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Celtic Charms Inc

GUARDIAN PROFILE - Last Updated: 04/30/2017

I. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Staff:

Chief Staff Officer:  William Landuyt

Employees:   Full-Time:  2  Part-Time:  5  Volunteers:  60

Does your organization utilize a management company for management and administration? No

Describe your training process for employees and volunteers and the types of human resource documents used in your organization including job descriptions, evaluations, etc. The following policy is in effect with regard to training:
Volunteers
All volunteers to be given a tour and orientation of the facility. Volunteers will shadow a lesson (lesson to be chosen by volunteer coordinator) as an introduction to our students and to help them and us decide if this volunteer work is a good fit.

Once all relevant paperwork has been completed, volunteers to attend the administration training module, followed by, grooming, tacking, sidewalking, leading modules as appropriate. Volunteers may not work in a particular field until they have had the relevant training.
Volunteers to be sent the volunteer handbook via e-mail on completion of the Admin module.

Staff
During orientation, new hires:
- complete all required paperwork (see below)
- receive relevant staff handbooks, handouts etc
- are given a tour of the facility
- are introduced to all programs offered by Celtic Charms
- are given a review of procedures regarding participants; student notes, files, mounting/dismounting procedures etc.
- receive training in emergency procedures, safety rules and policies

The following human resource documents are used at the start of employment and checked annually thereafter:
Wells Fargo Business Payroll
Confidentiality Statement,
Employment Eligibility Verification, I-9
Employee handbook,
Facility Rules,
First Aid and AED certification
Liability Release Form,
Organizational Chart
PATH Intl. Instructor membership
PATH Intl. Registered Instructor Certificate
Photo Release
Incident Report
Job Description
Letter of Employment
Timesheet
Staff Information
Vehicle Safety
Danielles Law

Governing Body:

Board meetings per year:  5

Number of Board Members:  9  Number of Voting Board Members:  9

Board Compensation:

Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No

Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board Relationships:

Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member. The Executive Director and the Program Director are married, and both are unpaid. They are also the organization's co-founders.

Board Affiliations:

Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? Yes

If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member, and the name of the related organization. The Executive Director and Program Director of Celtic Charms are the sole members of Celtic Charms Equestrian Centers LLC (CCEC), which owns the property at which Celtic Charms Therapeutic Horsemanship (CCTH) conducts its programs. CCEC, which contributes tens of thousands of dollars per year to CCTH to cover all operational expense shortfalls, charges CCTH a nominal amount of $1,000 per month rent.

Conflict of Interest:

Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


II. PROGRAMS

1. What percent of your total programs and services are horse-related? 96

2. Describe your specific horse-related programs services or activities:
     Equine-assisted activities and therapies ("EAAT") including therapeutic horseback riding, horse rescue and rehabilitation (we rescued three of our lesson horses and we continue to consider rescue horses for our program).

3. Enter the total number of facilities/locations where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for: 1

4. Describe your non-horse-related programs, services or activities you provide, including those involving other animals. We rescue farm animals which so far include a cow, a pig, two ducks, and roosters. We also rescued two barn cats, one dog and a green-cheeked conure. These animals serve our students by inspiring communication and engagement (many of our students are non-verbal).

5. Does your organization operate programs involved with animals other than horses?  Yes



III. POLICIES

1. Describe your equine management philosophies, practices, policies and operations with respect to the use of the horses in your program, including the rehabilitation and retraining (if applicable), ongoing training, schooling and exercising plan for each horse and your policy as to the number and condition of the horses accepted by your organization. 
     To date Celtic Charms has been able to rescue one horse and two ponies. We have rehabilitated and retrained all of them for therapeutic riding lessons, and they are now a regular part of our lesson program. Although we are a nonprofit therapeutic riding center, we are receptive to rescuing horses whenever possible within the framework of our primary mission to serve people with disabilities. We currently have 12 horses in our program, and our facility can accommodate a maximum of 16 horses.

