EQUINE WELFARE NETWORK PROFILE
Gleneayre Equestrian Program



Gleneayre Equestrian Program
573 Eayrestown Road
Lumberton, NJ 08048

Mailing Address:
573 Eayrestown Road
Lumberton, NJ 08048


Phone: 609-267-4104  MAKE AN INQUIRY

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EIN: 23-2513468
Founded: 1988
Profile Last Updated April 14, 2022

Public Charity



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Equine Welfare Network Guardian
AWARDED ANNUALLY
Effective Date
May 2022

The Guardian Seal of Transparency is awarded annually to recognize an organization's commitment to transparency and accountability by their willingness to make comprehensive data about their programs, horse care practices, and governance available for public scrutiny. The Guardian Seal of Transparency is NOT an endorsement.
Awarded Annually
Effective Date: May 2022
Last Updated: July 06, 2022

MISSION & PROGRAMS

Mission:
We exist to provide a hands-on, experience-based learning environment for people in difficult situations, including children, families, and military personnel. We believe that the powerful connection between people and horses is transformational. Through horsemanship, we develop character, learn ethics and responsibility, grow physically and emotionally, and discover ourselves. Our own lives improve as we improve those of our horses.
     
     We focus on horses and people that are poorly served by more mainstream resources and programs.
     
     We are committed to children facing challenges at school and at home, to families struggling with the unique demands of military life, and to service members in need of support.
     
     In particular, we know that all children have the potential to become healthy, active, and productive young adults, and our horses help us get through to those who are otherwise hard to reach.
     
     We house a diverse group of horses for our program that are safe for interaction with children. We provide a caring, happy home for horses whose show careers are over, but who have lots of life left in them.
     
     Horses that come to our farm are provided sanctuary and are treated with dignity and respect for the remainder of their lives. We offer a safe option for owners looking to re-home their horses.

Our organization provides programs involved with equine retirement
Our organization conducts Equine Assisted Services in accordance with the EQUUS Foundation Guidelines on Qualifications of Organizations Conducting Equine Assisted Services (EAS).
Our organization provides community outreach and/or public education programs involving horses.
Our organization is directly responsible for the care and shelter of equines involved in our programs.
100% of our total programs and services are horse-related.
Our organization does not use satellite, overflow, foster, and/or outreach facilities
Number of facilities/locations where horses used in our programs are HOUSED AND CARED FOR or were HOUSED AND CARED FOR during 2021: 1
     1. Gleneayre Farm (*Main) Status: 2022 and 2021

Summary of organization's goals, strategies to achieve the goals, accomplishments, and capabilities to meet the goals, including its long-term plans to sustain its programs:
The goal of the Gleneayre equestrian program is to make our program easily accessible to more members of the local community so that we may demonstrate the effectiveness of equine-assisted services (EAS) and serve as a role model for future programs. We plan to achieve these goals by connecting with local schools, after-education programs, churches, law enforcement, recreational youth groups, and mental-health professionals. We hope to continue to serve our mission statement and show that the healing power of horse and human interaction is transformational and effectively changes lives for the better.
     
     Through our equine-assisted services we teach valuable life skills that will help facilitate our students’ personal development. Examples of these skills include attendance, discipline, task management, life choices, social interaction, and responsibility in their formative years. Our programs also aim to teach participants healthy coping mechanisms to meet the challenges of today’s world.
     
     Our accomplishments and successes have earned us multiple features in national equestrian publications and annual corporate sponsorships that have expanded awareness of our programs. With a history of success over 20 years, we hope to inspire other organizations to develop similar work-to-ride and equine-facilitated learning programs to serve at-risk youth in other areas. As our reputation and expertise continue to develop, we hope that our community impact is able to grow as well. With our improving brand awareness, we aim to utilize these platforms to continue our mission and share what we do at Gleneayre Equestrian Program with as many as possible including new audiences nationwide.
     
     In order to expand our community impact, our strategy continues to be that of hiring and retaining qualified personnel to enhance the services we offer. *Due to covid-19 and the departure of our Mental Health Professional we were unable to see clients in for EFMH in 2021. The Gleneayre Equestrian Program is actively seeking a licensed mental-health professional with equestrian experience to continue our mission of serving the community through our Equine-Facilitated Mental Health program.
     
     The GEP gathers information from parents and guidance counselors in order to provide personalized care and guidance for our students so that they may be successful. Through horses, we are able to give participants the opportunity to reconnect with themselves emotionally, socially, and physically. We strive to continue offering services that incorporate best practices that have been identified by experts in the field of equine-assisted learning and therapy. In order to achieve this, we work to keep our instructors’ certifications relevant and up-to-date, and continuously evaluate our horses to ensure that they are able to meet the appropriate to the needs of the program.
     
     We are consistently working to establish and maintain a diverse range of revenue streams including appeal campaigns, corporate support, major-donor cultivation, horse shows, and special events. We actively engage in corporate and local businesses sponsorships and in-kind partnerships. All the proceeds from our annual Gleneayre Horse Show and Hunter Derby directly benefit our programs. This event generates revenue through recurring sponsorships, entry fees, a silent auction, vendor fees, and in-kind donations of products and services. This event is not only a major fundraiser, but it also serves as a showcase for our students, and it is always rewarding to see the growth of our participants coupled with the joy of taking pride in their individual progress.

