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Days End Farm Horse Rescue

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 05/05/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  Erin Ochoa, Executive Director

Employees:   Full-Time:  14  Part-Time:  4  Volunteers:  1100

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. DEFHR has a Policy and Procedures Handbook covering training for employees. The handbook covers on- and off-site training opportunities, as well as job descriptions, evaluations, business ethics, conflicts of interest, benefits, work rules, disciplinary action, etc. Policies and procedures are also in place to ensure that all volunteers undergo an orientation process where farm rules and safety are introduced; DEFHR history, programs and volunteer opportunities are reviewed; and equine body language, handling and grooming are taught. On their first day, volunteers receive training specific to the work they will be doing.

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  12

Number of Board Members:  20  Number of Voting Board Members:  6

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member, and the name of the related organization. The Executive Director owns one of the properties at which the organization conducts its programs

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 100

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     DEFHR rescues, rehabilitates, trains and adopts horses. The farm houses 50-80 horses daily, accepts about 115 impounded horses yearly, has rehabilitated over 2,260 horses since 1989, and adopted out 94% of them. Selected horses are in off-site training or off-site sponsor care (SOS) homes. Our SOS Program helps care for horses that take longer to adopt.The farm has a trained staff and volunteers to provide critical and extended care, including round-the-clock care and monitoring. DEFHR's volunteer Large Animal Rescue Team offers free-of-charge rescue services locally, as well as national disaster emergency response. The organization maintains a fully equipped emergency response horse trailer with specialized equipment for 24/7 response. DEFHR also provides instruction to individuals regarding horse care and proper maintenance.

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 2

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. Emergency and rescue services are available for large animals that include, but are not limited to, equines. DEFHR currently has six goats, two sheep and two miniature donkeys rescued from situations of abuse and neglect. These animals help promote awareness and compassion during on-site events and educational programs.

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  Yes



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     Staff Trainer, Sara Nyman Strauss, is responsible for assessing each horse that is officially turned over to Days End (post-court case), training when appropriate and meeting with adopters. She also oversees the DEFHR Family Forever ("foster care") Programs for horses that take longer to adopt. We have 6 ambassador horses and 2 donkeys that help with education and outreach; they are not currently available for adoption.
Sara and assistant trainer Leigha Schrader coordinate regularly with a team of skilled volunteers who help train or school and exercise horses according to their individual needs and abilities. Each team member must record their activities with their project horses, and these training logs are shared with prospective adopters. All horses that are physically able are allowed pasture turnout for exercise as well. Horses in any condition are accepted by DEFHR in the hopes that they can be rehabilitated. Dedicated staff and volunteers are able to monitor and rehabilitate a horse 24 hours per day if necessary (in shifts).
Currently, DEFHR can accept up to 80 horses.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Days End Farm Horse Rescue rescues and rehabilitates horses that have been impounded by animal protection officials. Occasionally, when we are in need of an ambassador program horse, we will take in one that does not come through animal protection authorities.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     Horses that cannot be regularly ridden or are older and/or infirm become part of the Save our Seniors (SOS) Program. Prospective SOS facilities are subject to approval. Once approved, horses can be housed there and provided with supplements, medicines, food and relevant care; the SOS caretaker pays for all supplies.

In addition, some horses go off site for professional training.

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     New horses undergo a quarantine period of at least two weeks during which time veterinarians assist with assessing their health status. DEFHR documents the initial health issues and the recovery process as evidence so that the horses' caretakers can be held accountable for the cruelty and neglect inflicted on their horse(s). We coordinate with the impounding agency responding to the neglected and abused horses and other agencies dealing with accidents or animals in danger. All medical needs, including necessary vaccinations and Coggins testing, are completed by a licensed veterinarian or with veterinary consultation as appropriate. All health activities are documented for each animal in an ongoing health record. These records are available to potential adopters.

Once the horses are deemed physically able, they are evaluated via a test ride with the staff trainer to assess suitability for riding/ training/ retraining and the kind of potential adopter is determined (e.g., beginner, advanced).

