EQUINE WELFARE NETWORK PROFILE
Mini Therapy Horses



Mini Therapy Horses
26500 Agoura Road Suite 102-460
Calabasas, CA 91302

Phone: 818-917-0214  MAKE AN INQUIRY

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EIN: 47-1664974
Founded: 2008
Profile Last Updated March 30, 2022

Public Charity



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Equine Welfare Network Guardian
AWARDED ANNUALLY
Effective Date
May 2022

The Guardian Seal of Transparency is awarded annually to recognize an organization's commitment to transparency and accountability by their willingness to make comprehensive data about their programs, horse care practices, and governance available for public scrutiny. The Guardian Seal of Transparency is NOT an endorsement.
Awarded Annually
Effective Date: May 2022
Last Updated: May 22, 2022

MISSION & PROGRAMS

Mission:
Founded in 2008 by Victoria Nodiff-Netanel, Mini Therapy Horses works closely with hospitals, facilities and other organizations across Los Angeles to provide equine assisted therapy/equine assisted activity (EAT/EAA) to those who need it most. Whether comforting children bedside after surgery as they come out of anesthesia or visiting with a veteran who just wants to sit quietly and share space with one of our horses, the MTH team is there to bring a sense of calm, comfort and happiness. MTH exists to bring joy, comfort and hope to those who need it most.

Our organization conducts Equine Assisted Services in accordance with the EQUUS Foundation Guidelines on Qualifications of Organizations Conducting Equine Assisted Services (EAS).
Our organization provides community outreach and/or public education programs involving horses.
Our organization is directly responsible for the care and shelter of equines involved in our programs.
100% of our total programs and services are horse-related.
Our organization does not use satellite, overflow, foster, and/or outreach facilities
Number of facilities/locations where horses used in our programs are HOUSED AND CARED FOR or were HOUSED AND CARED FOR during 2021: 1
     1. MTH Ranch (*Main) Status: 2022 and 2021

Summary of organization's goals, strategies to achieve the goals, accomplishments, and capabilities to meet the goals, including its long-term plans to sustain its programs:
The mission of Mini Therapy Horses is a simple one: to bring joy and comfort to those who need it most. Our team of mini therapy horses has touched the lives of tens of thousands of people through our unique form of equine therapy. From veterans to pediatric hospital patients, to students and the elderly, everyone can benefit from the hope, healing and special connection our horses provide.
     
     We are proud to make regular visits to the UCLA Ronald Reagan and Santa Monica Medical Centers, Shriners Children’s Southern California, the Greater Los Angeles Veterans' Hospital, the Los Angeles Department of Children and Family Services Juvenile Court, Ronald McDonald House Charities and the Veterans Home of California - West Los Angeles. We are also honored to visit local schools, homeless centers, libraries, assisted living facilities and rehab facilities to name a few. As members of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Crisis Response Team (CRT), our horses are on-call 24/7 to provide immediate and follow up support during traumatic events like the mass shooting in Thousand Oaks or the wildfires. Our CRT work has recently grown to also include visits to 911 dispatchers at multiple LAPD 911 Call Centers.
     
     Mini Therapy Horses is honored to be a Guidestar Platinum certified organization. MTH has proudly participated in the Rose Parade® in 2016, 2018, 2019, 2020 and 2022. Our award winning program has been featured in numerous publications and television shows, including The Kelly Clarkson Show, California Live, People Magazine and National Geographic's, This Book Is Cute: The Soft and Squishy Science and Culture of Awe.
     
     To understand the impact of our work, one needs to look no further than a recent interaction we had at Shriners Children’s Southern California. During this visit, we were asked by the staff if we could help comfort a patient while he was being fit for an orthopedic device for his hand. Typically, this procedure can be somewhat painful and, for some children, even traumatic. Knowing she had work to do, our sweet mini horse, Louise, snuggled right up to the patient. He placed his right hand on her mane as the staff began the painful fitting process on his left hand. During the procedure, the child stayed wholly focused on Louise, petting her soft coat and never once taking his eyes off of her. Before he knew it, the procedure was over and he was smiling and laughing. Louise’s comforting presence and kind eyes were all the distraction necessary to get him through that challenge. Sometimes watching our mini girls work feels like watching a miracle happen.
     
     Our longest-running program at Mini Therapy Horses is our partnership with the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. Since 2009, we have been making weekly visits to the West LA Medical Center and reach approximately 600 veterans each month. Perhaps one of our most profound and humbling encounters there is when we received a Last Wish request from a terminal patient named Jerry. He requested to see our therapy horse, Pearl, whom he had met during one of our many visits to the VA. Pearl had touched his heart because as a child, he had been taken in by a family in Germany. This family lived on a farm and his fondest memories were of the horses he connected with there. On this final visit, Jerry talked to and gently petted Pearl as he went in and out of consciousness. They were communicating in their own beautiful language and Pearl knew exactly what he needed in that moment. Jerry passed peacefully a few days after our visit and we were so honored that Pearl was able to help guide him on his journey home.
     
     Throughout the pandemic, we were so grateful to be able to continue our life-changing work via virtual visits. Our horses motivated children during their physical therapy sessions at Shriners via Zoom visits. For example, a child would roll a ball towards the computer screen and reach out, as directed, to touch the horse’s nose/muzzle. This exercise helped strengthen the muscles in her back and improve her balance. We also connected with healthcare workers and other first responders, helping them de-stress and cope as the pandemic ravaged our nation. Spending a few moments with our horses, even virtually, provided these hard-working folks a much-needed break and gave them a dose of joy in an otherwise dark time. We were also there for students, teachers and families as they navigated distance-learning, helping them find the fun in this “new normal.” Whatever the situation, whoever it was, MTH is always there to bring comfort and hope.
     
     Our goal is to continue to make a difference in the peoples' lives through positive human-equine interactions. The effects of the pandemic have been felt far and wide and we have been inundated with visit requests from all corners of the community: first-responders, schools, rehab facilities, hospitals, veteran support programs, individual families and everything in between. Right now, it seems as if everyone is in need of the special hope and healing our mini therapy horses can provide. Fortunately, we anticipated this need and during the past two years we have worked to ensure our organization is equipped and ready to handle this influx of requests. We have two customized Sprinter vans that allow us to safely and efficiently transport our horses to visits. The hiring of a full-time barn manager in 2020 has enabled Victoria, our president/executive director, to focus more on visits, program development and training new volunteers. Last year, we also added a part-time admin position to the team. This person takes care of scheduling, tracking finances, PR and our web presence, further freeing up Victoria to focus her efforts less in the office and more out in the field where it really makes a difference. All of these elements coming together has set us up for success and 2022 is shaping up to be our biggest year yet. As with so many other non-profits, unfortunately, our fundraising efforts were severely hindered by the pandemic. Our goal to reach more people than ever will only be possible if we continue to cultivate and grow our donor base. As such, we remain focused on maintaining a stellar reputation, which of course includes our Guardian designation, continuing to do great work out in our communities and being the reliable beacon of hope for which MTH is known.