Horse Rescue, Rehabilitation, Retraining & Re-homing:
Overview of our programs involved with rescue, rehabilitation, retraining, re-homing and/or retirement:
     At Gleneayre, we use the powerful connection between horses and people to teach, learn, grow, and heal. Our own lives improve as we improve those of our horses, and so we provide a safe haven for our program horses to live with dignity, peace, and veterinary care for the remainder of their lives.
     
     Some of our program horses were rescued directly from abusive situations, like Rosie who was abandoned in Philadelphia, and Snowflake who was used as pit-bull bait. Also, by accepting donated horses that are no longer able to compete at a professional level, we are taking a proactive approach to ensure that they never end up in a situation where they are mistreated.
     
     All the horses are carefully selected for their temperaments and abilities to enter our Working Student riding program. Then, when the horses are no longer suitable for the riding program (often because of age), they move into our unmounted equine-facilitated group programs. We provide our horses with a new sense of purpose outside of the show ring, when they are no longer able to participate in our programs, they are able to enjoy a long and happy retirement of leisure and love.

Equine Assisted Services (EAS):
Our organization provides the following equine assisted services (EAS):
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Academic Learning
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development
Not Checked:
    Therapeutic Mounted Services
    Therapeutic Driving Services
    Therapeutic Vaulting Services
    Therapeutic Unmounted Services
    Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)
    Equine-Assisted Occupational Therapy/Physical Therapy/Speech-Language Pathology


Overview of our programs involved with providing EAS to individuals with special needs:
     The Gleneayre Equestrian Program is a non-profit organization for people experiencing difficulties, including academic, family, financial problems, and challenges associated with military families. Our programs include the Equine Facilitated Learning.
     
      Our Equine Facilitated Learning Program is particularly well-suited for children, families, corporate, and group training. Our staff can customize an experience that fits any needs and time constraints. Key outcomes include positive psychological (reduced aggression and anxiety), physiological (lowered blood pressure, heart rate, and stress hormones), and personal (sense of calm and self-awareness) improvement.
     
      GEP has partnered with Brookfield Schools. (https://brookfieldschools.org/). "Brookfield is a private school serving students needing intensive behavioral/therapeutic intervention." We are also constantly seeking new opportunities and partnerships with organizations in the local community.
     
      Alison Johnson, Gleneayre Managing Director and equine-assisted service provider, meets with Brookfield's Lead Therapist Jessica Ramsden to coordinate the EAS curriculum with the school syllabus. Assistant teachers, social workers, and one-on-one aides from Brookfield accompany their students to the EAS classes. The skills learned during EAS are then incorporated into the academic lessons taught at Brookfield School.
     
      *Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Equine Facilitated Learning Program was postponed on March 19, 2020, and resumed in September of 2021. We are currently running a spring 2022 session and look forward to the fall session of 2022. We are continuing to reach out to school counselors with program information.


At a time when equestrian sports are under pressure to protect horses while making those sports more accessible, so too must all equine organizations ensure that horses are treated humanely when interacting with people with and without special needs. Our organization takes the following steps to ensure that horses are benefiting from their interactions with people:
     At the Gleneayre Equestrian Program, we house a diverse group of safe donated horses for interaction with children. We provide a caring, happy home for horses whose show careers are over but with lots of life left. We maintain our horses to the highest standards, as we believe that they are all irreplaceable and directly affect the success of our program.
     We make it a priority to always allow our horses to have a choice in how and when they would like to engage with clients. In addition, our professionals are always instructed to be mindful of any nonverbal cues from our working horses to ensure that the appropriate course of action is taken to protect both the horses and human participants. Safety is our top priority, and through our programs, we can provide horses of all ages and backgrounds with a new purpose and the opportunity to give and receive the incredible benefits of healthy human-horse relationships in a secure environment.


Community Outreach and/or Public Education:
Overview of our programs involved with providing community outreach and/or public education programs involving horses:
     The Working Student program is designed for students as young as ten through their thirteenth year in school and matches each child with a project horse at our farm. Members are responsible for all aspects of caring for and riding their project horses.
     
      We instruct, monitor, and supervise our students closely. They are responsible for their horses, including grooming and exercising, cleaning stalls and tack, barn management, and limited aspects of supervised veterinary care.
     
      Our students work with their horses four days a week, one weekend day, and three days after school. In addition, each student keeps a log of their horse's care. We encourage our students to participate in IEA, 4-H, USEF- and USDF-sanctioned events, clinics, workshops, horse shows, academic competitions, and community service.
     
      Our Working Student Program provides a safe space for our students to learn, develop, and grow. Key outcomes include relationship-building skills, personal responsibility, self-confidence, and healthy stress relief.
     
      The Gleneayre Equestrian Program also offers presentations to local Girl Scouts and Cub Scouts, allowing them to learn about the horse-human connection while earning merit badges.

Research/Medical Use of Equines:
Our organization has never made, and would not ever consider making, equines available for research studies or medical training that involves invasive procedures and/or that which may cause pain or suffering to the equine. 

