines.

Geriatric horses as well as the rest of the herd will get at least 10 hours of turn out every day.

Due to the extreme measures taken to ensure the health and exceptional care of all of our horses, in the rare instance, if a horse should colic, of course all measures to treat him will be performed with the exception of surgery. In this case, and in any other extreme case calling for extensive medical intervention, for example in the case of a broken leg, etc., the previous owner will be called to determine if they want to take ownership and have the surgery performed. At this point the equine would no longer belong to Healing with Horses Ranch.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Humane euthanasia is only resorted to in the most severe and critical cases and only under a veterinarian's recommendation and supervision. For example, when the horse is at a point in its life where it can no longer safely ambulate and/or it is in unbearable and uncontrollable pain, where truly, all other alternatives have been exhausted and it is not fair to continue life, humane euthanasia would be sought under the direction of a veterinarian.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     There is no breeding at Healing with Horses Ranch. No stallion will be brought onto the property. If a mare were to be donated and was pregnant, the mare and foal would stay together for a minimum of 4 months.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     Yes

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training? 
     We have allowed non-invasive research such as stress testing to be done on our therapy horses

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. 
     N/A

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     Yes

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     Once the equine’s service is completed, the donor will be the first party contacted. If the equine cannot be returned to their care, a suitable home will be found for the equine.
A suitable home is usually with a volunteer of Healing with Horses Ranch. We will do a site visit before placing the retired horse anywhere.

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization has never considered this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Healing with Horses Ranch

10014 FM 973 Manor TX 78653

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Patty D'Andrea

2. Contact's Phone: 512-228-4126

3. Contact's Email: healingwithhorsesranch@gmail.com

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: John and Patty D'Andrea
10014 FM 973
Manor, TX 78653

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     50 years starting January 1, 2012 ending December 31, 2062. There is an option to re-let for 49 years and we would take this option if John and Patty D'Andrea have not already donated the property to Healing with Horses Ranch.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     There is a long term lease of 50 years for $1/year. Healing with Horses Ranch pays 75% of the real estate taxes and electric and water bills.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 3.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 40

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. The perimeter of 43 acres is fenced with hog fencing and panel fencing. There are 4 pastures fenced off on the East Campus with 3 rail wooden fencing and panel fencing and (1) 30x30 paddock and a 60X100 arena. Each of these has trees and natural wind blocks as shelter. There are (2) 12X12 and (1) 12X24 shelter. There is also a barn with 12 stalls and a metal building used for office and classroom. On the west campus, there is a round pen and an arena for additional separation if it is needed.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Horses are turned out as much as possible to graze at liberty. When they are on the east campus there are usually no more than 5 horses per pasture separated by who is getting along with each other.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 21

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     We have a 70' X 100' arena that has mulch for footing. To date, the footing has not needed to be wet down due to dustiness and even after most rains the footing is firm enough with no mud to continue lessons. We also have a 40' round pen with grass footing for lunging or lessons. Additionally, there are 30 acres of trails on which we ride that are within the perimeter fencing. We do not use these when it is very wet out due to slipperiness. If there has been flooding on the west campus, we provide lessons in the arena on the east campus.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Healing with Horses Ranch is working towards becoming a premier PATH Intl center. Though all of the standards are being adhered to, not all of the policies that they require have been put in writing. This should be completed by Dec 2017