Equine Assisted Services (EAS):
Our organization provides the following equine assisted services (EAS):
    Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)
    Equine-Assisted Occupational Therapy/Physical Therapy/Speech-Language Pathology
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Academic Learning
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development
Not Checked:
    Therapeutic Mounted Services
    Therapeutic Driving Services
    Therapeutic Vaulting Services
    Therapeutic Unmounted Services


Overview of our programs involved with providing EAS to individuals with special needs:
     Mini Therapy Horses conducts regular visits at Shriners for Children Medical Center in Pasadena, Ronald McDonald House in both Pasadena and Los Angeles, the Department of Children and Family Services Juvenile Court, UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center, UCLA Santa Monica Hospital, the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Hospital and L.A. Family Housing, amongst others.
     
     We have created a set of training and safety standards that far exceed those of traditional animal assisted therapy organizations. All of our horses are trained with safety in mind. They are able to go up/down stairs, ride in elevators, are desensitized to all surroundings they might encounter on any given visit and are potty trained. Under the steady lead of their handlers, our horses are able to safely navigate their environment, whether it’s maneuvering around delicate medical equipment at a patient's bedside or standing carefully next to a wheelchair. In addition to basic commands, our horses are also trained to do tricks. They smile, give high fives, play the keyboard and, the biggest crowd pleaser of them all, perform “Hi Ho Silver,” where they stand up on their hind legs. When we teach the patients how to do these commands using their voice or a hand motion, the tricks serve as a tool that connects them to the horse. Engaging in this activity helps the patient instantly feel more confident, accomplished and bonded.
     
     Every year, our teams of highly trained miniature therapy horses and volunteers provide equine assisted therapy to thousands of children and adults who are in need of hope and healing. Some days we visit with individuals undergoing medical procedures. Other days we visit with veterans who suffer from PTSD. There are times when we’re with people overcoming substance abuse and then sometimes we are there for those suffering from emotional trauma following a mass casualty event. No matter the day, no matter the need, Mini Therapy Horses is ready and willing to be there for those who need us most.
     
     Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)
     Populations served:
     
     1) Greater Los Angeles Veteran’s Hospital: MTH assists the Certified Mental Health Rehabilitation Specialist during therapy with patients in the lockdown psychiatric unit. The equine interaction promotes more social interaction which aids in alleviating depression, increasing focus, and navigating group settings. These interactions are focused on having physical contact with the horse. It is very therapeutic for patients who are isolated and depressed. It brings them joy and a sense of relief. Often, they open up and reflect on childhood memories about their own experiences of being close to an animal. The horse is the vehicle of the physical interaction and discussion. The doctors and advocates say that patient interactions with the horses have given them a way to break the ice with patients. Discussing the miniature horses gives them a window into patients who are unresponsive.
     
     2) Cliffside Malibu Residential Rehabilitation Program: MTH assists LMFT’s and LVN’s by providing Equine-assisted Psychotherapy and Counseling to clients undergoing treatment for alcohol or drug addiction.
     
     3) Area Universities, Colleges, and Pre-K-12 Schools: MTH works with school counselors, teachers, and psychologists to help students during times of stress- from finals to traumatic events such as the loss of a teacher in the 2017 Las Vegas Shooting and the loss of homes in the 2018 Woolsey Fire. Working with counselors, students are able to open up and process their loss and sadness. We have ongoing programs with UCLA and USC. The simple act of petting a miniature horse releases an automatic relaxation response. Research in animal assisted therapy supports what we have witnessed with our Mini Therapy Horses: that they help lower anxiety, reduce loneliness, increase mental stimulation, provide a happy distraction, and reduce the initial resistance that might accompany therapy.
     
     4) LA Mayor’s Crisis Response Team: Members of MTH have completed intensive training to become certified Crisis Response Team Members. MTH is on call 24 hours a day to respond to traumatic events in the City of Los Angeles. Effective on-scene compassion and support utilizing our Miniature Horses help “contain” the impact of the traumatic event, such as car accidents, suicides, infant deaths, and homicides. MTH provides follow up visits as well to support survivors. This in turn helps survivors begin a path to rebuilding healthy, fulfilling, productive lives, rather than down a path to despair, substance abuse, school failure, job loss, family breakup, and other problems.
     
     
     5) Shriner’s for Children’s Medical Center: MTH works with medical staff utilizing EAS to decrease patient anxiety and fear before and after procedures and clinic visits.
     
     6) UCLA Health Care System: MTH partners with the UCLA People Animal Connection to provide EAS to patients, Staff, and visitors at the UCLA Medical Centers. Our horses provide positive interaction, comfort, and relief.
     
     7) Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services Juvenile Court: MTH works with Social Workers and Child Life Specialists to provide EAS to high-risk children before and after they appear in Juvenile Court to testify against their abusers. Double leash walking, hugging, petting, brushing, and playing games like soccer with the horses or holding a keyboard that the horses play are just some of the interventions used. Our horses bring comfort and hope to these children that are so in need.
     
     8) Veterans Home of California - West Los Angeles: MTH works with staff to provide EAS to the residents, most of whom are elderly and suffer from a variety of medical issues, including physical limitations, PTSD and dementia. Our horses help patients feel less isolated, more social and provide a sense of calm and peace.
     
     Equine-Assisted Occupational Therapy/Physical Therapy/Speech-Language Pathology
     Populations served:
     
     1) Ronald McDonald Houses: MTH works with Child Life Specialists to provide EAS to children undergoing treatment for cancer and other life-threatening illnesses.
     
     2) Shriner’s for Children’s Medical Center in Pasadena: MTH works with OT and PT caring for children who are undergoing complicated medical procedures including surgeries and treatment for scoliosis and limb prothesis. Therapists incorporate the miniature horses into specific exercises to meet individual patient’s therapeutic goals. Even via Zoom the horses motivate the children to participate in their therapy. For example, a child rolls on a ball towards the computer screen where she reaches out as directed to touch the horse’s nose/muzzle. This exercise helps strengthen the muscles in her back and improves her balance.
     
     Interacting with our Miniature Horses is a great motivator for children who are reluctant or shy to participate in therapy. We have small brushes that fit perfectly in a child’s hand; the act of brushing a horse is excellent occupational therapy. We work with double leash walking, where a horse-handler and the child jointly walk one of the horses. The child, with their walker or in their wheelchair, hold one of the leads and the handler has the other, ensuring safety and control with the horse. This simple act reaps huge benefits. The children feel empowered, confident, and proud all while having fun in a way that distracts them from their current situation.
     
     EQUINE ASSISTED LEARNING SERVICES
     Equine Assisted Learning services encompass:
      Academic Learning
      Self-improvement, Wellness, Team Building, and/or Personal or Professional Coaching
     
     Population served:
     
     1) Area Universities, Colleges, and Pre-K-12 Schools, Greater Los Angeles Veterans’ Hospital, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Shriners’ for Children’s Medical Center: MTH works with medical staff (physicians, nurses, ancillary staff) and educators in our local schools to provide support, team building, and de-stressor events.
     