Religious Affiliation:
Our organization does not promote religious education, religious purposes, or a specific religious faith or use donations for religious education or religious purposes; require participants to be of a certain faith; require participation in religious, instruction, activities or services; or require participation in prayer, worship, religious instruction or other religious activities as a condition of receiving social or secular services offered. 

Auction Donation:
Our organization has never allowed, or would not consider allowing, an equine to be sold, transferred, released, or otherwise placed into possession of any person or organization that would cause or allow the equine to be sold at auction for slaughter. 

EQUINE ASSISTED SERVICES CENSUS

Gleneayre Farm
Current EAS Providers: 2
         
2021 EAS Operations Mounted Only Unmounted Only Both Mounted & Unmounted Total
Horses/Equines participating in EAS programs at this facility        
Number of horses/equines aged 3-8 0 0 0 0
Number of horses/equines aged 9-14 0 2 0 2
Number of horses/equines aged 15-20 0 0 0 0
Number of horses/equines Over 20 0 7 0 7
Total number of horses/equines participating in EAS programs at this facility 0 9 0 9
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Number of hours per day each horse works 0 1  
Number of days per week each horse works 0 1  
         
Clients participating in EAS programs at this facility Mounted Only Unmounted Only Both Mounted & Unmounted Total
Total number of individual clients (not lessons) served annually 0 10 0 10
Average number of clients (not lessons) participating in activities per week 0 10 0 10
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Number of days per week programs are conducted at this facility 0 1  
Number of weeks per year programs are conducted at this facility 0 12  
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Average wait list time for a client 0 Weeks 2 Weeks  
         

Additional explanation: *Additional Explanation for horse census: The remainder of the horses listed as "Active" in our horse census participate on our Working Student program and in other Community Outreach programs.


EQUINE ASSISTED SERVICE PROVIDERS


Equine Assisted Services (EAS):
Our organization provides the following Equine Assisted Services (EAS):
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Academic Learning
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development

2: Total number of Equine Assisted Service Providers at Gleneayre Farm

     1. Alison Johnson

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         Gleneayre Farm

         RELATIONSHIP: Employee

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Learning involving Academic Learning

         Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Managing Director and Trainer, Alison Johnson, is certified by EAGALA and Strides to Success and has been with the Program since 2001. She also has a degree in psychology and equine science from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Alison conducts Equine-Assisted Personal and/or Professional Development sessions. Her role in providing Equine-Assisted Learning involves working with Brookfield's Lead Therapist to establish the curriculum and overseeing the sessions in which students are accompanied by assistant teachers, social workers, and one on one aides.

Alison has served as barn manager for Frank Chapot (former Olympian and Chef d'équipe of the US Equestrian Team) and spent 15 years as a riding instructor. She is a member of the USEF, USDF, USHJA, and ECRDA.


     2. Brookfield Schools/Jessica Ramsden

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         Gleneayre Farm

         RELATIONSHIP: Other

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Learning involving Academic Learning

         Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Jessica Ramsden, MA,LPC,NBCC, is the Lead Therapist at Brookfield Schools and earned her undergraduate degree from Rutgers University and her Master's degree at La Salle University. She is a licensed professional counselor and a National Board Certified Counselor. Jessica Ramsden work with Alison Johnson to coordinate the EAS curriculum with the school syllabus. Assistant teachers, social workers, and one-on-one aides from Brookfield accompany their students to the EAS classes. The skills learned during EAS are then incorporated into the academic lessons being taught at Brookfield School.


GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & FINANCIAL REPORTING

Staff & Volunteers:
Chief Staff Officer (CSO):  Bill Rube, Executive Director
Employees/Independent Contractors:   Full-Time:  5  Part-Time:  0  Volunteers:  20
Staff Recruitment, Screening and Training processes including employees and independent contractors:
    Prospective staff/independent contractors complete a written application/agreement
    Our organization has a practice in place to ensure that the organization has sufficient knowledge of the background of prospective staff and independent contractors that may impact the safety of your clients and your horses, such as whether prospective staff/independent contractors serving in the capacity as staff have been convicted of a sexual offense or convicted for animal cruelty or neglect. Such practices must comply with local, state, and federal mandates.
    Staff and/or contractors are required to complete a Liability Release/Hold Harmless Agreement
    Staff and/or contractors are required to provide Emergency Medical Information
    Staff and/or contractors are required to sign a Photo Release
    Prospective staff/independent contractors are required to undergo a Background Check
    Staff and/or contractors provide parent/guardian information if applicable
    Staff and/or contractors carry current health insurance
    Staff and/or contractors have a written job description
    Staff and/or contractors are evaluated on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in their job description
    Staff and/or contractors are updated on all the organization's policies and procedures on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in policy or procedure
    Staff and/or contractors receive training that includes safety guidelines, confidentiality, equine handling, equine identification, and emergency procedures; additional training is job specific
    Staff and/or contractors have a supervisor and is responsible for keeping their supervisor up to date on work related activities
    The organization provides a handbook to every member of the staff, including employees and/or independent contractors serving in staff positions;
    The handbook includes information, such as hours of work, vacation, sick leave, dress code, cell phone usage, and the protocol for dismissal
    One or more staff members or contractors are trained in CPR and human first aid
    One or more staff members or contractors are trained in equine first aid
Not Checked:
    The handbook is reviewed annually and updated
    Staff and/or contractors are subject to Random Drug Screening