Safety is paramount at Celtic Charms, and so our horses and ponies are carefully chosen for their calm attitude, temperament, manners, and adaptability. We select horses that are sound and comfortable without the need for corrective shoes, expensive supplements, or medication. To ensure their continuing suitability, we provide each horse with ongoing training and exercise in a program that is determined by our equine trustee (a professional equestrian and trainer), and Program Director (a PATH Intl-certified advanced instructor and mentor and co-founder of our PATH Intl Premier Accredited Center). As part of this program, our horses are also ridden by experienced riders on and off the premises, including on Celtic Charms trails and occasionally at hunter-pace events. Horses have two days off per week as well as annual time off. Weather permitting, they live out in the pasture 24/7 when they are not being used.

Our horses have a limited number of lessons that are set by the Program Director and reported to the board of trustees monthly. In assigning students to horses, we adhere to strict weight limits for the students (the weight of the student plus tack is no more than 15% of the horse's total weight-we now have to factor in the age of our horses as they are getting older so the % of the horse's total weight is being lowered in some cases.). Additional considerations in matching students to horses include the abilities and limitations of both the horse and the student.

We immediately address any sign of a horse's soreness or discomfort, providing the necessary medical attention and recovery time as well as any required retraining. All of our horses are rotated through a chiropractic treatment program as a preventative measure, and all of our horses are carefully monitored to ensure that they are comfortable, healthy, and fit.

2. Describe how your horses are acquired (adoption, seizure, surrender, donation, purchase, auction sale, retirement). 
     Donation, free lease, purchase, retirement, rescue/auction sale.

3. Describe under what circumstances horses leave your organization. Please describe in detail your horse adoption/fostering practices and procedures including any recruitment initiatives you have to attract potential adopters. Please include your policies and practices with respect to horses that are no longer useful or manageable and horses that need to be retired. 
     In the event that a horse is no longer able to continue its work at Celtic Charms, the following guidelines apply:

1. Free lease
The horse will be returned to its owner.

2. Donation
Every attempt will be made to return the horse to its original owner. Otherwise a suitable new home will be found, starting with the volunteers who would know and have worked with the horse.

3. Sound and healthy
If a horse can no longer be used in the program and is otherwise sound and healthy, a suitable home will be found, starting with the volunteers who would know and have worked with the horse.

4. Unsound but otherwise healthy
A place will be found at a retirement home.

5. Unsound and unhealthy
If the Celtic Charms staff and veterinary service reach the conclusion that the horse is unable to be rehabilitated or retired safely owing to incurable or unmanageable suffering, euthanasia will be performed

4. For new horses, describe your initial assessment process for each horse (i.e. physical examination, test ride, health record, Coggins test, quarantine, veterinary consult, etc.). 
     Initial assessment process includes our Equine Trustee and Program Director and starts with a physical examination, several test rides over the course of 2 weeks at different times of the day, in different types of weather by riders of varying abilities, review of health records and checking the EIA results and date. The horse's reaction is tested by tossing/kicking balls, opening umbrellas, making loud noises. A horse is never accepted into the program without a veterinary consult.

Horses brought on the premises on trial for lease or purchase are quarantined for 30 days and only cleared once vetted by our veterinary service.

5. Describe your overall horse health care plan and how you assess and monitor the health of your horses on an ongoing basis. Include a description of your vaccination and worming schedule. Include a description of your health/veterinary care plan for at-risk animals, geriatric horses and horses with serious issues. 
     All horses:
- have an annual check up by our veterinary service
- receive all necessary spring and autumn vaccinations as determined by our veterinary service
- have individual deworming schedules as determined by the veterinary service through taking fecal egg counts
- are seen by a farrier every 5 to 6 weeks depending on the time of year (hooves grow slower in the winter)
- are seen annually or bi-annually as determined by our dentist.
- are kept outside 24/7 except for lessons and in extreme inclement weather
- are physically checked every morning by our Program Director.
- are on an exercise program as determined by the Equine Trustee and Program Director.
- have two days off per week (Sunday and Monday)
- have time off in the winter and summer
- have a limited number of lessons, which are set by the Program Director, and reported to the board of trustees monthly
- have strict weight limits for their students (the weight of the student plus tack is no more than 15% of the horse's total weight). See 1. above for further information re age.
- are monitored to ensure they get their full ration of hay and grain

Worming:
Horses have individual deworming schedules as determined by our veterinary service through taking fecal egg counts.