     2) Library Program: MTH works with several librarians in the LA Public library system as well as teachers in our local public schools as part of their literacy program providing Equine Assisted Learning. Our Miniature Horses involvement creates a special and magical event for parents and children which in turn creates important positive memories about reading and libraries, thereby inspiring children to read. We also talk about the importance of volunteering and caring for others in our community and how our horses make a difference in people’s lives.


At a time when equestrian sports are under pressure to protect horses while making those sports more accessible, so too must all equine organizations ensure that horses are treated humanely when interacting with people with and without special needs. Our organization takes the following steps to ensure that horses are benefiting from their interactions with people:
     At MTH, we believe that positive human-equine interactions start at home. Keeping our horses happy and healthy is paramount. Every aspect of the care of each horse is meticulously managed. Individual diets, daily grooming, daily exercise and veterinary care are all closely monitored and each horse is given a great deal of individual attention. This ensures that our horses are not only fit and healthy, but that they also feel safe and social.
     
     Our training focuses on fostering positive, caring interactions between our volunteers and horses. Creating a bond of trust and respect between the handler and horse is crucial. All of our handlers are extensively trained to be in tune with the horse and to listen/watch for subtle cues when the horse may need a break from an interaction. Our training also involves routinely exposing our horses to a variety of new stimuli in a supportive, reassuring manner so when on visits with the public they feel safe and confident.
     
     Along with our incredible team, our state of the art facility creates a nurturing and supportive environment so our horses are happy, willing and loving. There is a sense of calm at our facility and our horses are always curious, playful and content.
     
     Having created a solid foundation at home, our horses are then able to go out in public confidently and focus on doing what they do best: bringing joy and comfort to everyone they meet. We like to employ the “buddy system” during visits, wherein a handler is accompanied by another volunteer. This system allows the handler to focus on the horse and the person with whom we are interacting, while the other volunteer handles crowd control (if necessary), answers questions and assists the handler however needed. At all times, both people are constantly assessing each situation and making sure the horse remains safe and comfortable. Having two sets of eyes and hands at the visits makes for a fun and safe experience for all. Our volunteers are also trained on how to gently and lovingly “coach” the public on how to safely interact with our horses i.e. showing them where to stand, where the horse likes to be touched, etc. This keeps the horses feeling safe and secure and ensures the public have a positive experience too. During our visits, we are also sure to provide scheduled breaks for our horses. These breaks are important as they give the horses an opportunity to potty and also enjoy some time away from stimulation. We are also careful to rotate which horses go out on visits and each horse is given “time off” between visits to keep them fresh and willing. All of these elements combined create positive experiences for the horses and, as a result, for all the humans involved as well.


Community Outreach and/or Public Education:
Overview of our programs involved with providing community outreach and/or public education programs involving horses:
     At Mini Therapy Horses, community outreach is at the core of our work. Promoting and advancing the equine-human connection is what we are all about and with each visit we witness first-hand how powerful and healing this connection can be. Because our highly trained horses are so small, we can take them to many different places, including hospitals and other indoor settings. This allows us to reach thousands of people each year, many of whom have never experienced the beauty and wonder of a horse up-close. Additionally, because of their small size, our horses are much less intimidating than a regular-sized horse. This immediately puts people at ease and creates a more welcoming environment, especially for children and those who have not been around horses. The pure delight we see in people at these visits is immeasurable. Our horses are beautifully groomed and love to pose for photos with people. They also do a number of “tricks” that not only entertain, but show the public how intelligent these little horses are. And, of course, there are always plenty of mini horse hugs to go around! Seeing a child’s face light up when they wrap their arms around one of our horses and give them a hug is pure magic.
     
     In addition to our regularly scheduled visits at the aforementioned hospitals and other facilities, we also participate in a variety of community events throughout the year. This includes Fleet Week, veteran appreciation events, community preparedness events, orphanage outreach and speaking engagements at local schools and libraries. One of the highlights of the year is marching in the world famous Rose Parade, which we have done five times (and counting!) Being able to share our mission with 700,000 people live and tens of millions watching around the world is such an honor and we are humbled by how welcome we are always made to feel.
     
     Advocating for horses and teaching others about the special nature of horses is a natural part of our work because we truly believe they have the power to change lives. As you can imagine, whenever we are out in public, whether it’s on a visit to a hospital or simply strolling the neighborhood on a training walk, we are constantly stopped and asked questions about the minis. We get so excited when people show an interest in the horses and love educating others about these special little creatures. Being ambassadors, not just for minis, but for all horses, is a responsibility we welcome and we hope to inspire others when they see the compassion and joy our horses bring.

Research/Medical Use of Equines:
Our organization has never made, and would not ever consider making, equines available for research studies or medical training that involves invasive procedures and/or that which may cause pain or suffering to the equine. 

Religious Affiliation:
Our organization does not promote religious education, religious purposes, or a specific religious faith or use donations for religious education or religious purposes; require participants to be of a certain faith; require participation in religious, instruction, activities or services; or require participation in prayer, worship, religious instruction or other religious activities as a condition of receiving social or secular services offered. 

Auction Donation:
Our organization has never allowed, or would not consider allowing, an equine to be sold, transferred, released, or otherwise placed into possession of any person or organization that would cause or allow the equine to be sold at auction for slaughter. 

EQUINE ASSISTED SERVICES CENSUS

MTH Ranch
Current EAS Providers: 11
         
2021 EAS Operations Mounted Only Unmounted Only Both Mounted & Unmounted Total
Horses/Equines participating in EAS programs at this facility        
Number of horses/equines aged 3-8 0 6 0 6
Number of horses/equines aged 9-14 0 3 0 3
Number of horses/equines aged 15-20 0 0 0
Number of horses/equines Over 20 0 0 0 0
Total number of horses/equines participating in EAS programs at this facility 0 9 0 9
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Number of hours per day each horse works 0 2  
Number of days per week each horse works 0 2  
         
Clients participating in EAS programs at this facility Mounted Only Unmounted Only Both Mounted & Unmounted Total
Total number of individual clients (not lessons) served annually 0 9999 0 9999
Average number of clients (not lessons) participating in activities per week 0 550 0 550
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Number of days per week programs are conducted at this facility 0 4  
Number of weeks per year programs are conducted at this facility 0 50  
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Average wait list time for a client 2 Weeks  
         

Additional explanation: Currently at MTH we have ten mini horses. At this time, only nine are active in EAS operations because one horse is only 2-years-old and still in training. Regarding total number of individual clients served annually, we average approximately 27,500 individuals. We are unable to log this number in the column as the max amount allowed is 9999, so that is what we indicated.


EQUINE ASSISTED SERVICE PROVIDERS


Equine Assisted Services (EAS):
Our organization provides the following Equine Assisted Services (EAS):
    Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)
    Equine-Assisted Occupational Therapy/Physical Therapy/Speech-Language Pathology
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Academic Learning
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development

11: Total number of Equine Assisted Service Providers at MTH Ranch

     1. Area Pre-K-12 Schools, Colleges and Universities

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         MTH Ranch

         RELATIONSHIP: Accompany Clients

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)

         Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Mini Therapy Horses works with multiple service providers. All are licensed, certified and/or credentialed as per national and local health and human service requirements.