Volunteer Recruitment, Screening and Training processes:
    Prospective volunteers complete a written application/agreement
    Our organization has a practice in place to ensure that the organization has sufficient knowledge of the background of prospective volunteers that may impact the safety of your clients and your horses, such as whether prospective volunteers have been convicted of a sexual offense or convicted for animal cruelty or neglect. Such practices must comply with local, state, and federal mandates.
    Every volunteer is required to complete a Liability Release/Hold Harmless Agreement
    Every volunteer is required to provide Emergency Medical Information
    Every volunteer is required to sign a Photo Release
    Prospective volunteers are required to undergo a Background Check
    Every volunteer is evaluated on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in their job description
    Every volunteer is updated on all the organization's policies and procedures on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in policy or procedure
    Every volunteer receives training that includes safety guidelines, confidentiality, equine handling, equine identification, and emergency procedures; additional training is job specific
    Every volunteer is assigned a supervisor (staff member and/or senior volunteer) and is responsible for keeping their supervisor up to date on work related activities
    The supervisor assesses the volunteer's abilities and assigns specific duties to the volunteer based on their skills
Not Checked:
    Every volunteer provides parent/guardian information if applicable
    Every volunteer carries current health insurance
    Every volunteer has a written job description
    The organization records and maintains written attendance information and hours on every volunteer
    The organization provides a Volunteer Handbook to every volunteer
    The Volunteer Handbook includes volunteer-related information, such as hours of work, dress code, cell phone usage, and the protocol for dismissal
    The Volunteer Handbook is reviewed annually and updated
    The organization holds regular orientation sessions for volunteers and prospective volunteers that includes an overview of the organization, its mission, activities, volunteer responsibilities and expectations, safety guidelines, and a tour of the facility
    Every volunteer is subject to Random Drug Screening

Governing Body:
Board meetings per year:  2
Number of Board Members:  8  Number of Voting Board Members:  4

Board Compensation:
Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No
Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board/Staff Relationships:
Are any members of the Board, Staff or Program Participants related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes
If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board, Staff member and/or Program Participant.
The facility is owned by Ellen J. Healey who is the Founder/Trustee of the Gleneayre Equestrian Program. Her son, Robert T. Healey Jr., is a Trustee on the Board of Directors.

Board Affiliations:
Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? Yes
If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member, and the name of the related organization.
The Founder/Trustee Ellen Healey owns Gleneayre Farms which is the facility where programs are conducted.

Conflict of Interest:
Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy that ensures that any compensated board member is a NON-VOTING (Independent) board member or that any compensated board member or any board member related to a compensated staff member, independent contractor, or any related board members, or any individual or organization that might benefit from a board decision, abstains from voting on issues impacting such compensation and requires officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose at least annually in writing interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


Compliance:
Below is a list all local, state and federal licenses held by the organization, and/or accreditations or compliances with the published standards of an accrediting organization, if applicable:  N/A

Organization documents available on our website:
    None

Organization documents available on request:
    Most recent Financials
    Most recent IRS Form 990
    Most recent Annual Report
    Equine Intake Guidelines
    Adoption/Foster Agreement
    Staff Handbook
    Bylaws

Budget:  $1M to $2M
Equine Budget:   $250K to $500K
Month Fiscal Year Ends: 12
Type of Financial Reporting (Audit, Review, Compilation): Audit
Type of IRS Filing (990, 990-EZ, 990-N): 990
Does the uploaded Pro Forma 990/990 represent 2021? No
View The IRS Form 990/Pro Forma 990

POLICIES: ACQUISITION


Our organization acquires horses/equines from the following source(s):
    Donation  
    Lease  
    Purchase/Adoption from Owner  
    Kill pen/Feedlot  
    Return  

Our organization does not acquire horses/equines from the following source(s):
    Auction  
    Surrender  
    Seizure  
    Abandonment  

Our organization will accept the following:
    Geldings
    Mares
    Only Stallions to be castrated

Not Checked:
    Pregnant Mares
    Foals
    Stallions

POLICIES: INTAKE, ASSESSMENT & TRAININING

Prior to a horse being accepted and/or arriving at the facility, the organization requires the following with respect to the health status of the horse:
    A current Coggins
    Vaccination records that have been administered within the last 12 months
    If health records are not available or are out-of-date, the owner is responsible for having vaccinations administered.
    If health records are not available or are out-of-date, our veterinarian will administer appropriate vaccinations
Not Checked:
    A health certificate signed by a veterinarian and dated no more than seven days prior to arrival attesting to the health status of the equine is provided to our organization either prior to or upon arrival of the equine

