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Ray of Light Farm

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 05/12/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Bonnie Buongiorne

Employees:   Full-Time:  3  Part-Time:  6  Volunteers:  40

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. Each volunteer is trained carefully with a specifically designed one on one training program, which involves a 30 day evaluation (in the form of interactive discussion and documentation of discussion for the volunteer file). We also have a Ray of Light Farm handbook. On a daily basis our volunteers are updated with a morning meeting to discuss the plan for the day.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  12

Number of Board Members:  9  Number of Voting Board Members:  8

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 90%

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Horse and Donkey Rescue: Premarin foals, nurse mare foals, owner surrenders, horses slated for slaughter and/or auction, pregnant mares in need of care, mistreated animals, etc.
B.I.T.: Basics In Training is a program initially designed to help our Premarin babies grow to be well-mannered adults, beginning with gentling them into a halter. The program has four levels and teaches both humans and horses the gentle methods of creating a well-trained horse. It has become the base for all our training, riding, and horse handling, focusing on working in partnership with the horse.
HORSE FEATHERS: Vets learn basic horsemanship, tacking, driving. Instruction given by Dave Bradham, Certified PATH Riding and Driving instructor. Providing beneficial equine therapy to those who have so bravely served our country.
Tiny Trotters: An interactive program for preschoolers designed to educate young people about the importance of being kind to animals, and introduce them to the world of horses and rescue animals.
Therapeutic Riding Program: We are a PATH, INTL certified riding center
Hoofbeats: An educational program about horses designed for area schools and organizations that want to learn more in-depth concepts of horsemanship. It includes topics such as anatomy, physiology, hoof care, dental care, pathologies and illnesses, barn management, body language of humans and horses and how that is seen through the eyes of the horse.
Filly Night: An adult women's riding and community building program in which adults are mentored by youth a win-win situation. Our teens learn to teach, building their self-confidence and leadership skills.
Birthday Parties: Weekly children's parties that consist of a farm tour, multiple animal interactions, and a pony ride.
Able bodied riding lessons
Pony rides for general public
Seminar weekend for Women
Leadership Institute from Hartford Seminary - a weekend experience focusing on the horse, other animals at the farm and our relationship with them.
Equine Wellness Fair - One day event exploring new and ancient alternative therapies applied to the equine world.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. Annual Fundraising events: Easter Egg Hunt, Silent Auction, Halloween Hayrides, Winter Wonderland, Horse Feathers Fundraising dinner, Wine Tasting Event
Employment training programs for youth and disabled individuals and volunteer opportunities for Veterans with PTS
Community service programs for area schools, churches, Veterans, and the Middlesex county court system

Other animals rescued and cared for include: goats, pigs, donkeys, mules, peacocks, guinea fowl, ducks, llamas, rabbits, guinea pigs, sheep, alpaca, tortoises, and several breeds of chickens.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  Yes



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Our equine management philosophy treats each horse as an individual with specific needs in regard to diet, exercise, handling, medical needs and turnout needs. All horses have stalls with daily turnout (minimum 6 hours per day) or, a few have shelters with round the clock turnout depending on their needs. Our training and rehabilitation practices basically follow natural horsemanship guidelines and ALWAYS start from the ground up, assessing the conditioning and soundness of the horse with each session, and not doing mounted work until the horse is physically and mentally ready. Due to the number of feral horses we have brought along, our philosophy in training simply states that if a session is not of benefit to the horse, then it needs to be altered until it is. Over 75 untouched horses (Premarins, mustangs, nurse mares and orphaned foals) have passed through our farm in the past 8 years. Some are still here receiving training. Our relationship with the horses is based on earning their trust and then guiding them in their education.

Our philosophy with respect to rehabilitation and use of horses in the program is the same. If a session is not of benefit to the horse, then it is not a good session plan and must be altered to what the horse needs. This applies to ALL horse handling, even with the simple task of inviting the horse to place his head into the halter before a session or for being turned out, and ending with release of the horse at the end of a session. Part of our training program is to stay mindful of what each horse needs to be healthy, happy, and as fit as his body can be.