Monitoring:
Visual inspections are done throughout each day during feedings, turning in and out, tacking and untacking, exercise, and lessons. All horses are physically checked each morning and evening by the Equine Manager who lives on the premises.

6. What is the euthanasia policy? Please include specifically under what circumstances your organization will euthanize a horse and whether your organization will euthanize a healthy but difficult horse for space: 
     Celtic Charms will only euthanize a horse if advised by our veterinary service to do so to address incurable or unmanageable suffering.

Celtic Charms would NEVER euthanize a healthy horse.

7. What is the breeding policy? Please include specifically if horses become pregnant while in your care, and if there is a no-breeding clause in the documentation your organization uses to adopt, donate, sell, etc. a horse: 
     Celtic Charms does not breed equines. Its initial screening documentation states that it accepts only geldings and non-pregnant mares into its program.

8. Does your organization provide horses to any facility to use in research or medical training? 
     No

9. If your answer to Question 8 is 'Yes', please explain where and for what purpose horses are provided to use in research or medical training? 
     N/A

10. Does your organization sell, donate or give a horse to an auction? 
     No

11. If your answer to Question 10 is 'Yes', describe under the circumstances where you have sold, donated, or given a horse to an auction, or where you would sell, donate, or give a horse to an auction. 
     N/A

12. Does your organization place horses in foster care? 
     No

13. If your answer to Question 12 is 'Yes', describe how foster homes are selected, screened, and monitored and address all the questions below for each foster home in the space provided: 
     N/A

14. What is the average equine adoption fee/donation received by your organization: Not applicable; None received

15. Adoption Fee Policies
  Not applicable; Fees are not collected; Horses are not offered for adoption.

16. What is your position regarding varying adoption fees vs. one set fee:
  Other considerations are provided below.

17. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed: N/A



IV. FACILITIES

This section must be completed for each facility/location where the horses used in the conduct of your horse-related programs are housed and cared for. For example, if the applicant is involved with horse rescue and utilizes foster care facilities, the applicant must complete this section for each foster care facility. If the applicant provides equine assisted activities/services to the public at more than one location, the applicant must complete this section for each location that horse-related services are provided. If your organization uses the facility of another organization, please enlist the aid of that organization in answering the questions.

Total facilities at which our organization operates horse-related programs: 1

.

Location 1 of 1
Celtic Charms Therapeutic Horsemanship

671 Fort Plains Road Howell NJ 07731

1. Facility General Questions

1. Name of Contact: William M. Landuyt

2. Contact's Phone: 732-987-5333

3. Contact's Email: info@celticcharms.org

4. Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

5. If not owned, provide the name, address, phone, email and contact person of the organization(s) and/or individual(s) who owns the facility: Celtic Charms Equestrian Centers LLC
671 Fort Plains Road
Howell, NJ 07731
Tel: 732-987-5333
email: info@celticcharms.org
William M. Landuyt

6. If your organization does not own this facility, does your organization have a written agreement with the owner? Enter Yes or No.   Yes

7. If your organization does not own this facility, please provide the following information below: Start date and end date of current written agreement (term) and what is the organization's plan for the end of the written agreement? 
     The lease was entered into September 15, 2010 between Celtic Charms and Celtic Charms Equestrian Centers LLC (“CCEC”), a New Jersey corporation owned jointly by William and Christine Landuyt, the Executive Director and Equine Manager (respectively) of Celtic Charms. The term of the lease runs as long as CCEC owns the property. In the event that CCEC were to no longer own the property, subject to Board of Trustees approval, Celtic Charms would endeavor to negotiate a new lease with the successor owner(s).