     2. Cliffside Malibu Residential Rehabilitation Program

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         MTH Ranch

         RELATIONSHIP: Accompany Clients

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Mini Therapy Horses works with multiple service providers. All are licensed, certified and/or credentialed as per national and local health and human service requirements.


     3. Greater Los Angeles Public Library System

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         MTH Ranch

         RELATIONSHIP: Accompany Clients

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Learning involving Academic Learning

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Mini Therapy Horses works with multiple service providers. All are licensed, certified and/or credentialed as per national and local health and human service requirements.


     4. LA County Dept of Children & Family Services Juvenile Court

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         MTH Ranch

         RELATIONSHIP: Accompany Clients

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Mini Therapy Horses works with multiple service providers. All are licensed, certified and/or credentialed as per national and local health and human service requirements.


     5. Los Angeles Mayor's Crisis Response Team

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         MTH Ranch

         RELATIONSHIP: Volunteer

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Mini Therapy Horses works with multiple service providers. All are licensed, certified and/or credentialed as per national and local health and human service requirements.


     6. Ronald McDonald Houses in LA & Pasadena

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         MTH Ranch

         RELATIONSHIP: Accompany Clients

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Mini Therapy Horses works with multiple service providers. All are licensed, certified and/or credentialed as per national and local health and human service requirements.


     7. Shriners for Children Medical Center

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         MTH Ranch

         RELATIONSHIP: Accompany Clients

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)

         Equine-Assisted Occupational Therapy/Physical Therapy/Speech-Language Pathology

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Mini Therapy Horses works with multiple service providers. All are licensed, certified and/or credentialed as per national and local health and human service requirements.


     8. The Greater Los Angeles Veterans Hospital

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         MTH Ranch

         RELATIONSHIP: Accompany Clients

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Mini Therapy Horses works with multiple service providers. All are licensed, certified and/or credentialed as per national and local health and human service requirements.


     9. TK-12 Schools

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         MTH Ranch

         RELATIONSHIP: Accompany Clients

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)

         Equine-Assisted Learning involving Academic Learning

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Mini Therapy Horses works with multiple service providers. All are licensed, certified and/or credentialed as per national and local health and human service requirements.


     10. UCLA Health Care System

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         MTH Ranch

         RELATIONSHIP: Accompany Clients

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)

         Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Mini Therapy Horses works with multiple service providers. All are licensed, certified and/or credentialed as per national and local health and human service requirements.


     11. Veterans Home of California - West Los Angeles

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         MTH Ranch

         RELATIONSHIP: Accompany Clients

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Mini Therapy Horses works with multiple service providers. All are licensed, certified and/or credentialed as per national and local health and human service requirements.


GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & FINANCIAL REPORTING

Staff & Volunteers:
Chief Staff Officer (CSO):  Victoria A. Nodiff-Netanel, President and Founder
Employees/Independent Contractors:   Full-Time:  1  Part-Time:  1  Volunteers:  20
Staff Recruitment, Screening and Training processes including employees and independent contractors:
    Our organization has a practice in place to ensure that the organization has sufficient knowledge of the background of prospective staff and independent contractors that may impact the safety of your clients and your horses, such as whether prospective staff/independent contractors serving in the capacity as staff have been convicted of a sexual offense or convicted for animal cruelty or neglect. Such practices must comply with local, state, and federal mandates.
    Staff and/or contractors are required to complete a Liability Release/Hold Harmless Agreement
    Staff and/or contractors are required to provide Emergency Medical Information
    Staff and/or contractors are required to sign a Photo Release
    Staff and/or contractors provide parent/guardian information if applicable
    Staff and/or contractors carry current health insurance
    Staff and/or contractors have a written job description
    Staff and/or contractors are evaluated on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in their job description
    Staff and/or contractors are updated on all the organization's policies and procedures on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in policy or procedure
    Staff and/or contractors receive training that includes safety guidelines, confidentiality, equine handling, equine identification, and emergency procedures; additional training is job specific
    Staff and/or contractors have a supervisor and is responsible for keeping their supervisor up to date on work related activities
    The organization provides a handbook to every member of the staff, including employees and/or independent contractors serving in staff positions;
    The handbook includes information, such as hours of work, vacation, sick leave, dress code, cell phone usage, and the protocol for dismissal
    The handbook is reviewed annually and updated
    One or more staff members or contractors are trained in CPR and human first aid
    One or more staff members or contractors are trained in equine first aid
Not Checked:
    Prospective staff/independent contractors complete a written application/agreement
    Prospective staff/independent contractors are required to undergo a Background Check
    Staff and/or contractors are subject to Random Drug Screening

Volunteer Recruitment, Screening and Training processes:
    Prospective volunteers complete a written application/agreement
    Our organization has a practice in place to ensure that the organization has sufficient knowledge of the background of prospective volunteers that may impact the safety of your clients and your horses, such as whether prospective volunteers have been convicted of a sexual offense or convicted for animal cruelty or neglect. Such practices must comply with local, state, and federal mandates.
    Every volunteer is required to complete a Liability Release/Hold Harmless Agreement
    Every volunteer is required to provide Emergency Medical Information
    Every volunteer is required to sign a Photo Release
    Every volunteer provides parent/guardian information if applicable
    Every volunteer carries current health insurance
    Every volunteer has a written job description
    Every volunteer is evaluated on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in their job description
    Every volunteer is updated on all the organization's policies and procedures on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in policy or procedure
    Every volunteer receives training that includes safety guidelines, confidentiality, equine handling, equine identification, and emergency procedures; additional training is job specific
    Every volunteer is assigned a supervisor (staff member and/or senior volunteer) and is responsible for keeping their supervisor up to date on work related activities
    The supervisor assesses the volunteer's abilities and assigns specific duties to the volunteer based on their skills
    The organization records and maintains written attendance information and hours on every volunteer
    The organization provides a Volunteer Handbook to every volunteer
    The Volunteer Handbook includes volunteer-related information, such as hours of work, dress code, cell phone usage, and the protocol for dismissal
    The Volunteer Handbook is reviewed annually and updated
    The organization holds regular orientation sessions for volunteers and prospective volunteers that includes an overview of the organization, its mission, activities, volunteer responsibilities and expectations, safety guidelines, and a tour of the facility
Not Checked:
    Prospective volunteers are required to undergo a Background Check
    Every volunteer is subject to Random Drug Screening

Governing Body:
Board meetings per year:  4
Number of Board Members:  9  Number of Voting Board Members:  9

Board Compensation:
Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  Yes
Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board/Staff Relationships:
Are any members of the Board, Staff or Program Participants related to each other through family or business relationships? No

Board Affiliations:
Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? No

Conflict of Interest:
Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy that ensures that any compensated board member is a NON-VOTING (Independent) board member or that any compensated board member or any board member related to a compensated staff member, independent contractor, or any related board members, or any individual or organization that might benefit from a board decision, abstains from voting on issues impacting such compensation and requires officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose at least annually in writing interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


Compliance:
Below is a list all local, state and federal licenses held by the organization, and/or accreditations or compliances with the published standards of an accrediting organization, if applicable:  n/a

Organization documents available on our website:
    None

Organization documents available on request:
    Most recent Financials
    Most recent IRS Form 990
    Most recent Annual Report
    Volunteer Handbook
    Staff Handbook
    Bylaws

Additional explanation regarding governance, staffing and volunteer practices or further explanation of the answers above.
Financial documents are available on GuideStar where we have a current Platinum Seal of Transparency.