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     The Equine Health Director oversees the animals' health. Once out of rehabilitation, each horse is entered into a maintenance program, which includes daily handling, feeding, grooming, seasonal vaccinations, regular deworming, farrier and dental care. Individualized meals are created for each horse, depending on their specific dietary needs. Similar to our rehabilitation program, geriatric horses requiring more feed to maintain weight are fed multiple small meals per day. Each meal is watered down to decrease the risk of choke or colic, as well as to make it easier to chew and digest. They are vaccinated for West Nile Virus and Potomac Horse Fever in the spring, and Eastern and Western Encephalomylitis/Tetanus (EWT), Influenza, Rhinopneumonitis, and Rabies in the fall. EWT, Influenza, and Rhinopneumonitis are also boostered every 6 months for horses going to off-site events and shows. Horses are on a 2-3 month rotational deworming schedule throughout the year. Dental examinations and floats are done every 6 months to one year, depending on each horse's needs. Hooves are trimmed every 4-8 weeks. Horses that require shoes to maintain comfort are shod every 4-6 weeks. Horses with serious health issues are seen by a veterinarian regularly, who assesses their ongoing needs and designates individual treatment plans.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     All decisions regarding euthanasia are extremely difficult and are made in consultation with a veterinarian. While some rescued horses make a full recovery, some are more challenging and need more medical or farrier assistance. We document the initial condition of the equines as received and throughout their recovery. We testify to those facts for the States Attorney during prosecution. If temperament and overall condition allows them to be placed for adoption and suitable new owners can be found, they are adopted; on occasion this may not be possible because of factors such as chronic pain, lifelong expense of care, or dangerous temperament; occasionally some of those equines may be humanely euthanized.
Circumstances under which we might consider euthanasia a reasonable and responsible choice include:
Incurable or progressive disease
Incurable or transmissible diseases
Chronic or severe lameness
Inoperable colic
Severe debilitation in old age
Severe traumatic injury
Dangerous behavioral traits
Undue suffering for any reason

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     DEFHR has a no-breeding policy. Any stallion coming to DEFHR is carefully segregated. Once ownership is legally turned over and the horses are fully rehabilitated, stallions are castrated. When a horse is adopted, DEFHR retains breed registration papers to help enforce this policy. The adoption contracts have a "no breeding clause." Mares and newborn foals are kept together between four and six months respectively.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training?  NA

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. NA

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     Yes

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     Some horses go off site under our SOS Program, into what are considered foster homes. Before any horse goes off site, the prospective foster caregiver is evaluated by our trainer. Foster homes are screened by specially trained volunteers who complete farm visits on a regular basis (see Farm Inspection Guidelines).

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: $201 to $500

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine level of training.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine age.
  Adoption fees may vary depending on the equine health and soundness.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Our organization approves of this concept.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed:



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 2

.

Location 1 of 2
Days End Farm Horse Rescue

1372 Woodbine Rd. Woodbine MD 21797

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Erin Ochoa

2. Contact's Phone: 301-854-5037

3. Contact's Email: erin@defhr.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

5-8. Not Applicable.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 5.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 57

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. There are 2 main grazing fields that are approximately 12 acres each, and 2 sacrifice fields of approximately 5 acres each. Nine small paddocks are used for layup and introductory turn-out. There is 1 flash grazing field of 2 acres, and 1 main barn. Another shed row with paddocks contains stalls, for a total of 27 stalls. There are 9 run-in sheds throughout the farm, and all of the fencing is board or high tensile wire.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Our main population is split into two herds, mares and geldings, with each having their own grazing pastures. These pastures are mowed and rested as needed in order to maintain the grass in a healthy state. The smaller fields and paddocks are rotated, cleaned and rested as appropriate. The sizes of the paddocks and pastures determine the number of horses housed in those areas.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 23