8. If your organization leases or uses a part of this facility, please provide the details as to what services are provided by the owner and if and how the owner is compensated.. 
     The owner is responsible for all capital improvements, alterations or additions, property taxes and the provision of utilities which are paid by Celtic Charm . A nominal $1,000 per month is charged as rent.

9. Does your organization operate programs involving horses AT THIS FACILITY that serve individuals with special needs, including but not limited to equine assisted activities and therapies? Yes

10. Enter the total number of instructors/trainers (full-time and part-time) involved with your organization's horse-related programs at this facility: 6.


2. Facility Horse-Related Questions

1. Enter the total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 15

2. Describe the number and type of pastures and paddocks, fencing, enclosures, stabling including barns and run-in sheds. Celtic Charms’ property includes seven fenced paddocks, four with run-in sheds and three with stalls. Every paddock is gated and has a three-rail wooden fence. Fences and gates are scanned daily by staff and volunteers. Each of our paddocks includes a dedicated water trough, which is heated during the winter. The perimeter of the farm that runs along the public road has a double fence, one wooden three-rail and one reinforced PVC three-rail fence. Our main barn includes 16 secure stalls plus two tack stalls, a feed room and a wash stall. Larger stalls measure 11.5 feet x 11.5 feet and regular stalls measure 11.5 feet x 10.5 feet. There is another ten-stall barn on the property that is used to store hay, tools and equipment; it also includes one stall that used as a quarantine area when necessary.

3. Describe how you manage the use of your pastures/paddocks given the size and number of your pastures/paddocks and the number of horses you have at this facility.
     Equines are separated into suitable groupings (i.e. mares, ponies, geldings, shod vs. unshod, etc.) and temperaments within paddocks. Equines are rotated among paddocks periodically as the grazing profile changes, and periodically a paddock is taken out of use for grass replenishment

4. How many hours of daily turnout do the horses get? (Estimate or Average) 23

5. Describe the area where your training, riding and equine related activities are conducted, including what type of footing/surface is utilized and what factors were considered to determine the suitability and condition of the area for the activities conducted.
     Celtic Charms has one indoor arena measuring 80 feet by 200 feet with a sand and rubber pellet combination footing surface. In 2016 the old footing was 100% replaced with new sand and rubber pellet combination footing. The indoor includes three accesses to the outside and two accesses to the barn stabling area. It is well-lit with windows providing natural light on three sides and light fixtures. The indoor arena is groomed (raked) each morning lessons are scheduled and watered weekly to keep down dust. In addition, Celtic Charms has one fenced outdoor arena with sand footing that measures 175 feet by 330 feet and outdoor lighting. The outdoor arena is groomed (raked weekly or sooner if needed.) Lessons and training are done in both arenas as dictated by weather and the number of lessons occurring at any particular day and time. As appropriate for students and weather conditions, lessons may also include trail rides on the property's well-groomed wooded trails.

6. Is the facility in compliance with the Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities prepared by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (whether or not your organization is directly involved with rescue and retirement)? Yes

7. If no, please explain and specifically describe the areas in which the facility is not compliant. Not Applicable

8. If this facility is recognized as compliant with the published standards of another applicable organization, and/or accredited by another applicable organization, including any state licensure or registration process, please provide the details.
     Celtic Charms is a PATH International PREMIER Accredited Center. It received a 100% pass score at its 2013 accreditation.

9. Describe the availability/accessibility of emergency horse transportation at this facility.
     Celtic Charms has one 5-Star 4-horse trailer and one 2-horse trailer permanently on the premises.

10. Do the horses have specific tack assignments? Yes

11. Describe the plan, process and/or procedures to insure appropriate assessment of tack and the use for saddle fittings, tack, blankets, etc.
     All horses have their own bridles and saddles, which are fitted when purchased and 1. checked annually by our veterinary service and 2. checked monthly by the Program Director. All saddles, girths, bridles, saddle pads, halters etc. are fitted by the Program Director and charts are attached to the tack room to ensure correct fitting. All blankets, rain sheets etc. are fitted by the Program Director, removed daily and monitored weekly to ensure fit.

