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Seeking large weight carrier for therapeutic riding program
High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc., Old Lyme, CT


Could this be the next chapter for your horse?


We are seeking a Horse that meets the following criteria:
Age Range:
Aged 3-9  Aged 10-14  Aged 15-20  

Gender:
Geldings  Mares  

Size Preference:
Small Horse (14.3 to 15.3h), Large Horse (16.0 to 16.3h),

Breed Preference: The following breeds will NOT be considered:
Hackney
Paso Fino
Rocky Mountain Horse
Missouri Fox Trotter

Other breeds we will NOT consider:
Gaited horses

Our organization has the following policies about horses who are sound and healthy but have the following chronic conditions that require medication:
Lyme Disease: Accept with financial assistance for medication
Cushing's Disease: Accept
Thyroid Disease: Accept
Navicular Disease: Accept
Inflammation: Accept with financial assistance for medication

Experience & Suitability

Temperament:
Seeking horses who enjoy the company of people are who are tolerant of beginner handlers and riders. Good natured easy-keepers are our favorites!

Activities that the equine will be expected to perform:
    English Walk/Trot/Canter
    Western Walk/Trot/Canter
    Horsemanship (grooming, tacking up & handling by individuals with disabilities)
    Unmounted activities including handling when at liberty in a round pen or arena
    Trail riding

Current/former experience/training which could make the equine suitable for your program:
    Dressage
    Driving
    English Pleasure
    Eventing
    Endurance
    Hunter
    Hunter Seat Equitation
    Jumping
    Parade Horse
    Polo
    Reining
    Rodeo
    Trail Riding
    Vaulting
    Western Dressage
    Western Pleasure
    Western Ranch
    Western Seat Equitation

Location

The equine will be located at High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, 36 Town Woods Road, Old Lyme, CT 06371.

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More about where will the equine be located?


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Total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 40
Our organization has use of the following at this facility:
Structures/Barns: 1  Run-in sheds: 14
Pastures: 12  Paddocks/Pens: 1
Uncovered Outdoor Rings: 1  Covered Outdoor Rings: 0
Indoor Rings: 1

Horses have assigned stalls in the structure(s).
Horses are stalled for 1-3; hours per day, on average.
Horse Turn Out Practices:
    Horses are out 24/7 except when they are used for the conduct of the organization's programs

The following describes the pastures at this facility:
    This facility has a written plan in place for pasture management, which includes guidelines for seeding, fertilizing, irrigation, mowing, dragging, harrowing, manure removal, removal of debris, the control of poisonous plants, and a schedule for cleaning
    A dedicated staff person(s) is responsible for pasture management
    All pastures are fenced to prevent escape or injury
    Electric fencing is used; electric wires or tape fence are visibly marked
    Fencing checks, such as broken or missing planks, loose fence posts, exposed or loose nails, detached wires, etc., are done regularly
    Pastures are rotated
    Pastures have natural protection for horses (i.e., trees)
    Pastures have man-made protection for horses (i.e., shelters)

The following describes the turnout areas other than pastures at this facility:
    This facility has a written plan in place for the maintenance of turnout areas, which includes a schedule for cleaning, manure removal, and dragging
    A dedicated staff person(s) is responsible for the maintenance of turnout areas
    All turnout areas are fenced to prevent escape or injury
    Electric fencing is used; electric wires or tape fence are visibly marked
    Turnout areas have man-made protection for horses (i.e., shelters)
    Fencing checks, such as broken or missing planks, loose fence posts, exposed or loose nails, detached wires, etc., are done regularly

The following items are consistent with our feed management plan and practices:
    Horses are provided with individualized feeding plans, including supplements, according to age and any health issues
    Feed plans are determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    Supplement plans are determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    Horses are fed in individual stalls
    Staff and volunteers are trained in proper feed measurements and protocols and observed periodically to ensure they are feeding correctly
    The feed chart is centrally located and updated as needed
    The area(s) where hay, feed, grain, and supplements are stored are kept clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals in rodent-proof and mold-proof containers and grain bins
    Feed, supplements and hay types are clearly labeled
    Water sources, i.e., buckets, troughs, automatic waterers, etc. are kept clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals
    Medications are kept in a locked, climate-controlled area

Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to the ongoing assessment of horses in its care:
    Horses are assigned a Henneke Body Condition score upon arrival at the facility
    The Henneke Body Condition score is updated annually
    The Henneke Body Condition score is updated with each visit by the veterinarian
    Photographs are taken of each horse upon arrival at the facility and kept with the horse's health records
    Photographs are taken of each horse annually and kept with the horse's health records
    Horses at our facility may be treated by an equine chiropractor
    Horses at our facility may be treated by an equine acupuncturist
    Horses at our facility may be treated by an equine massage therapist



Horses have access to clean drinking water at all times

Hoof care is provided for each horse: Every 4-8 weeks and when an issue arises

Dental care is provided for each horse: Annually and when an issue arises

Each horse is given a physical exam by a veterinarian: Annually and when an issue arises

Each horse is visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility: Every day or 6 days a week

Our organization has the following worming protocols in place to control parasites:
    The protocol for each horse is determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    Fecal testing is performed prior to the use of a de-wormer.

Fly/Insect Control - Remedies used to control flies and insects:
    Fly Traps and Tapes
    Fly Spray Repellent
    Fly Masks
    Fly Sheets
    Fans



Our Acquisition, Intake & Training Policies


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High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc. will accept equines from the following sources:
    Donation  ✔ Yes      No    
    Free Lease  ✔ Yes      No    
    Purchase/Adoption from Owner  ✔ Yes      No    

High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc. requires the following with respect to the health status of the equine prior to acceptance and arrival at the organization:
    A current Coggins
    Vaccination records that have been administered within the last 12 months
    If health records are not available or are out-of-date, the owner is responsible for having vaccinations administered.

High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc. has the following policies in place prior to an equine being accepted and/or arriving at the facility:
    The owner of a potential horse is interviewed over the phone or in person prior to seeing the horse
    The horse is evaluated at its place of residence
    The owner completes an application/contract which constitutes the agreement between the owner and our organization
    The owner is financially responsible for the shipping of the horse to and from the organization
    Horses are on trial for 60 or more days
    The trial period may be reduced based on the horse's progress
    During the trial period, the organization accepts total financial responsibility for the care of the horse, including board, feed, shoeing and any necessary veterinary care
    The trial period may be terminated by either the organization or the owner for any reason

High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc. assesses equines for following skills and behaviors:
    Retrieval from a pasture/paddock
    Leading with a halter and lead rope
    Temperament, disposition and attitude, such as rated from very calm to very high spirited
    Saddling
    Bridling
    Lunging
    Loading onto and unloading off a trailer
    Mounting and dismounting
    Riding at the walk
    Riding at the trot
    Riding at the canter
    Riding by a beginner and/or unbalanced rider
    Driving (Pulling a carriage)
    Tolerance to unusual objects and loud noises
    Known vices, i.e., cribbing, biting, kicking, weaving, stall walking, etc
    Grooming
    Bathing
    Clipping
    Tolerance to multiple handlers at the same time

Following arrival at the facility, the following is performed:
    Physical examination by a veterinarian
    Physical examination by trained barn staff
    Photographs are taken
    A Henneke Body Conditioning Score is assigned
    Fecal test
    The horse is scanned to check for a microchip
    The horse is confined to a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine at the facility for a prescribed period of time

Horses provided formal training (groundwork or riding):   As needed; no set schedule