Prior to a horse being accepted and/or arriving at the facility, the organization has the following policies in place:
    The owner of a potential equine is interviewed over the phone or in person prior to seeing the equine
    The equine is evaluated at its place of residence
    The owner completes an application/contract which constitutes the agreement between the owner and our organization
    The owner is financially responsible for the shipping of the equine to and from the organization
    Equines are on trial for up to 30 days
    The trial period may be reduced based on the equine's progress
    During the trial period, the organization accepts total financial responsibility for the care of the equine, including board, feed, shoeing and any necessary veterinary care
    The trial period may be terminated by either the organization or the owner for any reason
Not Checked:
    Equines are not taken on trial
    Equines are on trial up to 60 days
    Equines are on trial for 60 or more days
    During the trial period, the organization accepts financial responsibility for the care of the equine, including board, feed, shoeing and any necessary veterinary care, up to a fixed amount agreed upon by the organization and the owner
    During the trial period, the owner/donor is financially responsible for the care of the equine, including board, feed, shoeing and any necessary veterinary care

Following arrival of the equine at the facility, the following is performed:
    Physical examination by a veterinarian upon arrival and/or prior to quarantine departure
    Physical examination by trained barn staff
    Photographs are taken of each equine upon arrival at the facility and kept with the equine's health records
    A Henneke Body Conditioning Score or other body conditioning score is assigned
    Physical examination by a farrier
    Physical examination by a dentist
    Coggins test
    Blood work other than Coggins
    Fecal test
    Vaccinations
    De-worming
    The equine is scanned to check for a microchip
Not Checked:
    The equine is microchipped if the scan indicates that there is no microchip

Upon intake, the organization has the following quarantine policy in place:
    The equine is confined to a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine at the facility for a prescribed period of time
Not Checked:
    The equine is confined to a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine off-site for a prescribed period of time
    The equine is not quarantined

The typical length of quarantine is:   20 to 30 days

Horses are assessed for following skills and behaviors:
    Retrieval from a pasture/paddock
    Leading with a halter and lead rope
    Temperament, disposition and attitude, such as rated from very calm to very high spirited
    Saddling
    Bridling
    Lunging
    Loading onto and unloading off a trailer
    Mounting and dismounting
    Riding at the walk
    Riding at the trot
    Riding at the canter
    Riding by a beginner and/or unbalanced rider
    Jumping
    Tolerance to unusual objects and loud noises
    Known vices, i.e., cribbing, biting, kicking, weaving, stall walking, etc
    Grooming
    Bathing
    Clipping
    Tolerance to multiple handlers at the same time
Not Checked:
    Driving (Pulling a carriage)

Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to the ongoing assessment of horses in its care:
    The Henneke Body Condition score or other body conditioning score is updated at least monthly
    Equines at our facility may be treated by an equine chiropractor
    Equines at our facility may be treated by an equine acupuncturist
    Equines at our facility may be treated by an equine massage therapist
    Equines at our facility may be treated by an equine nutritionist
    Physical examination by a veterinarian at least annually
Not Checked:
    The Henneke Body Condition score or other body conditioning score is updated at least annually
    Photographs are taken of each equine monthly and kept with the equine's health records
    Photographs are taken of each equine annually and kept with the equine's health records
    
    
Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to the weight-carrying or workload capabilities of horses/equines that are ridden in our care:
    Our organization evaluates at least annually and maintains a written record of the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine that is ridden
Not Checked:
    Our organization does not evaluate the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine that is ridden
    No equines are ridden; not applicable

The following variables are considered in determining the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine that is ridden:
    Equine age, weight, breed, body condition, fitness, balance, health and soundness
    Equine conformation to include the top line, length of back, strength and width of loin, bone density (measured by the circumference of the cannon bone just below the knee)
    Size, shape, condition and angle of the hooves
    Participant weight, height, body proportions, balance, fitness and riding skills as well as behavioral issues and safety concerns
    Weight and proper fit of the saddle and other equipment
    Terrain and footing in the working environment
    Duration and frequency of working sessions, as the frequency with which an equine is subjected to maximum weight carrying and/or workload
    Nature and pace of work, repetitive or varied, radius of turns, degree of incline and regularity of footing when equine is subject to maximum weight-carrying capacity
    Temperature and/or weather conditions
    Seasonal impact on the equines' workload and weight-carrying capabilities and limitations
Not Checked:
    Our organization does not evaluate the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine that is ridden
    No equines are ridden; not applicable


Horses provided formal training (groundwork or riding):   Daily


POLICIES: BREEDING

The organization has the following policies related to breeding and stallions:
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, does NOT breed equines.
Not Checked:
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, breeds equines
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, are permitted to house stallions


POLICIES: EUTHANASIA

The organization has the following policies related to euthanasia:
    Our organization will never have an equine euthanized for space
    Our organization will never have a healthy equine euthanized under any circumstances
    Our organization may have an equine euthanized upon the recommendation of the veterinarian after all reasonable treatment options have been explored
    Euthanasia is done on site when possible to decrease trauma from transport
    Euthanasia is done at the veterinarian's facility
    Disposal of the carcass is handled within 24 hours
Not Checked:
    Our organization may have a healthy equine euthanized if it is a threat to itself, other equines, or people and euthanasia is recommended by a veterinarian

The following are authorized to administer the procedure for your organization in accordance with state laws:
    Veterinarian
Not Checked:
    A certified euthanasia technician
    Senior staff with appropriate training
    Employee of animal control shelter or humane society with appropriate training
    Veterinary student under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian
    Not applicable. Our organization prohibits euthanasia under any circumstances


POLICIES: RE-HOMING

Re-homing Agreement not applicable.
Our organization has the following re-homing (adoption/purchase) policies and procedures in place:
    The organization does not re-home equines under any circumstances; our organization retains custody of our equines and ensures care of the equines for their lifetimes.