12. Describe the system used by your organization to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property.
     All stalls and tack are labeled with the name of the horse to which they are assigned. All horses wear halters with name tags when they are not under saddle. There is a white board in the main aisle of the barn showing which horse belongs in which paddock.

13. Describe your housing plan and the turnout process/plan for horses normally stall bound.
     All horses have a stall in the main barn, but horses are turned out in paddocks 24/7 except during extreme weather or when they are used in lessons. During extreme weather horses are rotated through the indoor arena for exercise and social interaction throughout the day.

14. Describe your feed, feed management plan and your guidelines for the use of supplements.
     Only high quality feed is fed to our equines. Our hay has been tested and is of good quality. After taking into consideration the feed each horse receives prior to arriving at Celtic Charms, our veterinary service is consulted during the initial evaluation as to the on-going requirements of each equine and is consulted again at each equine’s annual check up. A feed chart for all equines is kept on a whiteboard in the feed room. Each day the Program Director runs her hands over the horse’s ribs and body to assess their score. If the horse needs to gain weight, hay is increased first followed by an increase horse's grain ration. If a horse needs to lose weight, the grain is decreased first followed by a reduction in hay. The Equine Trustee also monitors the horses and adjustments recommended to the Program Director. Supplements are only used if recommended by our veterinary service.

15. How do you use the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to guide you in your hennekeing/exercising/use practices for each horse?
     Our veterinary service uses the Henneke Body Conditioning Score to assess each horse at the its annual check up. Feed and hay is adjusted accordingly. At the first equine check each morning, the Program Director runs her hands over the horse’s ribs and body to assess its score. Hay and feed are adjusted accordingly.

16. Please describe your activities to limit or control the advent and spread of disease within your facility (Biosecurity plan). This should include but is not limited to your manure management and disposal procedures, your carcass disposal plan and your parasite control plan. Please indicate the role of your veterinarian in the development and implementation of your overall plan.
     Manure is picked from the paddocks at least 6-7 days/week and from stalls throughout the day. Manure is initially deposited in a composting area. The compost area is concrete-floored with a paved apron and comprises four bins which are used to store and turn manure and bedding material on a rotating basis. Our manure management plan is based on an independently developed Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plan (“CNMP”) which was completed and submitted to the Department of Agriculture – Freehold, NJ in the spring of 2013. It includes: • A schedule for spreading composted manure/bedding materials semi-annually based on soil nutrient levels • Off-site disposal from a hauler (Freehold Cartage) as needed ----------------------------------------- Carcass Disposal – an external disposal service recommended by our veterinary service is used. Parasite Control – All equines are on a selective deworming program using fecal egg count; program is determined and administered by veterinarian. Paddocks are picked 6-7x/week and manure placed in a compost bin. Fly predators are used from Spring to Fall to control flies. ----------------------------------------- Quarantine Policy - Horses brought on premises on trial for lease or purchase are quarantined from the existing equine population for 30 days and only added to the equine herd upon clearance from our veterinary service.

17. Please describe your emergency preparedness plans that address weather related issues, fire safety procedures and/or any additional hazardous scenarios your facility could potentially experience.
     Written procedures and diagrams relating to fire and other emergencies are posted at various locations throughout the barn, indoor arena, waiting area and office area. Fire extinguishers are located at various locations within the main barn, storage barn, indoor arena, waiting area and office area as per local fire code recommendations and include posted written instructions on operating them. Fire extinguishers are checked monthly, and local fire department annually checks barn and fire extinguishers.“Fire drills” are held annually. The farm has a strict “No Smoking” policy and barn policies are prominently posted within the facility. All staff and volunteers are briefed on emergency procedures for fire or incidents. Instructors are trained and certified in First Aid and CPR. There are separate dedicated First Aid cabinets for humans and equines, and there are separate dedicated portable First Aid bags for humans and equines for use offsite. All cabinets and bags are checked monthly. On-site wells potable and non-potable water are connected to a back-up natural gas-fired generator which has an automatic weekly testing protocol and is serviced semi-annually. A portable generator is on-site at the barn and can be connected to a separate panel to provide emergency lighting and computer power. It is tested and run at least quarterly. Celtic Charms has a reciprocal agreement with a barn in another township to relocate its equines in the event of catastrophe.