On average, Ray of Light Farm has 51 horses in its care. We try to keep our number of rescue horses at 10 at any given time, but that is not always possible. Five years ago, we accepted 19 Premarin babies and feed lot rescues in one weekend as part of a rescue mission. It was immediately followed with a phone call from State Police to help round up 4 mustangs that were running the area. They came here until we could teach them to halter and find other homes.

We will accept suffering horses, or at risk horses, in any condition that can be rehabilitated.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     All of the above. We work with the local police, our community, ARK Watch Foundation, and the larger rescue community in order to help as many animals as we are able to.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     There is no such thing as a horse that is no longer useful. They can always do something, even if it is as small as bringing a smile or a sense of well-being to a visitor. Horses that need to be retired generally stay here unless a better place to live out their lives comes along. Happiness for the horse counts in that decision, something we learned from an aged mare named Elka that had always been in a barn with people around. We sent her to a quieter place with pasture and other horses. She ended up biting and striking at her new caretaker, who we knew and trusted. She was miserable there, so she came back here and happily lived out her life.

We have not had the experience of having an unmanageable horse that remained unmanageable.

Our website, Facebook page, local media and our visibility has helped us to attract potential adoption and foster homes. In most cases, the requirement is made that foster or adoptions must be preceded with adequate time at this farm to get to know the horse (regular visits for several weeks).

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Our initial assessment process for each horse varies to some degree. If a horse is coming in from a known source with health records, current Coggins and rabies, and seemingly fit and healthy, we would not ask for an emergency veterinary consult unless something seemed wrong. We would instead segregate and keep the horse under observation until we were certain the horse was healthy.

If a horse is coming from an unknown or questionable source, we would immediately institute a 3 week quarantine and place them on the section(s) of the farm that can facilitate a solid quarantine procedure. Quarantine would be lifted after 3 weeks if all horses in that space remain healthy.

If a horse is in questionable condition, we immediately call for veterinary consult for complete physical exam. Follow-up to this visit often entails being seen by chiropractor, dentist, nutritional advisors, and/or farrier. We have, in the past, transported horses to Tufts Veterinary School for intensive care cases that were beyond our capabilities for the initial care. (We had such a circumstance recently, the result being a successful surgery.)

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     We assess and monitor the health of our horses on a daily basis through our hands-on methods of caring for them, and through daily observation of behavior, habits, manure production, appetite, water consumption (checked 3 times each day), even going so far as to noticing whether a horse is taking a nap at a normal time for them.

We have a regular vaccination, twice yearly, and worming schedule as suggested by our veterinarian.

Health and veterinary care for injured/at-risk/or geriatric horses is accomplished through good communication among staff members and through care charts. These charts are designed with veterinary input and have specific instructions for such items as medications and their scheduled times, hand-walking schedule, bandage changes or wound care, with places to initial each time a treatment is given.

Geriatric horses, horses about to foal, and horses with serious issues are monitored at least four times per day with our feeding and watering schedules and, in extreme circumstances, with a baby monitor and camera through the night.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Our euthanasia policy is that this procedure must be performed by a licensed veterinarian and will be performed only when there is no reasonable chance of return to health for the horse. There is no other ethical reason to euthanize.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     There is a NO breeding clause as well as a gelding clause in our adoption and foster care agreements. In the event that a colt leaves too young to be gelded here, gelding must take place as soon as he reaches the appropriate age and health status.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     Yes

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     There are many variables in selecting a foster home, but first and foremost is the appropriate match between foster home and horse. Experience level of the owner must match the education of the horse. We have a saying that green and green = black and blue, and we do not want to set the horse or the family that adopts him up for failure. That is why we require some quality time be spent and a relationship developed with the horse here before adoption or foster is even a consideration. In most cases, the horse will be very instrumental in the selection process. A horse will not behave well for people he or she does not like or trust. We are attentive to that and decide accordingly.

We also do a site check to make sure the new home will be safe for them, that shelter is adequate, and that there is a companion horse or horses. If there are other horses on the property, we check to make sure that they are in good health and not running in the opposite direction from the people who take care of them. Monitoring is done by way of occasional visits for those who do not check in with us. Eventually, these visits diminish if confidence builds that the horse has found its forever home.