Budget:  $100K to $500K
Equine Budget:   $100K to $150K
Month Fiscal Year Ends: 12
Type of Financial Reporting (Audit, Review, Compilation): Audit
Type of IRS Filing (990, 990-EZ, 990-N): 990
Does the uploaded Pro Forma 990/990 represent 2021? Yes
View The IRS Form 990/Pro Forma 990

POLICIES: ACQUISITION


Our organization acquires horses/equines from the following source(s):
    Purchase/Adoption from Owner  

Our organization does not acquire horses/equines from the following source(s):
    Donation  
    Lease  
    Auction  
    Kill pen/Feedlot  
    Return  
    Surrender  
    Seizure  
    Abandonment  

Our organization will accept the following:
    Mares

Not Checked:
    Geldings
    Pregnant Mares
    Foals
    Stallions
    Only Stallions to be castrated

Additional information about our acquisition policies and practices:
MTH is not a rescue organization, but if the welfare of a miniature horse was in jeopardy, we would absolutely be open to adopting or helping find them a home.


POLICIES: INTAKE, ASSESSMENT & TRAININING

Prior to a horse being accepted and/or arriving at the facility, the organization requires the following with respect to the health status of the horse:
    A current Coggins
    Vaccination records that have been administered within the last 12 months
    If health records are not available or are out-of-date, the owner is responsible for having vaccinations administered.
    A health certificate signed by a veterinarian and dated no more than seven days prior to arrival attesting to the health status of the equine is provided to our organization either prior to or upon arrival of the equine
Not Checked:
    If health records are not available or are out-of-date, our veterinarian will administer appropriate vaccinations

Prior to a horse being accepted and/or arriving at the facility, the organization has the following policies in place:
    The owner of a potential equine is interviewed over the phone or in person prior to seeing the equine
    The equine is evaluated at its place of residence
    The owner completes an application/contract which constitutes the agreement between the owner and our organization
    Equines are not taken on trial
Not Checked:
    The owner is financially responsible for the shipping of the equine to and from the organization

Following arrival of the equine at the facility, the following is performed:
    Physical examination by a veterinarian upon arrival and/or prior to quarantine departure
    Physical examination by trained barn staff
    Photographs are taken of each equine upon arrival at the facility and kept with the equine's health records
    Physical examination by a farrier
    Physical examination by a dentist
    Fecal test
    Vaccinations
    De-worming
Not Checked:
    A Henneke Body Conditioning Score or other body conditioning score is assigned
    Coggins test
    Blood work other than Coggins
    The equine is scanned to check for a microchip
    The equine is microchipped if the scan indicates that there is no microchip

Upon intake, the organization has the following quarantine policy in place:
    The equine is not quarantined
Not Checked:
    The equine is confined to a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine at the facility for a prescribed period of time
    The equine is confined to a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine off-site for a prescribed period of time

The typical length of quarantine is:   Horses are not quarantined

Horses are assessed for following skills and behaviors:
    Leading with a halter and lead rope
    Temperament, disposition and attitude, such as rated from very calm to very high spirited
    Bridling
    Lunging
    Loading onto and unloading off a trailer
    Tolerance to unusual objects and loud noises
    Known vices, i.e., cribbing, biting, kicking, weaving, stall walking, etc
    Grooming
    Bathing
    Clipping
    Tolerance to multiple handlers at the same time
Not Checked:
    Retrieval from a pasture/paddock
    Saddling
    Mounting and dismounting
    Riding at the walk
    Riding at the trot
    Riding at the canter
    Riding by a beginner and/or unbalanced rider
    Jumping
    Driving (Pulling a carriage)

Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to the ongoing assessment of horses in its care:
    The Henneke Body Condition score or other body conditioning score is updated at least annually
    Equines at our facility may be treated by an equine chiropractor
    Equines at our facility may be treated by an equine acupuncturist
    Equines at our facility may be treated by an equine massage therapist
    Equines at our facility may be treated by an equine nutritionist
    Physical examination by a veterinarian at least annually
Not Checked:
    The Henneke Body Condition score or other body conditioning score is updated at least monthly
    Photographs are taken of each equine monthly and kept with the equine's health records
    Photographs are taken of each equine annually and kept with the equine's health records
    
    
Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to the weight-carrying or workload capabilities of horses/equines that are ridden in our care:
    No equines are ridden; not applicable
Not Checked:
    Our organization evaluates at least annually and maintains a written record of the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine that is ridden
    Our organization does not evaluate the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine that is ridden

The following variables are considered in determining the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine that is ridden:
    No equines are ridden; not applicable
Not Checked:
    Equine age, weight, breed, body condition, fitness, balance, health and soundness
    Equine conformation to include the top line, length of back, strength and width of loin, bone density (measured by the circumference of the cannon bone just below the knee)
    Size, shape, condition and angle of the hooves
    Participant weight, height, body proportions, balance, fitness and riding skills as well as behavioral issues and safety concerns
    Weight and proper fit of the saddle and other equipment
    Terrain and footing in the working environment
    Duration and frequency of working sessions, as the frequency with which an equine is subjected to maximum weight carrying and/or workload
    Nature and pace of work, repetitive or varied, radius of turns, degree of incline and regularity of footing when equine is subject to maximum weight-carrying capacity
    Temperature and/or weather conditions
    Seasonal impact on the equines' workload and weight-carrying capabilities and limitations
    Our organization does not evaluate the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine that is ridden


Horses provided formal training (groundwork or riding):   2-3 times per week

Additional information about our intake, assessment & training policies and practices:
We do not regularly take in new horses. We do not quarantine our new horses. We purchase all of our horses as foals from well-known reputable breeders with whom we have a long standing relationship. Prior to shipping, each foal has undergone a full veterinary pre-purchase exam and has received all required vaccines and de-worming. Upon arrival at the MTH Ranch, each foal is evaluated by our own veterinarian and fecals are performed. If required, the equine will receive additional vaccines and de-worming.
     
     Our horses are exercised daily, weather permitting, via walks through our neighborhood or lunging in our round pen. Every walk is an opportunity to enjoy and connect with our horses while reinforcing important skills - being confident with new noises or sights, being pet and hugged, and walking calmly alongside the trainer in all environments.