Additional information about our intake, assessment & training policies and practices:
Horses are selected and obtained by High Hopes solely on the basis of their suitability for use in the High Hopes programs. The staff, led by our Equine Operations Director, will determine each horse’s usefulness in fulfilling program needs, and will perform on-going evaluations of the existing herd of horses. As unmet needs are determined, the staff will search for prospective horses to meet these needs. We look for soundness at the walk, trot and canter with rhythmic and balanced gait. The horse should be obedient to both voice and leg aids, quiet and well mannered on the ground and accepting of assistive devices and equipment. The horse muse work easily in hand, and tolerate one or more people walking and trotting beside the horse to assist the rider. The majority of the horses at High Hopes are here under a free lease arrangement with the horse owner. Many of our free lease horses come from homes where they no longer can be actively ridden due to the owners personal circumstances. Occasionally a program need cannot be met with a free lease or donated horse and High Hopes will purchase a suitable equine partner. A horse being seriously considered for use in the program will undergo a trial period at High Hopes during which they will be evaluated and assessed by the High Hopes personnel and systematically introduced to all possible aspects of potential use. Any prospective horse brought onto High Hopes property must go through an isolation period of up to 30 days before introduction to the herd. Once a horse has been accepted into the program and passed its isolation period the horse will be placed in a paddock with 2 to 3 horses of suitable temperament. High Hopes horses typically serve 2 participants per day, four to five days a week. They receive routine farrier care, vaccinations, regular worming and dental care. We are also able to offer complementary therapies such as chiropractic and acupuncture, massage and trigger point myotherapy. We turn out our horses 24 hours per day in small herd paddocks at our 120 acre facility, where they always have shelter available in three sided sheds and automatic water cisterns. Daily care and feeding is provided by the Barn staff and a dedicated group of volunteers. Every horse under High Hopes care receives constant evaluations to determine to on-going suitability within the program. When a horse shows signs of physical or mental fatigue we take steps to correct the problem. Physical issues are addressed after consultation with our veterinary provider and the horse will not be returned to the program until the physical condition is resolved. Horses that show signs of being unhappy with their work are first evaluated to see if there is an underlying physical problem that needs to be addressed. If that is not the case then we look to see how the horse is being handled and if changes can be made to make the horse more comfortable. If after all these steps have been taken and the horse is still not able to work then steps will be taken to retire the horse and its placement will maximize the future humane care and protection of the horse. In the case of a free lease the horse will be returned to its owners care, if feasible. In the case of donated and purchased horses High Hopes will seek to place the horse in the appropriate care of a new party and ownership is transferred to that party. In some cases once a horse retires from High Hopes program its ownership cannot be transferred and its on-going care will be borne by High Hopes either at its own facility or if possible at Mitchell Farms, an equine retirement facility in Salem, CT. To ensure that our retired horses receive the best possible care High Hopes has established an Equine Care Fund and actively raises money to support this program. Money from the Equine Care Fund ensures that High Hopes can provide the best possible care for our horses until their last days, without impacting our on-going programs costs.


Our Equine Retirement Policy


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High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc. has the following policies and procedures related to horses that need to be retired, are no longer useful, or are no longer manageable:
    Horses may remain at our organization for their lifetimes
    Horses may be found suitable homes by our organization
    Horses may be returned to their owners
    In the case a horse is unmanageable and demonstrates repeated dangerous behaviors, the horse may be euthanized
    In the case a horse is unsound and/or unhealthy and cannot be treated to relieve suffering, the horse may be euthanized


More About Us


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High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc.
36 Town Woods Road
Old Lyme CT 06371
860-434-1974
Last Updated 2019-08-05

Public Charity

Our Mission/How we are involved with horses:
High Hopes' mission is to foster a vibrant community where horse and human interactions improve lives. We strive to provide a challenging yet secure environment in which to experience not only physical and occupational therapy but also freedom, mobility and accomplishment thereby gaining independence and building self esteem. Additionally, our underlying mission is to offer our programs to everyone who might benefit from them, regardless of financial means.


Primary Focus involving horses (Horse Welfare, Public Service, Sport & Recreation):  Public Service

Our organization conducts Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT) in accordance with the EQUUS Foundation Guidelines on Qualifications of Organizations Conducting Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT).

Our organization provides community outreach and/or public education programs involving horses.

100% of our total programs and services are horse-related.

Our organization conducts its horse-related programs at one facility.



EIN: 06-0987749
Founded: 1974

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