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: $751 to $1,000

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine level of training.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization approves of this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Ray of Light Farm

232 Town Street East Haddam CT 06423

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Bonnie Buongiorne

2. Contact's Phone: 860-873-1895

3. Contact's Email: info@rayoflightfarm.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 6.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 10

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. We do not have access to much pasture, so good quality timothy/grass hay is fed four times a day. We have about 16 paddocks, all fenced most with electric fence. We have two barns, the first has thirty-four 12x12 stalls and three 6x6 stalls for the minis.The second barn has twenty stalls, some have been modified to accommodate pregnant mares. Six of these stalls have walkouts to paddocks and we have twelve stalls in run-out sheds for those who need 24/7 turnout.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     We make sure that all the horses in our paddocks get along well and allow each other to eat and drink when needed. We try to keep the minis together and the larger horses together. The Premarin foals are usually kept together, as are the nurse foals, and the mares and foals are usually kept in their own paddocks. We keep a close eye on our horses daily to ensure that no one is being a bully or being bullied. We clean the paddocks several times daily to ensure cleanliness.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 7

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Training takes place in our two rings, one indoors (60x120) and an outdoor ring. The footing is a combination of sand and rubber. It was chosen carefully, being mindful of dust as well as comfort for horses and riders.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     The Connecticut Horse Environmental Awareness Program

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     There is always a truck and trailer on the property ready to be used in any horse emergency. We also have a full service veterinary ambulatory practice on call 24/7.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Ray of Light Farm is fortunate to have a tack store sharing the property which gives us the capacity to keep our tack in prime condition. Saddles are fitted to each individual horse according to tree size, height of wither, muscling and length of back. For hard to fit horses, recommendations are taken from chiropractor or professional saddle fitter. Tack (bridles, saddles, leathers, girths) is cleaned regularly, repaired or replaced as needed. Blankets are repaired or replaced as needed.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     New staff and volunteers always work in a buddy system with senior staff to learn the operations of the farm, this includes the handling of horses, where their paddocks are, and where their stalls are. Stalls are both numbered and labeled with the horse's names, either on a name plate or a name tag, many halters have the horse's names on them as well. Additionally, there is a chart showing a map of numbered paddocks and the names of the horses that get turned out in those paddocks. This is located in the central area of the main barn where the staff and volunteers meet daily before opening to the public.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Ray of Light Farm has two main barns, one of which has a 60x120 indoor arena (with ramp access for physically challenged riders), thirty-four 12x12 stalls, and three 6x6 stalls that house mini horses/donkeys. The second main barn has the capacity for twenty stalls, however, some of them have been converted into specialty housing for other animals, one double stall suitable for pregnant mares that come in (we've had one pregnant rescue come in each of the last 5 years,) as well as two 12x18 stalls for horses that need larger accommodations inside. There are six walkout stalls for horses that need free choice to be in or out, and there are twelve stalls in run-out sheds for those who need 24/7 turnout. Horses who live inside the barn are hand-walked to their turnouts every day (weather permitting). Horses living outside are also handled on a regular basis. Horses are not stall bound unless injury/rehab requires stall rest. If the injured horse is allowed to be hand-walked, they will have a stall near the indoor arena and be walked as per recommendations of the veterinarian(s).

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Ray of Light Farm uses strict feeding guidelines specific to the needs of each horse. Because we do not have access to much pasture, good quality timothy/grass hay is fed 4 times per day beginning with an early morning feeding and ending with a night feeding. The largest hay quantities are given in their turnout areas and at the late night feeding, with smaller feedings being given in the early morning and as they come back in from their turnout. Feed is given twice a day; once after the early morning hay, and again an hour after they come in from turnout. Each stall has a card with feeding instructions that specifies the amount of feed to be given and when. Feed is tailored to individual requirements. We feed 100% through the Dynamite program. They are a 75 year old holistic company that makes their pelleted grain ration using cold process and without the use of chemicals, preservatives or fillers. All horses have access to Free Choice Minerals in their stalls and are supplemented daily with DynaPro, a prebiotic liquid that is added to their grain in the evening. Depending on the needs of each horse, they also receive either TNT (Total Nutritional Top-dress) or Dynamite Plus supplements. As proud as we have been in the past of the condition we kept our horses in, we are elated with the changes that have taken place through our feeding program.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The Henneke System is used to help us identify the specific needs of each horse and what diet and lifestyle would best benefit their situation. Those with a body score below 4 would get additional feedings through the day (usually midday and/or at night hay), and any exercise would be geared toward good circulation and gentle conditioning. Those with a score of 7 or more would be given lighter calorie foods and gentle conditioning with a goal toward regaining fitness and a healthy weight. We've been fortunate to have very few come in at or under a 3, though one of our recent nurse foals struggled in the 2-3 zone for some time.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     We are fortunate to have access to: - Cremation facility for carcass disposal -¢ Neighboring farms that want our manure to spread on their fields - A dump trailer for daily removal of manure We have not had much need for veterinary intervention in this area, other than discussions of keeping current with deworming research.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Weather related issues have been addressed by: - Purchasing a generator that allows for constant access to water in power outages - Keeping portable fencing near the indoor for additional stalls during blizzard, ice, tornado, or hurricane conditions Fire safety has been addressed by: - Installing fire extinguishers at the main entrances of each barn - Training staff to hang halters on stalls with leadlines attached and in the "ready position" for haltering the horse