18. Please describe the security in place at the facility or facilities to restrict public access and to keep horses safe. Do you have a security system and/or on-premises caretaker?
     The facility is fully fenced and gated from the outside and is secured nightly. The Executive Director and Program Director's residence is on-site and includes a security and alarm system. Access to the facility from the road runs past their residence. Safety lighting is incorporated at the entrance to the barn to provide visibility from the road.

19. Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Health PO Box 330 Trenton, NJ 08625 609-671-6400 Manoel.tamassia@ag.state.nj.us

20. Other than the animal control authority noted above, provide the contact information for all local, state and/or national authorities with whom your organization engages to address issues impacting horse welfare, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     .


Veterinarian Information

View The Vet Checklist conducted on 04/17/2017

Veterinarian: Dr. Elden Klayman

Clinic Name: Colts Head Veterinary Services    Street: 15 Hidden Pines Drive    City: Clarksburg  State: NJ    Zip: 07731

Phone: 732-780-7563    Email: myhorsevet@aol.com


Instructors assigned to this Facility
(see Instructor Section)

     1. Instructor: Beth Donoghue

     2. Instructor: Christie Kerr

     3. Instructor: Christine Landuyt

     4. Instructor: Dolores Cutler

     5. Instructor: Wende Pickens

     6. Instructor: William Landuyt


3. Facility Horse-Related Inventory Questions

1-a. Enter the total number of horses involved with your organization's programs that are currently housed at this facility: 12.

1-b. Enter the total number of horses housed at this facility: 13

1-c. Enter the maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 16

2016 Horse Inventory

1-d. Did your organization operate programs involving horses HOUSED AT THIS FACILITY during January 1-December 31, 2016? Please select Yes or No. Yes

14 2-a. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on January 1, 2016.

           + 1 2-b. Total number of intakes other than returns including donated, purchased, surrendered or rescued.

           + 0 2-c. Total number of horses returned.

15 = Total of 2a-2c

           - 0 2-d. Total number of horses adopted during the year.

           - 2 2-e. Total number of horses transferred to another facility during the year.

           - 0 2-f. Total number of horses deceased during the year.

2 = Total of 2d-2f

13 2-g. Total number of horses housed at this facility involved with your programs on December 31, 2016.

            13 2-h. Total number of horses not retired including horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.

            0 2-i. Total number of horses permanently retired.


2016 Horse Care Costs

$21500     Feed (Grain/Hay).

$2100     Bedding.

$11000     Veterinarian.

$5900     Farrier.

$1000     Dentist.

$3000     Manure Removal.

$3500     Medications & Supplements.

$7500     Horse/Barn Supplies.

$39700     Horse Care Staff.

$0     Horse Training.

$11600     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.

$106800     2016 Total Horse Care Costs

$     2016 Total Donated Horse Care Costs

5110     Grand total of the total number of days each equine was in the care of this facility during 2016.

Average cost per day per horse: $21
Question 3 ($106,800 ) divided by Question 4 (5110).

Average length of stay for an equine: 341 days
Question 4 (5110) divided by total of Questions 2a-c (15).