Our organization has the following policies and procedures related to horses that need to be retired, are no longer useful, or are no longer manageable:
    The organization does not re-home equines under any circumstances; our organization retains custody of our equines and ensures care of the equines for their lifetimes.


EQUINE CARE & SHELTER/FACILITY INFORMATION

Total facilities at which our organization cares for and shelters horses used in our programs: 1
Our organization does not use satellite, overflow, foster, and/or outreach facilities



MANAGEMENT: Gleneayre Farm: *Main

Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     NJSPCA, 1119 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 Phone: 800-582-5979

Does your organization conduct Equine Assisted Services (EAS) at this facility in accordance with the EQUUS Foundation Guidelines on Qualifications of Organizations Conducting Equine Assisted Services (EAS)? Yes

Total number of Equine Assisted Service Providers AT THIS FACILITY, including instructors, specialists, therapists, counselors, coaches and/or facilitators (full-time, part-time, volunteer, independent contractors, and/or providers accompanying clients) that conduct Equine Assisted Services (EAS) in accordance with the EQUUS Foundation Guidelines on Qualifications of Organizations Conducting Equine Assisted Services (EAS) AT THIS FACILITY:  2

Equine Assisted Service Providers Assigned to this Facility: (see Equine Assisted Service Provider Section below for details)

     1. Alison Johnson
     2. Brookfield Schools/Jessica Ramsden

VETERINARIAN INFORMATION: Gleneayre Farm: *Main
Gleneayre Farm: Vet Assessment conducted on 2022-03-21

Veterinarian: Ted Mazzarisi
Clinic Name: East Coast Equine
191 Rt 545
Chesterfield   NJ   08515
Phone: 732-757-7521


GROUNDS: Gleneayre Farm: *Main
Total number of horses involved with your programs at this facility: 29
Total number of horses at this facility INCLUDING those not involved with your programs: 34
Maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 40
Total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 70
Our organization has use of the following at this facility:
Structures/Barns: 5  Run-in sheds: 0
Pastures: 20  Paddocks/Pens: 1
Uncovered Outdoor Rings: 2  Covered Outdoor Rings: 1  Indoor Rings: 0














Regarding structures at this facility where horses are stalled:
Do horses have assigned stalls in the structure(s)?    Yes    
Do all stalls/enclosures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around?    Yes    
Is there adequate ceiling & beam height (a minimum of 12 inches above the tip of the horse's ear) when standing in all stalls/enclosures?    Yes    
How often are the stalls/enclosures cleaned? 6-7 Days a Week
Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction?    Yes    
Is there a ventilation and circulation system in place to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases?    Yes    
Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety?    Yes    
Are fire prevention/protection measures (fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems) maintained and in good working order?     Yes    
Is there adequate lighting to ensure safety in all areas of facility?     Yes    
Are emergency contacts, including veterinarian contact information, conspicuously posted in easily accessible locations?    Yes    
Are human and equine first aid kits easily accessible?     Yes    

How many hours per day, on average, are horses stalled? 9-12
How many hours per day, on average, are horses turned out:
    Equines are out 4 to 8 hours per day

The following describes the pastures at this facility:
    This facility has a written plan in place for pasture management, which includes guidelines for seeding, fertilizing, irrigation, mowing, dragging, harrowing, manure removal, removal of debris, the control of poisonous plants, and a schedule for cleaning
    A dedicated staff person(s) is responsible for pasture management
    All pastures are fenced to prevent escape or injury
    Fencing checks, such as broken or missing planks, loose fence posts, exposed or loose nails, detached wires, etc., are done regularly
    Pastures are rotated
    Pastures have natural protection for equines (i.e., trees)
Not Checked:
    This facility does not have pastures where equines can graze on pasture grass
    Barbed wire is used for fencing
    Electric fencing is used; electric wires or tape fence are visibly marked
    Pastures have man-made protection for equines (i.e., shelters)

The following describes the turnout areas other than pastures at this facility:
    This facility has a written plan in place for the maintenance of turnout areas, which includes a schedule for cleaning, manure removal, and dragging
    A dedicated staff person(s) is responsible for the maintenance of turnout areas
    All turnout areas are fenced to prevent escape or injury
    Fencing checks, such as broken or missing planks, loose fence posts, exposed or loose nails, detached wires, etc., are done regularly
Not Checked:
    This facility does not have turnout areas
    Barbed wire is used for fencing
    Electric fencing is used; electric wires or tape fence are visibly marked
    Turnout areas have man-made protection for equines (i.e., shelters)