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Healing with Horses Ranch owns a 4 horse trailer and F-250 truck so that if a horse needed to be transported in an emergency, we could do so.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Upon entering the program and then 2 x's per year each horse will get fitted for saddles. Every saddle is tested to determine if it is a good fit for the horse. The results are documented on the tack chart that is located on the google drive and on each saddle. Every horse will have their own halter and bridle that is properly fitted. As blankets are donated they will be fitted to horses to determine which horse wit will fit. Horses will only wear blankets if the temperature goes below freezing or if they are shivering.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     On both the horse locker and the stalls each horse has a stall chart that identifies the horses name, has a picture of the horse, and has it's description so that volunteers and clients can identify each horse.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Horses are not typically stall bound, but if they are, they will go into one of the 12x12 stalls until some turnout is permitted per veterinarian recommendations. When some turn out is permitted, they will move to a stall that has a run attached to it and then will go into the arena or small paddock turn out until they can be turned out with the herd.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     All horses are fed based on individual needs. They all have access to coastal hay at all times. Mineral blocks or salt blocks are provided in each field. If additional calories are needed to keep their body weight up, then either Nutrena Safe Choice Original or Safe Choice Senior is provided with additional feed increased in small increments until the ideal body weight is achieved. If supplements are needed it is per veterinarian recommendation.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The Henneke Body Conditioning Scale is used when evaluating all horses as they are being considered for adoption. All horses are additionally weight taped on arrival and when de-wormed 1/4'rly. If a horse is dropping weight or losing topline feed increases will occur. As weight is gained, their conditioning regimen increases. Weights are maintained on the equine health chart maintained on the google drive.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Healing with Horses Ranch owns 2 cats that eradicate the rodent population. At least annually the facilities is sprayed with pesticides to help control scorpions, ants, and other insects. Horses are sprayed with fly spray as needed. All stalls are cleaned daily to remove manure and urine. Manure and soiled bedding and hay will be deposited in the manure spreader and spread by trained staff or volunteers as needed. Manure is spread over fields so that is does not accumulate. Pastures are harrowed as needed to break up manure piles. Horses are de-wormed every 4 months. Dogs and cats receive monthly flea preventative to control the flea population. All horses, dogs, and cats are vaccinated at least annually to prevent disease. Healing with Horses Ranch will follow the recommendations of their veterinarian, farrier, and equine dentist to maintain health of equines, dogs, and cats. Should a horse have to be humanely euthainized, the carcass will either be removed from the property or buried on the property. The burial site will not be located in an area with a high water table or with very permeable soils away from standing, flowing, or ground water to prevent contamination of these waters, and in an area not likely to be disturbed in the near future. > 300 feet from the nearest drinking water well. At least 300 feet from the nearest creek, and at least 200 feet from adjacent property lines.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Healing with Horses Ranch has created an extensive Risk Management Plan that identifies; Hazards Specific to Use of Equines such as Falling off a Horse, Kick by a Horse, Bite by a Horse, Bucking, Getting Stepped On, and Loose Horse Natural Hazards Specific to Healing with Horses Ranch such as Site/Location, Heat Exhaustion, Snakes, Spiders, Stinging Insects, Feral Animals at Healing with Horses Ranch, Creek and Pond Man-Made Hazards at Healing with Horses Ranch such as Watering Troughs, Paddocks, Pastures, Power Lines, Highways/Freeways Natural Disasters such as Severe Storm, Fire, Flooding, Tornado , Lightning Strike Operation of Facilities and/or Equipment such as Security of the Facility, First Aid Equipment, Loss of Electrical Power, Equipment Operation, Frozen or Broken Water Lines, Helicopter Landing Zone and Treating an Injured Horse Risk Management Procedures for Horses such as Treating an Injured Horse This document is easily accessible to all staff and volunteers at Healing with Horses Ranch. It will be placed in a three ring binder in the front office next to the insurance manual. Staff and volunteer training will occur at least 4 times a year to insure that everyone knows what to do in case of an accident, incident, or emergency. First aid equipment is located in the main office and in the tack room. Instructors are trained in CPR/First Aid. Prevention is the first line of defense. Training and random safety drills will occur quarterly to help avoid problems and reduce the risks. The safety of all individuals working near or on a horse is the first priority. Protecting the animal from injury comes next. Anyone questioning their ability to ensure their safety or the safety of others in a situation with a horse should move away from the horse and ensure that others do likewise. Creek and Pond Signs are posted near each about the potential danger and that children must be accompanied with an adult at all times when near the water sources. Volunteers and staff are trained to escort unsupervised children from these areas and back to the family viewing area. Potential Drowning Remove victim from water. Assess the situation. Direct someone to call 911. Trained personnel will perform CPR until emergency personnel arrive. Direct someone to get participant’s file, blankets, and first aid kit. Fill out an incident report. Watering Troughs -. Large watering troughs are located in each of the pastures to provide drinking water for the horses. All of these are in the “Authorized Personnel Only” areas. Observation of non-authorized personnel in any of these areas Volunteers and staff are trained to escort non authorized personnel from these areas and back to the family viewing area. Potential Drowning Remove victim from water. Assess the situation. Direct someone to call 911. Trained personnel should perform CPR until emergency personnel arrive. Direct someone to get participant’s file, blankets, and first aid kit. Fill out an incident report. Highways/Freeways – FM 973 provides access to the Healing with Horses Ranch property. Hwy 130 is on the west side of the property. Emergency vehicles (fire, police, sheriff, EMT) with sirens on may pass near Healing with Horses Ranch. If horses are “spooked” by the sound of a siren, dismount students and move to the family viewing area. If a horse becomes “spooked”, an experienced Horse handler should take control of the horse until it calms down on instructor or therapist request. Vehicle accidents are possible on the nearby roads. The sound of a crash may startle a horse and cause it to be difficult to handle for a short time. If horses are “spooked” by the sound of a crash, dismount students and move to the family viewing area. If a horse becomes “spooked”, an experienced Horse handler should take control of the horse until it calms down on instructor or therapist request. Hazardous materials in the air can occur and wind conditions can blow them into the Healing with Horses Ranch area. Emergency personnel will warn Healing with Horses Ranch if this danger is present. If evacuation of people is requested, follow directions of the emergency personnel. Should evacuation become necessary, the horses will be trailered by designated staff or volunteers. The primary evacuation location would be the Travis County Show Barn, east of Healing with Horses Ranch. The backup location would be Tracee Colvin’s home at, Manor, TX 78653 which is North of Healing with Horses Ranch. All negative coggins paperwork will go with each horse. Natural Disasters In the aftermath of a serious incident at Healing with Horses Ranch, members of the press may arrive to gather and report news. ONLY the Executive Director, or in her absence the senior staff person at the site, should talk to the press. Severe storms Severe weather can interrupt activities at Healing with Horses Ranch and cause damage to the facility. Some warning is usually provided when bad weather is approaching the area. www.wunderground.com is used as a resource to determine the proximity of storms. When high winds and hail are a possibility, the senior staff person present will make a decision on stopping activities in the arena. If the Emergency Broadcasting System indicates the need, all people will be encouraged to leave or to go into the Garage on the West side of the property if it is not safe for evacuation. The horses will be moved to the east side of the creek if flooding is probable. Fire Extinguishers are located at the tack room and in the farm truck. They are bright red and clearly labeled. Remove an extinguisher and follow the printed instructions to put the fire out. Call 911. Even if fire is small and has been put out, the fire department should be notified and asked to verify there is no residual fire that is not visible. If the fire is growing larger and cannot be contained, move all people to a safe area outside of the west side entry gate. Should evacuation be necessary, the horses will be trailered by designated staff or volunteers. The primary evacuation location would be the Travis County Show Barn, east of Healing with Horses Ranch. The backup location would be Tracee Colvin’s home at, Manor, TX 78653 which is North of Healing with Horses Ranch. All negative coggins paperwork will go with each horse. Equipment Fire Remove an extinguisher and follow the printed instructions to put the fire out. Remove the equipment from service until it has been inspected and repaired if needed Call 911. Even if fire is small and has been put out, the fire department should be notified and asked to verify there is no residual fire that is not visible. Flooding With heavy rains predicted or imminent, the senior staff person present will make a decision on stopping activities in the arena and moving animals and people to designated safe locations. The primary evacuation location would be the Travis County Show Barn. The arena is located East of Healing with Horses Ranch. The backup location would be Tracee Colvin’s home at, Manor, TX 78653 which is North of Healing with Horses Ranch. All negative coggins paperwork will go with each horse. Tornado With a tornado warning issued, steps should be taken to protect both people and horses at the facility. The warehouse building is the designated safe room for people to move into. If time is available, the horses should be moved from the pastures to the eastside pasture. Should evacuation be necessary, the horses will be trailered by designated staff The primary evacuation location would be the Travis County Show Barn. The arena is located East of Healing with Horses Ranch. The backup location would be Tracee Colvin’s home at, Manor, TX 78653 which is North of Healing with Horses Ranch. All negative coggins paperwork will go with each horse. Lightning Strike During severe thunderstorms, it is possible that lightning could strike the facility. Older wooden buildings and trees are not protected and a strike may cause damage and/or a fire. Should lightning start a fire, refer to section 2 above. The immediate problem will be panicked horses from the noise. They should quickly recover from the fright. If it is necessary to handle a horse during such an event, only experienced horse handlers should do it.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     There is a gate that is chained shut at night and has a keypad opening. Gate code is needed to enter the property. Fields are labeled with authorized personnel only signs. There are cameras at the gate, in the stalls, and in the barn for monitoring as needed. The owner of the property lives on the property.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Travis County Sherriff Dept P.O. Box 1748 Austin, TX 78767 512-854-9770 (phone) or 512-974-0845 OPT #3