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     Safety is a main concern for both horse and human. There is a gate at each driveway that is chained shut each night. Additionally, there are gates within the property that separate the public from the private areas. These remain closed during our open hours and keep the horses and public out of harms way from each other. We also have a walkie-talkie system to alert if a horse manages to get loose, and a protocol for closing numerous other gates to keep the loose horse in a confined area until he can be caught. There are two staff members who live on the property, one in the main house and one in the cabin.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Usually the East Haddam animal control officer as well as the State Police call Ray of Light Farm when there is a horse related concern in the area. So we are the organization responsible for investigating abuse.

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Connecticut Farm Bureau 78 Beaver Rd. Suite A Wethersfield, CT 06109 860-768-1100 info@cfba.org CHC - Connecticut Horse Council P.O.Box 121 Clinton, CT 06413 860-669-2466 Contact:Michael Houde, President Lgoulet@att.net


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/29/2017

Veterinarian: Michael Relly

Clinic Name: Connecticut Equine Clinic    Street: 824 Flanders Road    City: Coventry  State: CT    Zip: 06238

Phone: 860-742-1580    Email: ctequineclinic@gmail.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Alexandra Larrick

     2. Instructor: Cathy Langerand

     3. Instructor: Dave Bradham

     4. Instructor: Sally Sanders

     5. Instructor: Sanna Piispanen

     6. Instructor: Susan MaCauley


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 51.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 51

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 60

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:No cost for manure removal as it is moved to a neighboring farm for use in his fields.

55 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 3 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

58 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 1 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 3 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 3 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

7 = Total of 2d-2f

51 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            49 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            2 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$96858     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$17640     Bedding.

$14355     Veterinarian.

$13200     Farrier.

$2035     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$9061     Medications & Supplements.

$3419     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$92506     Horse Care Staff.

$9668     Horse Training.

$3742     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$262484     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

18615     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $14
Question 3 ($262,484 ) divided by Question 4 (18615).

Average length of stay for an equine: 321 days
Question 4 (18615) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (58).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-All of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 700

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 47

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 42

4. What is the average wait list time? 5 Weeks(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 1.00  Un-Mounted: 2.00  Total: 3

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 4

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 50%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Alexandra Larrick

         *Facility Participation:

         Ray of Light Farm

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Riding instructor for most programs


     2. *Instructor: Cathy Langerand

         *Facility Participation:

         Ray of Light Farm

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2005

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.CHA instructor and member #12526

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH INTL)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2007

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Certified instructor for therapeutic programs

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Reach Out to Horses (ROTH)

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Reach Out to Horses is a horse gentling program that teaches natural horsemanship and foal gentling


     3. *Instructor: Dave Bradham

         *Facility Participation:

         Ray of Light Farm

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2004

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.P.A.T.H. Certified Riding and Driving Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Certified Horseman Association

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Certified Riding Instructor


     4. *Instructor: Sally Sanders

         *Facility Participation:

         Ray of Light Farm

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Pace University

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1987

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Advanced Certificate for Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Pace University

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)1987

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Associate's Degree in Equine Science


     5. *Instructor: Sanna Piispanen

         *Facility Participation:

         Ray of Light Farm

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No


     6. *Instructor: Susan MaCauley

         *Facility Participation:

         Ray of Light Farm

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? No