The following policies and procedures are in place at the facility to restrict public access and to keep horses safe:
    The property owner, staff member or caretaker lives on the premises and ensures that public access is restricted and is responsible for the security of the facility and equines
    Equines are checked overnight
    No Trespassing signs are posted
    Hold Harmless signs are posted
    Entrance gates are locked at night
    Visitors are only permitted at specific times
    Visitors are only permitted in specific areas
    The property is fitted with motion lights
    The property is fitted with a security system that is monitored internally by staff (or the property owner)
    The perimeter of the property is fully fenced
Not Checked:
    A security guard is present at night
    By Appointment Only signs are posted.
    Authorized Personnel Only signs are posted
    Visitors are always accompanied by staff (or volunteers)
    The property is fitted with a security system monitored by police or a professional service


EQUINE CARE: Gleneayre Farm: *Main
Horse Health Care/Barn Management Records: What system is used to collect and store health/horse care records?
    Onsite computer with onsite backup storage system
    Our organization would use free cloud-based barn management software if available

The following items are consistent with our feed management plan and practices:
    Equines are provided with individualized feeding plans, including supplements, according to age and any health issues
    Feed plans are determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    Supplement plans are determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    Equines are fed in individual stalls
    Staff and volunteers are trained in proper feed measurements and protocols and observed periodically to ensure they are feeding correctly
    The feed chart is centrally located and updated as needed
    The area(s) where hay, feed, grain, and supplements are stored are kept clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals in rodent-proof and mold-proof containers and grain bins
    Feed, supplements and hay types are clearly labeled
    Water sources, i.e., buckets, troughs, automatic waterers, etc. are kept clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals
    Medications are kept in a locked, climate-controlled area
Not Checked:
    Equines are fed in groups

Do horses have access to clean drinking water at all times?     Yes    

Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 4-8 weeks and when an issue arises

Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually and when an issue arises

Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? Every day or 6 days a week

Parasite Control: Our organization has the following worming protocols in place: (Check all that apply
    The protocol for each equine is determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    Fecal testing is performed prior to the use of a de-wormer.
Not Checked:
    A de-wormer is used without fecal testing

Fly/Insect Control: What remedies are used to control flies and insects?
    Fly parasites
    Fly Spray Repellent
    Fly Masks
    Fans

The following represent the biosecurity practices in place at facility:
    Our organization follows the AAEP's Biosecurity Guidelines and/or the UC Davis Biosecurity Guidelines
    Our organization follows the biosecurity guidelines of our veterinarian
    The organization has a written biosecurity plan
    All staff are trained in best practices related to biosecurity
    All volunteers are trained in best practices related to biosecurity
    A specific individual is assigned to care for sick, affected and/or quarantined equines
    Sick, affected and/or quarantined equines are cared for last if the caretaker must also care for healthy equines
    Sick, affected and/or quarantined equines do not have contact with other equines or other animals
    Restricted access signs are posted at primary points of access to sick, affected and/or quarantined equines
    Hand sanitizers and footbaths are available at all primary points of access to sick, affected and/or quarantined equines
    Manure and bedding from sick, affected and/or quarantined equines is disposed of in specific areas designated for infectious materials - not put in open air piles, and not spread on pastures
    Stalls, aisle ways, and common areas are disinfected after conclusion of the quarantine
    Trailers/vans used by sick, affected and/or quarantined equines are cleaned and disinfected after each use and cleaning takes place away from where equines are sheltered
    Equipment used by sick, affected and/or quarantined equines is not shared and is clearly labeled
    Shared equipment used by sick, affected and/or quarantined equines is cleaned of organic debris and disinfected after each use
    Latex gloves are worn when working with sick, affected and/or quarantined equines
    Personnel are required to leave the facility (or shower and change clothing) after working with quarantined equines
Not Checked:
    Equines are not quarantined on arrival.

The following represent the manure removal practices in place at facility:
    Manure is stored in dumpster(s)
    Manure is hauled, sold or given away
    Our organization adheres to the manure management guidelines set by state and/or local authorities
Not Checked:
    Manure is piled in an area where equines are not located
    Manure piles are covered
    Manure piles are composted or spread on pastures

The following steps are taken to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property:
    Equines are assigned the same stall/location each day
    Name plates are located on the stall
    A map/diagram is posted showing the location of each equine with equine names and photos
    Equine photos and profiles are available on the website
    Team leaders work with new staff/volunteers until they are able to identify the equines
Not Checked:
    Photos are located on the stall
    Equines wear halters with nametags
    A notebook or binder with photos and information on each equine is easily accessible
    Staff and volunteers are provided with an information packet with equine profiles, including photos and detailed descriptions
    Staff/volunteers are provided training on conformation, markings, colors, and breeds

Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to tack, apparel and equipment:
     All equines have specifically assigned tack, apparel and equipment that is not shared
    Blankets, sheets and turn out apparel are fitted and utilized for each equine appropriate to the equine's needs and the weather conditions
    Blankets, sheets and turn out apparel are cleaned regularly as needed
    Tack is cleaned after each use
    Tack is inspected for overall working condition before each use by trained personnel
    Tack is assessed for fit before each use by trained personnel
    Tack is assessed for fit by trained personnel when an equine's body condition changes
    Tack is assessed for fit by trained personnel when an equine's disposition changes
    Assigned tack is clearly labeled
    Tack is stored in a climate-controlled location
    Helmets are replaced after a fall
Not Checked:
    Saddles are shared
    Saddle pads are shared
    Bridles are shared
    Bits are shared
    Blankets are shared
    Sheets are shared
    Turnout apparel is shared
     Halters are shared
    Tack is cleaned weekly
    Tack is cleaned only when needed
    This facility enlists the services of a professional saddle fitter at least once a year
    Helmets are shared
    Helmets are cleaned/disinfected after each use
    Helmets are replaced at least every five years.
    No equines are ridden; not applicable.