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Riding and training take place in an outdoor arena with a mixed footing of sand, rubber and felt. Horses are not exercised in the ring if the footing is frozen or too hard. It is regularly cleaned of manure and harrowed. A bluestone round pen is often used for ground training and under saddle evaluations. Horses are not worked or ridden if temperatures exceed 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     We are accredited through GFAS and TAA.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     DEFHR has two emergency response trailers for emergency equine transportation.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     Sara Nyman Strauss, the head trainer, is responsible for fitting and assigning appropriate tack for each horse (saddles, bridles, bits, additional equipment as necessary). Tack (saddles and bridles) is numbered to ensure proper use and all volunteers or on-site foster care providers are instructed by the head trainer in the tack that is appropriate for each horse. Trained staff, the farm manager and assistant farm manager are responsible for fitting and utilizing blankets and turn out sheets that are sized for the animal and appropriate to the animal's needs and the weather conditions.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Clip boards with each horse's picture and stats are kept in the centrally located feed room. Each horse is brought in from the pastures for feeding at designated times during the day and has a designated feeding station; staff/volunteers have access to a map showing where each horse goes. For horses that are stalled, charts are kept on the outside of the stall identifying the occupant.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Stall bound horses are led to an outside paddock daily when possible for fresh air and exercise, or if they are restricted to more stall rest they may be simply taken for a daily short walk and returned to their stall. Since exercise is important for health and well being, providing it for each horse is a priority.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Brittney Carow, equine health director, is responsible for managing feed, preparing individual feed plans for every horse and feeding the horses. Trained staff and volunteers prepare individualized feed twice a day for the general population and several times a day for horses in rehabilitation.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The Henneke Body Conditioning Score is used to gauge how malnourished a horse is. That and a veterinarian's evaluation/diagnosis help determine what a recovering horse is fed, how much exercise he/she is given and when he/she can begin training/preparing for adoption.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Any new horse arriving at DEFHR is put into quarantine for a minimum of 2 weeks, and longer if advised by a veterinarian. Large, visible signs are posted to minimize contact with the quarantined animals. Anyone coming into contact with them must disinfect their hands and feet on leaving the quarantine area. If a biosecurity hazard has been identified with the help of a veterinarian, strict quarantine policies and procedures are put into place for as long as necessary. This includes taking extra precautionary measures such as disinfecting stalls, fences, etc. that come into contact with an infected horse, and disposing of manure safely.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Our emergency preparedness plan covers relocation and evacuation of horses during floods and tornadoes. It has procedures to be followed in the event of a barn fire, and critical material resources to have on hand in the event of an emergency.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The caretaker who is on premises is a police officer. His vehicle on property adds extra security!

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Deborah Baracco, Administrator and Head of Animal Control Howard County Police Department and Lynn Neser, Animal Control Officer Supervisor for the Animal Control Office Staff Howard County Police Department 3410 Court House Dr Ellicott City, MD (410) 750-0845 dbaracco@howardcountymd.gov

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Ross Peddicord, Maryland Horse Industry Board/Maryland Department of Agriculture, 50 Harry S Truman Pkwy, Annapolis MD 21401, ross.peddicord@maryland.gov, (410) 841-5861


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/22/2017

Veterinarian: Rich Fofa, DVM

Clinic Name: Monocacy Equine Veterinary Associates    Street: P.O. Box 155    City: Beallsville  State: MD    Zip: 20839

Phone: 301-607-4025    Email: contactus@monocacyequine.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Brittney Carow

     2. Instructor: DeEtte Gorrie

     3. Instructor: Erin Ochoa

     4. Instructor: Nicky Wetzelberger

     5. Instructor: Sara Strauss


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 70.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 70

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 80

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

60 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 66 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 9 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

135 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 32 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 2 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 16 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

50 = Total of 2d-2f

85 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            85 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$66349     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$27264     Bedding.

$49956     Veterinarian.

$28839     Farrier.

$7935     Dentist.

$8280     Manure Removal.

$25814     Medications & Supplements.