4. Self Assessment

I. Facility & Grounds
A.Operational

     1. Signage: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     2. Lighting: Are rules, restrictions and warnings posted in or near appropriate areas? All of the time

     3. Emergency Contacts: Are emergency contacts posted in easily accessible locations for staff members if only cell phones are available or by each phone if landlines are available? All of the time

      4. First Aid Kits: Are human and equine first aid kits up-to-date and easily accessible? All of the time

B. Structural

      1. Condition of surface: Are horses provided a clean, dry area on which to stand & lay? All of the time

      2. Flooring - drainage & traction: Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction? All of the time

      3. Ventilation for enclosed shelters: Is there adequate ventilation and circulation to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases? All of the time

      4. Electrical wiring condition: Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety? All of the time

      5. Fire Prevention & protective measures: Are fire prevention and protection measures including fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems, maintained and in good working order? All of the time

      6. Quarantine/Isolation: Is there a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine? Yes

      7. Ill/injured containment: If horses live outside, is there a designated and separate area (stall or enclosure) to house ill/injured horses? Yes

      8. Are the horses housed in stalls/enclosures? Yes-All of the time

      8-a. If yes, Stall/enclosure size: Do structures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around? All

      8-b. If yes, Stall/enclosure cleanliness: How often are stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 days a week

      8-c. If yes, Adequate ceiling & beam height: Is there a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear when standing? All of the time

C. Paddocks/Yard/Pastures/Turnout

      1. Turnout/Exercise Space & opportunity: Is there space and opportunity for horses to exercise or be turned out? All of the time

      2. Fencing - type, height, safety: Are these spaces appropriately fenced? All

      3. Use of electric wire or tape fence: Are electric wires or tape fence visibly marked? Please select 'All or NA' if electric wire or tape fence is not used. All or NA

      4. Condition of fences & gates: Are fences and gates functioning properly by being maintained and repaired when needed? All

      5. Condition of paddock/yard: Are these spaces free from equipment and debris? All

      6. Availability of shelter: Are natural or man-made shelters available to horses for protections from elements? All of the time

      7. Cleanliness: How often are these spaces cleaned? Daily or 6 Days a Week

II. Horse Care

      1. Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 1-2 months

      2. Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually

      3. Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually

      4. Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? 6-7 days a week

      5. Food & Water Storage: Are all hay, feed, grain and water sources clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals? All of the time

      6. Drinking water: How often do horses have access to clean drinking water? All of the time



6. Public-Related Questions
(required if programs serve individuals with special needs)

1. How many clients participate in the programs at this facility? 75

2. How many hours per week do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 60

3. How many weeks per year do you operate the horse-related programs at this facility? 48

4. What is the average wait list time? 3 Months(Weeks/Months/Years)

5. How many hours per day does each horse work? (Estimate or Average)

    Mounted: 10.00  Un-Mounted: 0.00  Total: 10

6. How many days per week does each horse work? (Estimate or Average) 5

7. What percent of your programs and services at this facility are mounted (vs. ground-based)? 100%

8. Provide any additional explanation to your answers if needed.


V. Instructors/Trainers


     1. *Instructor: Beth Donoghue

         *Facility Participation:

         Celtic Charms Therapeutic Horsemanship

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     2. *Instructor: Christie Kerr

         *Facility Participation:

         Celtic Charms Therapeutic Horsemanship

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2016

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     3. *Instructor: Christine Landuyt

         *Facility Participation:

         Celtic Charms Therapeutic Horsemanship

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International thru Centenary College

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Advanced Therapeutic Riding Instructor

Certification 2:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2007

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor

Certification 3:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2008

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.PATH International Mentor

Please use the space below to share any additional information about this instructor. Christine Landuyt is the Program Director and a co-founder of Celtic Charms Therapeutic Horsemanship


     4. *Instructor: Dolores Cutler

         *Facility Participation:

         Celtic Charms Therapeutic Horsemanship

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2011

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     5. *Instructor: Wende Pickens

         *Facility Participation:

         Celtic Charms Therapeutic Horsemanship

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2012

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor


     6. *Instructor: William Landuyt

         *Facility Participation:

         Celtic Charms Therapeutic Horsemanship

Is the instructor certified by an organization that provides training in the programs, activities and/or services conducted by the organization? Yes

Certification 1:

Provide the name of the certifying organization.PATH International

Enter the year that the certification was awarded. (yyyy)2015

Is the instructor's certification considered 'active' by the certifying organization? Yes

Briefly describe the nature/level of the certification.Registered Therapeutic Riding Instructor