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS: Gleneayre Farm: *Main
The following plans, policies, and procedures are in place at the facility to handle emergencies and address weather related issues, fire safety procedures, and/or any additional hazardous scenarios the facility could potentially experience:
    Emergency procedures are posted prominently
    Emergency phone numbers are posted prominently
    The facility owns or has access to a generator
    The facility maintains at least two weeks of hay, feed, shavings and medications
    The facility collects and maintains medical information from staff, volunteers, and clients
    The facility maintains appropriate liability and/or workers' compensation insurance
    All staff/volunteers are briefed regularly on emergency preparedness/safety procedures
    The organization has a written emergency preparedness/safety plan (EPP)
Not Checked:

The written EPP addresses the following areas:
    Local fire department and/or the state's emergency planning department procedures
    Medical emergencies for clients, staff, and volunteers
    Medical emergencies for equines
    Evacuation plans
    Power outages
    Fire
    Natural Disasters - thunderstorm, hurricanes, earthquakes, tornados, etc
    Protocols to notify emergency personnel
    Building/facility exit plans
Not Checked:
    Terrorist attacks


The facility follows the specific procedures to help PREVENT emergency situations:
    Smoking is strictly prohibited
    NO SMOKING signs are posted prominently
    Permanent or temporary structures where equines are stalled are kept free of dust, cobwebs, trash, cleaning rags, and other flammable items
    Aisles and doorways are kept clear
    Heaters with automatic shutoff settings are used
Not Checked:
    Hay is stored away from permanent or temporary structures where equines are stalled

How often are the following checked or performed?
Fire Extinguishers are checked: Monthly
Smoke detectors are checked: Monthly
Electrical Systems are checked: Monthly
Fence lines are checked: Daily
Turnout Areas are checked: Daily
Sprinkler systems are checked: Not at all/NA
Fire drills are conducted: Not at all/NA
Review of safety protocols with staff are conducted: Monthly
Review of safety protocols with volunteers are conducted: Monthly
The Emergency Preparedness Plan is reviewed and updated: Monthly

Equine Transportation
Owned onsite: 1 2-horse van/trailer with truck
Owned onsite: 1 6-horse van/trailer with truck


EQUINE CENSUS SUMMARY

Total Facilities: 1
Gleneayre Farm: 2021 - Yes

29 Total number of horses involved with your programs on January 1, 2021
PLUS: Horse Intake during 2021
2 Donated
0 Lease
0 Purchase from Owner
0 Auction
0 Kill Pen/Feedlot
0 Surrendered
0 Seized
0 Abandoned
0 Returned
0 Transfer
0 Born at facility
0 Adoption from Rescue
2 Total intakes
LESS: Horse Departure during 2021
0 Horses adopted/sold:
0 Horses transferred/returned
2 Horses deceased
0 Horses euthanized
2 Total departures
29 Number of horses involved with your programs on December 31, 2021
27 Total number of active horses (not retired) including
horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.
2 Total number of horses permanently retired.

Summary: 29 on 1/1/2021+ 2 Intakes - 2 Departures = 29 on 12/31/2021

Total days that equines were in the care of Gleneayre Equestrian Program during 2021: 10391

2021 Gleneayre Farm Equine Census
29 Total number of horses involved with your programs on January 1, 2021
PLUS: Horse Intake during 2021
2 Donated
0 Lease
0 Purchase from Owner
0 Auction
0 Kill Pen/Feedlot
0 Surrendered
0 Seized
0 Abandoned
0 Returned
0 Transfer
0 Born at facility
0 Adoption from rescue
2 Total intakes
LESS: Horse Departure during 2021
0 Horses adopted/sold:
0 Horses transferred/returned
2 Horses deceased
0 Horses euthanized
2 Total departures
29 Number of horses involved with your programs on December 31, 2021
27 Total number of active horses (not retired) including
horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.
2 Total number of horses permanently retired.

Summary: 29 on 1/1/2021+ 2 Intakes - 2 Departures = 29 on 12/31/2021


2 Horse Intake Detail during 2021 0
2 Donated 0
2Warm Blood1 Aged 10-14  1 Mares1 Aged Over 20  1 Geldings
0 Leased 0
0 Purchased from Owner 0
0 Auction 0
0 Kill Pen/Feedlot 0
0 Surrendered 0
0 Seized 0
0 Abandoned 0
0 Returned 0
0 Transferred 0
0 Born at facility 0
0 Adoption from rescue 0



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