$6266     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$140352     Horse Care Staff.

$6845     Horse Training.

$18968     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$386868     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

22903     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $17
Question 3 ($386,868 ) divided by Question 4 (22903).

Average length of stay for an equine: 170 days
Question 4 (22903) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (135).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? Most of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.



Location 2 of 2
DE2

20514 Park Hall Road Rohrersville MD 21779

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: Erin Ochoa

2. Contact's Phone: 301-580-2918

3. Contact's Email: erin@defhr.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Erin Ochoa
20514 Park Hall Road
Rohrersville, MD 21779
301-580-2918

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     Started in 2011; month-to-month lease in place, renewed monthly as needed.

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     The owner is compensated monthly and furnishes the following: access to electricity, water, fields and barn for DEFHR staff, volunteers and horses; maintenance of the property to ensure horses do not escape or become injured; snow removal and mowing of pastures.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? No

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 0.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 13

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. There are 3 larger pastures with split rail fences that have a line of electrical tape at the top. Each pasture has a large run-in shed for the horses. There are also 2 medium sized fields with no-climb wire without run-in sheds that are used for flash turn-out. Two smaller paddocks are attached to 2 oversized stalls, and 2 metal round pens are used for turn-out. The main, metal barn includes 15 stalls and 2 large indoor paddocks. A feed room and tack room are separate from this barn.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Horses are on pasture half the day and stalled the other half to keep the fields in good shape. Paddocks are mucked daily. Fields are dragged to break up manure.

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 12

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     There is no riding or training at this site. It is strictly for rehabilitation. A round pen is used for minor evaluations.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     N/A

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     DEFHR has two emergency response trailers for emergency equine transportation.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? No

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     No horses are ridden at this site. It is strictly for rehabilitation. Trained staff and the barn manager are responsible for fitting and utilizing blankets and turn out sheets that are sized for the animal and appropriate to the animal’s needs and the weather conditions.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     Clip boards with each horse's picture and stats are kept in the centrally located feed room. Each horse is brought in from the pastures for feeding at designated times during the day and has a designated feeding station; staff/volunteers have access to a map showing where each horse goes. For horses that are stalled, charts are kept on the outside of the stall identifying the occupant.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     Stall bound horses are led to an outside paddock daily when possible for fresh air and exercise, or if they are restricted to more stall rest they may be simply taken for a daily short walk and returned to their stall. Since exercise is important for health and well being, providing it for each horse is a priority.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Samantha Brooks, our farm manager, is responsible for managing feed inventory, preparing individual feed plans and feeding the horses. Trained staff and volunteers prepare individualized feed twice a day for the general population and several times a day for horses in rehabilitation.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     The Henneke Body Conditioning Score is used to gauge how malnourished a horse is. That and a veterinarian's evaluation/diagnosis help determine what a recovering horse is fed, how much exercise he/she is given and when he/she can begin training/preparing for adoption.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Any new horse arriving at DEFHR is put into quarantine for a minimum of 2 weeks, and longer if advised by a veterinarian. Large, visible signs are posted to minimize contact with the quarantined animals. Anyone coming into contact with them must disinfect their hands and feet on leaving the quarantine area. If a biosecurity hazard has been identified with the help of a veterinarian, strict quarantine policies and procedures are put into place for as long as necessary. This includes taking extra precautionary measures such as disinfecting stalls, fences, etc. that come into contact with an infected horse, and disposing of manure safely.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Our emergency preparedness plan covers relocation and evacuation of horses during floods and tornadoes. It has procedures to be followed in the event of a barn fire, and critical material resources to have on hand in the event of an emergency.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The on-premises caretaker is a police officer. His vehicle adds extra security!