POLICIES: BREEDING

The organization has the following policies related to breeding and stallions:
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, does NOT breed equines.
Not Checked:
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, breeds equines
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, are permitted to house stallions


POLICIES: EUTHANASIA

The organization has the following policies related to euthanasia:
    Our organization will never have an equine euthanized for space
    Our organization will never have a healthy equine euthanized under any circumstances
    Our organization may have an equine euthanized upon the recommendation of the veterinarian after all reasonable treatment options have been explored
    Euthanasia is done on site when possible to decrease trauma from transport
    Euthanasia is done at the veterinarian's facility
    Disposal of the carcass is handled within 24 hours
Not Checked:
    Our organization may have a healthy equine euthanized if it is a threat to itself, other equines, or people and euthanasia is recommended by a veterinarian

The following are authorized to administer the procedure for your organization in accordance with state laws:
    Veterinarian
Not Checked:
    A certified euthanasia technician
    Senior staff with appropriate training
    Employee of animal control shelter or humane society with appropriate training
    Veterinary student under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian
    Not applicable. Our organization prohibits euthanasia under any circumstances


POLICIES: RE-HOMING

View Re-homing Agreement
Our organization has the following re-homing (adoption/purchase) policies and procedures in place:
    All potential adopters/purchasers complete a written contract which constitutes the agreement between our organization and the new owner
Not Checked:
    Our organization does NOT re-home an equine to first time equine owners
    Our organization will only re-home an equine to a location where another equine resides
    Potential adopters/purchasers must visit our organization and be observed with the equine on site
    The distance of a potential adopter/purchaser's home from our facility is a consideration for when re-homing an equine
    Our organization conducts a site visit of the adopter/purchaser's facility before the transfer of the equine to the adopter/purchaser's facility
    Potential adopters/purchasers are encouraged to do a short-term, on-site foster with the equine
    Adopters/purchasers are NOT required to provide updates

The uploaded Re-homing agreement includes the following re-homing (adoption/purchase) statements:
    The agreement reflects that any individual or organization in possession of the equine as of the date of the agreement and any time thereafter is bound to not sell the equine at auction for slaughter or allow the equine to be sold, transferred, released, or otherwise placed into possession of any person or organization that will cause or allow the equine to be sold at auction for slaughter.
    The agreement states that should the adopter decide to re-home the equine, our organization must be notified of the name, address, and telephone number of any individual or organization intending to take possession of the equine for any reason prior to the equine being placed into the possession of such individual or organization.
    The agreement states that our organization reserves the right to make scheduled visits
Not Checked:
    The agreement states that re-homed equines CANNOT be sold, adopted, transferred, auctioned, released, given away, or otherwise placed into the possession of another individual or organization under any circumstances.
    The agreement states that should the adopter decide to re-home the equine, our organization must grant approval of any individual or organization intending to take possession of the equine for any reason prior to the equine being placed into the possession of such individual or organization, including being provided written notification of the name, address, and telephone number of any individual or organization intending to take possession of the equine for any reason.
    The agreement states that the terms of our organization's agreement will be binding on any future individual or organization taking and/or in possession of the equine for any reason.
    The agreement states that re-homed equines cannot be bred
    The agreement states that if there is any breach of contract the equine must be returned to our organization
    The agreement states that our organization reserves the right to make unannounced visits
    The agreement states that adopters/purchasers can return an equine to our organization free of charge
    The agreement states that adopters/purchasers can return an equine to our organization for a fee
    The agreement states that adopters/purchasers are required to provide updates (photos, vet records) for one year
    The agreement states that adopters/purchasers are required to provide updates (photos, vet records) for two years
    The agreement states that adopters/purchasers are required to provide updates (photos, vet records) for three or more years
    None of the statements are included.
    The organization does not re-home equines under any circumstances; our organization retains custody of our equines and ensures care of the equines for their lifetimes.
    Our organization does not have the authority to transfer ownership and/or does not own any of the equines involved with our programs.

Our organization requires references from the following:
    Not applicable or no references required.
Not Checked:
    Veterinarian
    Farrier
    Personal/Other

Transfer of ownership occurs:   Not applicable

The average equine re-homing (adoption/purchase) fee received by your organization:
Less than $200

Our organization has the following policies and procedures related to horses that need to be retired, are no longer useful, or are no longer manageable:
    Equines may remain at our organization for their lifetimes
Not Checked:
    Equines may be found suitable homes by our organization
    Equines may be returned to their owners
    Equines may be sent to auction
    In the case an equine is unmanageable and demonstrates repeated dangerous behaviors, the equine may be euthanized upon the recommendation of the veterinarian
    In the case an equine is unsound and/or unhealthy and cannot be treated to relieve suffering, the equine may be euthanized upon the recommendation of the veterinarian
    If a suitable home cannot be located within 12 months, the equine may be euthanized
    If a suitable home cannot be located, and space is not available for the equine to remain at the organization, the organization will secure a suitable home for the equine and accept financial responsibility for the lifetime of the equine

Additional information about our rehoming policies and practices:
We have only re-homed one horse that became too large for our program. This horse was adopted by a long time close personal friend who is also a horse trainer in California. This family had young children and it was a perfect fit for this horse. We receive constant photos and updates on this horse and are happy to see she remains healthy and happy. This is the only instance in which we have re-homed a horse. Going forward, should we need to rehome a horse, adopter(s) must sign the attached Rehoming Agreement.

EQUINE CARE & SHELTER/FACILITY INFORMATION

Total facilities at which our organization cares for and shelters horses used in our programs: 1
Our organization does not use satellite, overflow, foster, and/or outreach facilities



MANAGEMENT: MTH Ranch: *Main

Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Own

Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     LA Animal Services Animal Cruelty Task Force (213) 486-0450 or email at actf@lapd.lacity.org

Does your organization conduct Equine Assisted Services (EAS) at this facility in accordance with the EQUUS Foundation Guidelines on Qualifications of Organizations Conducting Equine Assisted Services (EAS)? Yes

Total number of Equine Assisted Service Providers AT THIS FACILITY, including instructors, specialists, therapists, counselors, coaches and/or facilitators (full-time, part-time, volunteer, independent contractors, and/or providers accompanying clients) that conduct Equine Assisted Services (EAS) in accordance with the EQUUS Foundation Guidelines on Qualifications of Organizations Conducting Equine Assisted Services (EAS) AT THIS FACILITY:  11

Equine Assisted Service Providers Assigned to this Facility: (see Equine Assisted Service Provider Section below for details)

     1. Area Pre-K-12 Schools, Colleges and Universities
     2. Cliffside Malibu Residential Rehabilitation Program
     3. Greater Los Angeles Public Library System
     4. LA County Dept of Children & Family Services Juvenile Court
     5. Los Angeles Mayor's Crisis Response Team
     6. Ronald McDonald Houses in LA & Pasadena
     7. Shriners for Children Medical Center
     8. The Greater Los Angeles Veterans Hospital
     9. TK-12 Schools
     10. UCLA Health Care System
     11. Veterans Home of California - West Los Angeles