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     PATH Intl Equine Welfare Committee PO Box 33150 Denver, Colorado 80233 National Office Physical Address: 7475 Dakin Street Suite #600 Denver, CO 80221 (map) www.pathintl.org (800) 369-RIDE (7433) Fax (303) 252-4610 and/or American Association of Equine Practitioners 4033 Iron Works Parkway Lexington, KY 40511 Phone: (859)233-0147 (800)443-0177 (U.S. & Canada) Fax: (859) 233-1968 Email: aaepoffice@aaep.org


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 02/24/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Jonathon Cohen

Clinic Name: JLC Mobile Veterinary Service    Street: 969 Upper Elgin River Road Elgin, TX    City: Elgin  State: TX    Zip: 78621

Phone: 512-595-4093    Email: hoofvet@mindspring.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Crystal Merkel

     2. Instructor: Elyse Greenberg

     3. Instructor: Patty D'Andrea


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 14.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 15

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 30

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

12 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 5 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

17 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 0 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 2 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

2 = Total of 2d-2f

15 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            15 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$12000     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$400     Bedding.

$4600     Veterinarian.

$3900     Farrier.

$2000     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$1800     Medications & Supplements.

$500     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$3000     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$28200     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

4555     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $6
Question 3 ($28,200 ) divided by Question 4 (4555).

Average length of stay for an equine: 268 days
Question 4 (4555) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (17).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? Most of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 60

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 60

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 52

4. What is the average wait list time? 0 Weeks(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 2.00  Un-Mounted: 1.00  Total: 3

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 90%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Crystal Merkel

         *Facility Participation:

         Healing with Horses Ranch

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered status with work towards advanced level certification. Maintained by 20 hours of continuing education and CPR/First Aid Certification annually.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Special Olympics

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equestrian Coach


     2. *Instructor: Elyse Greenberg

         *Facility Participation:

         Healing with Horses Ranch

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.


     3. *Instructor: Patty D'Andrea

         *Facility Participation:

         Healing with Horses Ranch

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2004

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered level / advance level therapeutic riding. Maintained by 20 hours of continuing education and CPR/First Aid Certification annually.

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH Intl

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Specialist

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Special Olympics

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2006

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equestrian Coach