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Washington County Humane Society 13011 Maugansville Road Hagerstown, MD 21740 egarrett@hswcmd.org

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     Ross Peddicord, Maryland Horse Industry Board/Maryland Department of Agriculture, 50 Harry S Truman Pkwy, Annapolis MD 21401, ross.peddicord@maryland.gov, (410) 841-5861


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 03/22/2017

Veterinarian: Monocacy Equine Veterinary Associates

Clinic Name: Monocacy Equine Veterinary Associates    Street: P.O. Box 155    City: Beallsville  State: MD    Zip: 20839

Phone: 301-607-4025    Email: contactus@monocacyequine.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 13.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 13

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 20

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

Additional explanation:DE2 is a satellite location for horses that cannot be accommodated at DEFHR's main site. All horse-related expenses are included in DEFHR's main facility pages.

17 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 0 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

17 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 4 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

4 = Total of 2d-2f

13 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            13 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$0     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$0     Bedding.

$0     Veterinarian.

$0     Farrier.

$0     Dentist.

$0     Manure Removal.

$0     Medications & Supplements.

$0     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$0     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

*Missing     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

4745     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average length of stay for an equine: 279 days
Question 4 (4745) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (17).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-Some of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time


Program Use of Horses for Special Needs at this Facility Not Applicable.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Brittney Carow

         *Facility Participation:

         Days End Farm Horse Rescue

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Code 3 Associates

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Investigation Academy Levels I, II


     2. *Instructor: DeEtte Gorrie

         *Facility Participation:

         Days End Farm Horse Rescue

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Code 3 Associates and Colorado State University

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2013

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Investigations Academy Level I

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.TLAER

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2013

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue Awareness Course

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Humane Society of United States

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Emergency Sheltering

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. During 2010-2013 DeEtte served as Shelter Manager, Humane Society of Central Illinois, where she managed daily shelter operations including employees, fundraising, budget management, animal intake, temperament and health evaluations, adoption program, health care and veterinary treatment. She was also Director of Licensed Humane Investigators for the state of Illinois, and assisted the States Attorney with animal neglect and cruelty impounds and prosecution cases.


     3. *Instructor: Erin Ochoa

         *Facility Participation:

         Days End Farm Horse Rescue

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.North American Riding for Handicapped Association

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2002

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? No

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Advanced Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.East Coast Control Officer Training and Code 3 Associates Equine Investigators Academy

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2007

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Investigation Academy Levels I, II, III

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Code 3 Associates and Missouri State University

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2010

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Equine Investigation Academy Level II

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Erin Ochoa has been with Days End Farm Horse Rescue (DEFHR) since 2005 and was recently appointed Assistant Executive Director. She has been involved with horses since she was 3 years old, growing up in the U.S. Pony Club and the U.S. Dressage Federation Young Riders. She worked as a veterinary technician for 3 years while attending college and earning a degree in education. Erin also has a background in business, working as a Human Resource Manager and Marketing Director before accepting her current position. Professional Memberships: • Professional Animal Workers (PAWS) • American Horse Council • Maryland Horse Council • Maryland Horse Industry Board • Maryland Association of Nonprofit Organizations


     4. *Instructor: Nicky Wetzelberger

         *Facility Participation:

         Days End Farm Horse Rescue

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Bridgewater College in Bridgewater, VA

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2008

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Bachelors in Communication with a minor in International Studies


     5. *Instructor: Sara Strauss

         *Facility Participation:

         Days End Farm Horse Rescue

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.Kenny Harlow

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2009

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Kenny Harlow provides professional training on starting horses and working with problem horses. His approach focuses on clear communication and patience as the key to solving the most difficult of problems.

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Sara earned her B.S. in Animal Science from the University of Maryland. She came to DEFHR already an accomplished rider and trainer with a background in Dressage and Natural Horsemanship. In early 2009, Sara broadened her experience by completing an apprenticeship with Kenny Harlow. In addition to working with Harlow, Sara has also worked with well-regarded trainers Tara Jones, Scott Purdum, David Beard, Charlie Powers, Craig Cameron, and Julio Mendoza. She continues to interact with these and other experienced trainers to ensure her professional development and the quality of DEFHR’s rehabilitation program.