VETERINARIAN INFORMATION: MTH Ranch: *Main
MTH Ranch: Vet Assessment conducted on 2022-03-28

Veterinarian: Dr. Richard Stevens
Clinic Name: Conejo Valley Equine
60 Cunningham Road
Thousand Oaks   CA   91362
Phone: 805-496-0505


GROUNDS: MTH Ranch: *Main
Total number of horses involved with your programs at this facility: 10
Total number of horses at this facility INCLUDING those not involved with your programs: 10
Maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 10
Total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 3/4
Our organization has use of the following at this facility:
Structures/Barns: 3  Run-in sheds:
Pastures: 1  Paddocks/Pens: 1
Uncovered Outdoor Rings: 1  Covered Outdoor Rings:   Indoor Rings:




















Regarding structures at this facility where horses are stalled:
Do horses have assigned stalls in the structure(s)?    Yes    
Do all stalls/enclosures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around?    Yes    
Is there adequate ceiling & beam height (a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear) when standing in all stalls/enclosures?    Yes    
How often are the stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 Days a Week
Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction?    Yes    
Is there a ventilation and circulation system in place to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases?    Yes    
Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety?    Yes    
Are fire prevention/protection measures (fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems) maintained and in good working order?     Yes    
Is there adequate lighting to ensure safety in all areas of facility?     Yes    
Are emergency contacts, including veterinarian contact information, conspicuously posted in easily accessible locations?    Yes    
Are human and equine first aid kits easily accessible?     Yes    

How many hours per day, on average, are horses stalled? 9-12
How many hours per day, on average, are horses turned out:
    Equines are out 9 to 15 hours per day

The following describes the pastures at this facility:
    This facility has a written plan in place for pasture management, which includes guidelines for seeding, fertilizing, irrigation, mowing, dragging, harrowing, manure removal, removal of debris, the control of poisonous plants, and a schedule for cleaning
    A dedicated staff person(s) is responsible for pasture management
    All pastures are fenced to prevent escape or injury
    Fencing checks, such as broken or missing planks, loose fence posts, exposed or loose nails, detached wires, etc., are done regularly
Not Checked:
    This facility does not have pastures where equines can graze on pasture grass
    Barbed wire is used for fencing
    Electric fencing is used; electric wires or tape fence are visibly marked
    Pastures are rotated
    Pastures have natural protection for equines (i.e., trees)
    Pastures have man-made protection for equines (i.e., shelters)

The following describes the turnout areas other than pastures at this facility:
    This facility has a written plan in place for the maintenance of turnout areas, which includes a schedule for cleaning, manure removal, and dragging
    A dedicated staff person(s) is responsible for the maintenance of turnout areas
    All turnout areas are fenced to prevent escape or injury
    Fencing checks, such as broken or missing planks, loose fence posts, exposed or loose nails, detached wires, etc., are done regularly
Not Checked:
    This facility does not have turnout areas
    Barbed wire is used for fencing
    Electric fencing is used; electric wires or tape fence are visibly marked
    Turnout areas have man-made protection for equines (i.e., shelters)

The following policies and procedures are in place at the facility to restrict public access and to keep horses safe:
    The property owner, staff member or caretaker lives on the premises and ensures that public access is restricted and is responsible for the security of the facility and equines
    Equines are checked overnight
    By Appointment Only signs are posted.
    No Trespassing signs are posted
    Hold Harmless signs are posted
    Authorized Personnel Only signs are posted
    Entrance gates are locked at night
    Visitors are only permitted at specific times
    Visitors are only permitted in specific areas
    Visitors are always accompanied by staff (or volunteers)
    The property is fitted with motion lights
    The property is fitted with a security system monitored by police or a professional service
    The property is fitted with a security system that is monitored internally by staff (or the property owner)
    The perimeter of the property is fully fenced
Not Checked:
    A security guard is present at night


EQUINE CARE: MTH Ranch: *Main
Horse Health Care/Barn Management Records: What system is used to collect and store health/horse care records?
    Notebook or equivalent (technology not utilized)
    Onsite computer with cloud-based backup storage system
    The organization utilizes its own system to maintain records
    Our organization would use free cloud-based barn management software if available

The following items are consistent with our feed management plan and practices:
    Equines are provided with individualized feeding plans, including supplements, according to age and any health issues
    Feed plans are determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    Supplement plans are determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    Equines are fed in individual stalls
    Staff and volunteers are trained in proper feed measurements and protocols and observed periodically to ensure they are feeding correctly
    The feed chart is centrally located and updated as needed
    The area(s) where hay, feed, grain, and supplements are stored are kept clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals in rodent-proof and mold-proof containers and grain bins
    Feed, supplements and hay types are clearly labeled
    Water sources, i.e., buckets, troughs, automatic waterers, etc. are kept clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals
    Medications are kept in a locked, climate-controlled area
Not Checked:
    Equines are fed in groups

Do horses have access to clean drinking water at all times?     Yes    

Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 4-8 weeks and when an issue arises

Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually and when an issue arises

Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? Every day or 6 days a week

Parasite Control: Our organization has the following worming protocols in place: (Check all that apply
    The protocol for each equine is determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    A de-wormer is used without fecal testing
Not Checked:
    Fecal testing is performed prior to the use of a de-wormer.

Fly/Insect Control: What remedies are used to control flies and insects?
    Fly Traps and Tapes
    Fly Spray Repellent
    Fly Masks
    Fly Sheets
    Fans

The following represent the biosecurity practices in place at facility:
    Our organization follows the AAEP's Biosecurity Guidelines and/or the UC Davis Biosecurity Guidelines
    Our organization follows the biosecurity guidelines of our veterinarian
    The organization has a written biosecurity plan
    All staff are trained in best practices related to biosecurity
    All volunteers are trained in best practices related to biosecurity
    A specific individual is assigned to care for sick, affected and/or quarantined equines
    Sick, affected and/or quarantined equines are cared for last if the caretaker must also care for healthy equines
    Sick, affected and/or quarantined equines do not have contact with other equines or other animals
    Restricted access signs are posted at primary points of access to sick, affected and/or quarantined equines
    Hand sanitizers and footbaths are available at all primary points of access to sick, affected and/or quarantined equines
    Manure and bedding from sick, affected and/or quarantined equines is disposed of in specific areas designated for infectious materials - not put in open air piles, and not spread on pastures
    Stalls, aisle ways, and common areas are disinfected after conclusion of the quarantine
    Trailers/vans used by sick, affected and/or quarantined equines are cleaned and disinfected after each use and cleaning takes place away from where equines are sheltered
    Equipment used by sick, affected and/or quarantined equines is not shared and is clearly labeled
    Shared equipment used by sick, affected and/or quarantined equines is cleaned of organic debris and disinfected after each use
    Latex gloves are worn when working with sick, affected and/or quarantined equines
    Personnel are required to leave the facility (or shower and change clothing) after working with quarantined equines
    Equines are not quarantined on arrival.
Not Checked:

Additional information about our biosecurity practices:
Fortunately there has never been a need to quarantine any of our horses. Should such a situation arise, we would take the horse to Alamo Pintado Equine Hospital (Santa Ynez, CA) to have it treated and quarantined. In the event that we must quarantine here at the facility, we would follow the aforementioned protocols/procedures.


The following represent the manure removal practices in place at facility:
    Manure is stored in dumpster(s)
    Manure is hauled, sold or given away
    Our organization adheres to the manure management guidelines set by state and/or local authorities
Not Checked:
    Manure is piled in an area where equines are not located
    Manure piles are covered
    Manure piles are composted or spread on pastures

The following steps are taken to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property:
    Equines are assigned the same stall/location each day
    Name plates are located on the stall
    Equines wear halters with nametags
    A notebook or binder with photos and information on each equine is easily accessible
    A map/diagram is posted showing the location of each equine with equine names and photos
    Equine photos and profiles are available on the website
    Staff and volunteers are provided with an information packet with equine profiles, including photos and detailed descriptions
    Staff/volunteers are provided training on conformation, markings, colors, and breeds
    Team leaders work with new staff/volunteers until they are able to identify the equines
Not Checked:
    Photos are located on the stall

Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to tack, apparel and equipment:
     All equines have specifically assigned tack, apparel and equipment that is not shared
    Blankets, sheets and turn out apparel are fitted and utilized for each equine appropriate to the equine's needs and the weather conditions
    Blankets, sheets and turn out apparel are cleaned regularly as needed
    Tack is cleaned after each use
    Tack is inspected for overall working condition before each use by trained personnel
    Tack is assessed for fit before each use by trained personnel
    Tack is assessed for fit by trained personnel when an equine's body condition changes
    Tack is assessed for fit by trained personnel when an equine's disposition changes
    Assigned tack is clearly labeled
    Tack is stored in a climate-controlled location
    No equines are ridden; not applicable.
Not Checked:
    Saddles are shared
    Saddle pads are shared
    Bridles are shared
    Bits are shared
    Blankets are shared
    Sheets are shared
    Turnout apparel is shared
     Halters are shared
    Tack is cleaned weekly
    Tack is cleaned only when needed
    This facility enlists the services of a professional saddle fitter at least once a year
    Helmets are shared
    Helmets are cleaned/disinfected after each use
    Helmets are replaced after a fall
    Helmets are replaced at least every five years.

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS: MTH Ranch: *Main
The following plans, policies, and procedures are in place at the facility to handle emergencies and address weather related issues, fire safety procedures, and/or any additional hazardous scenarios the facility could potentially experience:
    Emergency procedures are posted prominently
    Emergency phone numbers are posted prominently
    The facility owns or has access to a generator
    The facility maintains at least two weeks of hay, feed, shavings and medications
    The facility collects and maintains medical information from staff, volunteers, and clients
    The facility maintains appropriate liability and/or workers' compensation insurance
    All staff/volunteers are briefed regularly on emergency preparedness/safety procedures
    The organization has a written emergency preparedness/safety plan (EPP)
Not Checked:

The written EPP addresses the following areas:
    Local fire department and/or the state's emergency planning department procedures
    Medical emergencies for clients, staff, and volunteers
    Medical emergencies for equines
    Evacuation plans
    Power outages
    Fire
    Natural Disasters - thunderstorm, hurricanes, earthquakes, tornados, etc
    Terrorist attacks
    Protocols to notify emergency personnel
    Building/facility exit plans
Not Checked:


The facility follows the specific procedures to help PREVENT emergency situations:
    Smoking is strictly prohibited
    NO SMOKING signs are posted prominently
    Hay is stored away from permanent or temporary structures where equines are stalled
    Permanent or temporary structures where equines are stalled are kept free of dust, cobwebs, trash, cleaning rags, and other flammable items
    Aisles and doorways are kept clear
    Heaters with automatic shutoff settings are used
Not Checked:

How often are the following checked or performed?
Fire Extinguishers are checked: Semi-annually
Smoke detectors are checked: Semi-annually
Electrical Systems are checked: Semi-annually
Fence lines are checked: Daily
Turnout Areas are checked: Daily
Sprinkler systems are checked: Daily
Fire drills are conducted: Quarterly
Review of safety protocols with staff are conducted: Quarterly
Review of safety protocols with volunteers are conducted: Quarterly
The Emergency Preparedness Plan is reviewed and updated: Semi-annually

Equine Transportation
Owned onsite: 1 3-horse van/trailer with truck
Owned onsite: 1 6-horse van/trailer with truck
Access offsite: 1 2-horse van/trailer with truck
Access offsite: 1 3-horse van/trailer with truck
Access offsite: 1 4-horse van/trailer with truck
Access offsite: 1 6-horse van/trailer with truck
Access offsite: 1 8-horse van/trailer with truck
Access offsite: 1 10-horse van/trailer with truck


EQUINE CENSUS SUMMARY

Total Facilities: 1
MTH Ranch: 2021 - Yes

9 Total number of horses involved with your programs on January 1, 2021
PLUS: Horse Intake during 2021
0 Donated
0 Lease
1 Purchase from Owner
0 Auction
0 Kill Pen/Feedlot
0 Surrendered
0 Seized
0 Abandoned
0 Returned
0 Transfer
0 Born at facility
0 Adoption from Rescue
1 Total intakes
LESS: Horse Departure during 2021
0 Horses adopted/sold:
0 Horses transferred/returned
0 Horses deceased
0 Horses euthanized
0 Total departures
10 Number of horses involved with your programs on December 31, 2021
10 Total number of active horses (not retired) including
horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.
0 Total number of horses permanently retired.

Summary: 9 on 1/1/2021+ 1 Intakes - 0 Departures = 10 on 12/31/2021

Total days that equines were in the care of Mini Therapy Horses during 2021: 3430

2021 MTH Ranch Equine Census
9 Total number of horses involved with your programs on January 1, 2021
PLUS: Horse Intake during 2021
0 Donated
0 Lease
1 Purchase from Owner
0 Auction
0 Kill Pen/Feedlot
0 Surrendered
0 Seized
0 Abandoned
0 Returned
0 Transfer
0 Born at facility
0 Adoption from rescue
1 Total intakes
LESS: Horse Departure during 2021
0 Horses adopted/sold:
0 Horses transferred/returned
0 Horses deceased
0 Horses euthanized
0 Total departures
10 Number of horses involved with your programs on December 31, 2021
10 Total number of active horses (not retired) including
horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.
0 Total number of horses permanently retired.

Summary: 9 on 1/1/2021+ 1 Intakes - 0 Departures = 10 on 12/31/2021


1 Horse Intake Detail during 2021 0
0 Donated 0
0 Leased 0
1 Purchased from Owner 0
1Miniature Horse0 Aged Under 61 Aged 6-9  1 Mares
0 Auction 0
0 Kill Pen/Feedlot 0
0 Surrendered 0
0 Seized 0
0 Abandoned 0
0 Returned 0
0 Transferred 0
0 Born at facility 0
0 Adoption from rescue 0



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